Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 27 of 27

Thread: PC restarting issue

  1. #16
    If you think it is the motherboard, try loosening the motherboard securing screws and just nipping them up. People have the tendency to overtighten them when the board should have some movement (not loose, but to allow for thermal expansion). If this works it is only temporary as the broken track or dry joint is still there.

  2. #17
    I'd also remove the motherboard from the case and place it on cardboard. Power it up with minimal stuff attached and see if the cycling is still there. Something could be shorting the board to the case.

    Been known to happen.

    On the new server front: With Hyper threaded Core i3- 4130 dual core 3.4GHz CPU, 24gb of ram, dual nics, and a 500gb SSD up and running CentOS 7

    DRAWING 27.3 Watts - 90% reduction in power consumption compared to the unit it's replacing, with better performance.

    Similar results with a second server running a quad core HT Xeon E3-1245 v5 3.5GHZ CPU with 64GB of ram and 2 SSD's in RAID1 and 2 2TB spinners in RAID0. The power savings will pay for these boxes over their lifetime - likely well before EOL. Power readings on this one are in the low 30's Watts.

    Just love it - can't even hear it running.

    Cooler, quieter, and better performance. What's not to like?
    Not complaining, just an observation.

  3. #18
    Originally Posted by GJ51 View Post (Source)
    DRAWING 27.3 Watts
    Very nice!

    Just one of my 10GbE cards alone draws 8.5W
    Drunks of Sol, Drunks of Sol, drunken spaceships full of lol

  4. #19
    I had something like this a while back.

    Go into BIOS and see if you have auto-start and auto-shut down selected.

    It can also be backup software turning your machine on to run a backup. Acronis does this on my machine on the weekends to back up my HD.
    AMD FX-8370 4.0GHz / 32 GB Ram / Titan X Pascal / ASUS Crosshair V Formula-Z ROG / HTC Vive / Steam VR Rating: 20937
    Independent Trader - Curious Explorer - The least talented smuggler in the Galaxy.
    "Play the game. Don't game the play." - Any grind, is in your mind.
    CMDR Shadragon / CMDR Drain Bamaged / CMDR CuteLilBunny


  5. #20
    UEFI BIOS configurations allow you to start your PC remotely. Some, like my Asus Strix Z270G motherboard, have their defaults set to Disabled but older UEFI BIOS's, like those for a 4770K CPU, sometimes have their one or more of their defaults set to Enabled. Or you may have changed a setting yourself by mistake.

    Check your BIOS settings again before digging too deeply into the hardware. There are several ways to turn a PC on remotely: by time of day, by RTC interrupt; by remote command via the NIC; by magic packet via the NIC, and more that I cannot remember right now. Any one of these, if Enabled in your BIOS, could make your PC behave as if some demonic force had taken over its on/off functions.

  6. #21
    I had another bash at this over the weekend.
    frustratingly it did a couple of cycles then was stable for several hours on Saturday (although I did get my Sirius permit in E : D which was handy!)
    It gave me a chance to look over the bios and there was nothing untoward in terms of start up settings.
    On Sunday it booted to windows then came up with the "windows shutting down" message which, I think, is what happens when you press the power button when windows is running. I slackened the screws for the mobo and put some non conductive material under the area where the power button plugs in, all to no avail.

    My spare power supply doesn't look too well however I didn't get much of a chance to test as my laptop broke on Sunday as well - bluetooth packed up but its a thinkpad in warantee so they're sending a replacement module, but it still took a bit of time to diagnose.

    I'm pretty much resigned to getting a new mobo. socket 1150's are getting thin on the ground so I'm thinking about an 1151 or AM4 for a ryzen. I've always been an AMD fan but when I put this together 3 years ago they weren't viable, has anyone had any experience with the new Ryzens?

  7. #22
    Originally Posted by xzanfr View Post (Source)
    I've always been an AMD fan but when I put this together 3 years ago they weren't viable, has anyone had any experience with the new Ryzens?
    I built my 1800X based system in March - it's working very well indeed - runs the game at about 15% load.

  8. #23
    Originally Posted by Robert Maynard View Post (Source)
    I built my 1800X based system in March - it's working very well indeed - runs the game at about 15% load.
    That looks really interesting Robert. One of the things I was wondering about was how they work with games, assuming that it would only be using 1 or 2 of the cores simultaneously. If the 1800x is hardly ticking over then something like a ryzen 5 would probably be pretty capable.
    One other thing - did you go with an x370 or B350 chipset on the motherboard?

  9. #24
    I see you're running an asus mobo.
    Are you running their AI software?
    Check out event viewer in windows -- if there is a "!" next to asus aI, remove it.
    The Asus AI interacts with the bios, any changes -- like overclocking- - are reflected in the bios. Bad or corrupt installs can cause the problems you're describing.

    also, and I'm sure you've done this, turn back all settings in bios to "normal," no overclocking, make sure the XMP on the mobo is switched off, etc.
    RIG: 6950x/ custom water loop// 2x Titan (XPs) //1tb M.2 drive/Northgate Omnimac Ultra/Corsair 900d case/Flux Capacitor/Time Spy: 17,986Fire Strike Ultra: 14,398 Fire Strike Extreme: 23,780

  10. #25
    Originally Posted by xzanfr View Post (Source)
    That looks really interesting Robert. One of the things I was wondering about was how they work with games, assuming that it would only be using 1 or 2 of the cores simultaneously. If the 1800x is hardly ticking over then something like a ryzen 5 would probably be pretty capable.
    One other thing - did you go with an x370 or B350 chipset on the motherboard?
    The Ryzen 5 would probably be fine. I went for the ASUS PRIME X370-PRO motherboard - although I'm not really making best use of its features (i.e. the CPU is at stock clocks).

  11. #26
    Originally Posted by xzanfr View Post (Source)
    That looks really interesting Robert. One of the things I was wondering about was how they work with games, assuming that it would only be using 1 or 2 of the cores simultaneously. If the 1800x is hardly ticking over then something like a ryzen 5 would probably be pretty capable.
    One other thing - did you go with an x370 or B350 chipset on the motherboard?
    If all you want to do is play games then a RyZen 5 will do you. If you want to do other things like video streaming, VR, or recording while playing, have dozens of web pages open, etc., get a RyZen 7 for the additional grunt. It will future proof your PC for longer as well.

    I'd recommend the ASUS Crosshair VI mobo for it's high number of USB 3.0 connectors for joysticks, HOTAS, headphones, etc. It has a wealth of features.

    Don't get me wrong. The R5 / B350 is a decent combo for gaming, but people seldom just do gaming. Don't underestimate what you need to do all your computing.
    AMD FX-8370 4.0GHz / 32 GB Ram / Titan X Pascal / ASUS Crosshair V Formula-Z ROG / HTC Vive / Steam VR Rating: 20937
    Independent Trader - Curious Explorer - The least talented smuggler in the Galaxy.
    "Play the game. Don't game the play." - Any grind, is in your mind.
    CMDR Shadragon / CMDR Drain Bamaged / CMDR CuteLilBunny


  12. #27
    AMD Ryzen CPUs are good, they can get the job done, and they are cheaper than Intel I7 CPUs; however, for gaming purposes on LGA1151 sockets, Ryzen CPUs are still slower than 7700K CPUs and Ryzen CPUs run hotter than 7700K CPUs. And that's why Intel can charge more for their CPUs!

    Be sure to compare the feature sets between the AMD 350 family and the Intel 270 family of chipsets for the motherboards you are interested in as well. For example, I chose my Asus Strix Z270G motherboard: because using the M2.2 slot on the underside defaults to x4 channel PCIe operation (from the 7700K CPU) which is perfect for a Samsung SM960 Pro NVMe SSD; because using the M2.2 slot leaves all six of my SATA ports open for other SSDs and hard drives; because the 4-pin fan connectors on the Asus Strix Z270 motherboard family lets me specify PWM or DC for my fan power as well as which thermal sensor(s) (CPU, PCH, motherboard, T_SENSOR input) to use for fan control; and the motherboard has a high current, W_PUMP fan connector to run a PWM (or DC) coolant pump for those of us who prefer to liquid cool our CPUs and/or systems.

    I looked at the Ryzen CPU and the Asus B350 family of motherboards before I let all of the above benefits influence my decision to purchase an Asus Strix Z270G Gaming (micro-ATX) motherboard and an Intel 7700K CPU to put into it.

    FYI, if you decide to purchase any Asus ROG (AMD or Intel) motherboard I suggest you consider purchasing 32GB of memory (16G for gaming (or apps); 16G for RamCache II) as the latter does amazing things to improve the performance numbers of all your SSDs and hard drives. And no, I have not gotten any BSODs while running RamCache II ... not while installing loads of software and games and not while playing games or using any apps. W10 Pro 64-bit (Creator edition) has performed flawlessly to date ... not even a burp or hiccup.

    The bloatware Microsoft insists on adding to their W10 OS with every major revision will not be discussed here as this is supposed to be a positive response to the OP's query.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12