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Thread: Alien bases grow - With an important update at Page 4

  1. #106
    Originally Posted by JW667 View Post (Source)
    If it bleeds, we can kill it.
    Ancient Thargoid saying!

  2. #107
    Regarding using Haversine to determine a surface line distance, I use this formula in Google Drive to get a distance between 2 points on Earth...

    Code:
    =ACOS(COS(RADIANS(90-{lat1})) *COS(RADIANS(90-{lat2})) +SIN(RADIANS(90-{lat1})) *SIN(RADIANS(90-{lat2})) *COS(RADIANS({long1}-{long2}))) *{planet radius}
    Breaking that down to measuring a distance between 2 points of lat-long, you need 5 pieces of data.

    Lat1, Long1, Lat2, Long2
    Planet radius in km

    To use it to measure the radius of a base, take the lat-long of the exact centre of the base at a fixed altitude (say 100m).
    Now move to the edge of the base and take another lat-long reading at 100m.
    Take the planet radius from the system map.
    Plug the info into the formula. You get the distance in km of the base radius. Double it to get a diameter.

  3. #108
    Originally Posted by Spiridon View Post (Source)
    While at it, I strongly suggest to collect some of these (while it's still easy). I have a hunch it will be needed for new stuff at the Engineers.
    it would be nice to do so, but with fdevs unabillity to make simple changes to a number and raise the storage .. well ..
    material and data storage, fdevs bureaucratic workflow is so painfull in cases like this one.

  4. #109
    Originally Posted by Zenith View Post (Source)
    Regarding using Haversine to determine a surface line distance, I use this formula in Google Drive to get a distance between 2 points on Earth...

    Code:
    =ACOS(COS(RADIANS(90-{lat1})) *COS(RADIANS(90-{lat2})) +SIN(RADIANS(90-{lat1})) *SIN(RADIANS(90-{lat2})) *COS(RADIANS({long1}-{long2}))) *{planet radius}
    Breaking that down to measuring a distance between 2 points of lat-long, you need 5 pieces of data.

    Lat1, Long1, Lat2, Long2
    Planet radius in km

    To use it to measure the radius of a base, take the lat-long of the exact centre of the base at a fixed altitude (say 100m).
    Now move to the edge of the base and take another lat-long reading at 100m.
    Take the planet radius from the system map.
    Plug the info into the formula. You get the distance in km of the base radius. Double it to get a diameter.
    The spherical cosines formula you give is right, but in some circumstances, depending on the implementation, you may find it isn't quite right. You're probably fine in Google Drive but I haven't tested it. In implementations with limited precision and over small distances it can fail.

    If you think you might be working with less than double-precision floats you are probably better off with the Haversine formula, even though it's hairier: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haversine_formula

  5. #110
    Watching people experiment on the alien bases makes me think back to Bugs Bunny testing artillery shells with a hammer.

    You know it's going to go sideways, you just don't know when.


  6. #111
    I'm glad to see my picture again. I am almost sure that we sooner or later get in contact with Targoid "Stations" or "Motherships".

    1st Picture-source used in this Thread: A closer look to the Targoid sections ( Edited Picture )

  7. #112
    Too bad we can't launch a CG to put a satellite in fixed orbit over the site to take time-lapsed photos.

    That's not something we can do, right?

  8. #113
    Originally Posted by CMDR EO View Post (Source)
    Too bad we can't launch a CG to put a satellite in fixed orbit over the site to take time-lapsed photos.

    That's not something we can do, right?
    All you need to do is head to a market that sells the appropriate pieces, buy the parts specified on the blueprint, then assemble it in the crafting menu. Be warned though, there is a fine for launching unauthorized devices and passers-by can either siphon the data off of it or destroy/salvage it for a nice payday!

    Hang on...shoot, wrong game!

  9. #114
    Originally Posted by Noctover View Post (Source)
    Still think they are ships being repaired and dug out by those drones
    That's my theory as well.

    Absolutely 100% sure they are alive in the same way the thargoid ships we have encountered so far are alive in some form or another.

    That being said, I don't think they are growing.

  10. #115
    Originally Posted by CmdrArdos View Post (Source)
    All you need to do is head to a market that sells the appropriate pieces, buy the parts specified on the blueprint, then assemble it in the crafting menu. Be warned though, there is a fine for launching unauthorized devices and passers-by can either siphon the data off of it or destroy/salvage it for a nice payday!

    Hang on...shoot, wrong game!
    what game is that? it sounds interesting lol

  11. #116
    Originally Posted by edd View Post (Source)
    The spherical cosines formula you give is right, but in some circumstances, depending on the implementation, you may find it isn't quite right. You're probably fine in Google Drive but I haven't tested it. In implementations with limited precision and over small distances it can fail.

    If you think you might be working with less than double-precision floats you are probably better off with the Haversine formula, even though it's hairier: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haversine_formula
    Ummm, that IS an implementation of the Haversine formula. I used that formula to calculate 1400km long geodesics along the Earth's surface in Ingress. The clearance between links was sometimes as small as 5m and yet it was still accurate enough to slip through the eye of the needle. If you want to get pedantic about sphere coordinates versus oblate spheroid coordinates, then we'll talk Vincenty, however for the purposes of double checking straight line surface distance, Haversine is going to be "good enough".

    I'm not committing to "it's true" or "it's not true" about the bases growing. I'm talking about the method I would use to confirm the diameter.

  12. #117
    Originally Posted by Zenith View Post (Source)
    Ummm, that IS an implementation of the Haversine formula. I used that formula to calculate 1400km long geodesics along the Earth's surface in Ingress. The clearance between links was sometimes as small as 5m and yet it was still accurate enough to slip through the eye of the needle. If you want to get pedantic about sphere coordinates versus oblate spheroid coordinates, then we'll talk Vincenty, however for the purposes of double checking straight line surface distance, Haversine is going to be "good enough".

    I'm not committing to "it's true" or "it's not true" about the bases growing. I'm talking about the method I would use to confirm the diameter.
    Note that Captain's Log has a handy Bearing and Distance calculator built into it - you simply plug in current and destination LAT/LON and the planet's radius and it'll spit out a bearing and distance - distance of course based on the Haversine formula

    If you've DSS'ed said planet, the radius is automatically entered.

  13. #118
    Originally Posted by Friedenreich Xante View Post (Source)
    Apparently Thargoids have Technology to grow organic stuff out of rock. See barnacles. Now look at this. The scavengers are kinda helping it grow, like gardeners of some sort.
    Maybe the Thargoids are a very clean race and dont like us driving our dirty-wheeled SRV's all around the place

  14. #119
    Originally Posted by Zenith View Post (Source)
    Ummm, that IS an implementation of the Haversine formula. I used that formula to calculate 1400km long geodesics along the Earth's surface in Ingress. The clearance between links was sometimes as small as 5m and yet it was still accurate enough to slip through the eye of the needle. If you want to get pedantic about sphere coordinates versus oblate spheroid coordinates, then we'll talk Vincenty, however for the purposes of double checking straight line surface distance, Haversine is going to be "good enough".

    I'm not committing to "it's true" or "it's not true" about the bases growing. I'm talking about the method I would use to confirm the diameter.
    The one you gave is sometimes called the spherical law of cosines. The two are obviously mathematically equivalent but the cosine one has issues in some implementations at some scales, that's all. In particular short scales which 1400km is distinctly not. I'm sure you are doing it fine but I wouldn't necessarily guarantee it for anyone who tried it in some circumstances using a calculator with poor precision. Should be fine over the scale of a whole thargoid base though.

  15. #120
    All this is cool, but...imagine if we could find out about it...BY ACTUALLY PLAYING THE GAME.

    At this point, more of Elite is played on the forums than in the game itself. This needs to be rectified.

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