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Thread: BBC B now reached 'cult' status

  1. #1

    BBC B now reached 'cult' status



    Hardcore...

  2. #2
    Ok, but why?

    And yes because it is a fun geeky thing to do is a perfectly good answer, I was just wondering why specifically a BBC?

    Regards,

    CMDR Burnt Phoenix
    Incompetent Imperial Clipper Captain

  3. #3
    Originally Posted by Burnt Phoenix View Post (Source)
    Ok, but why?

    And yes because it is a fun geeky thing to do is a perfectly good answer, I was just wondering why specifically a BBC?
    ...................
    Processor and architecture are my first thoughts on that.

  4. #4
    Originally Posted by Burnt Phoenix View Post (Source)
    Ok, but why?

    And yes because it is a fun geeky thing to do is a perfectly good answer, I was just wondering why specifically a BBC?

    Regards,

    CMDR Burnt Phoenix
    Incompetent Imperial Clipper Captain
    The first Elite was programmed for the BBC B micro. Didn't it reach down under? So many cmdrs had that first experience with that machine. There are many cool things that can be done with that now








    If only ...



  5. #5
    Originally Posted by starman View Post (Source)
    The first Elite was programmed for the BBC B micro. Didn't it reach down under? So many cmdrs had that first experience with that machine. There are many cool things that can be done with that now
    Well, I don't know if the BBC made it to Australia but I had never heard of one until I read up on the history of Elite (probably while playing Frontier on a 486). My first encounter with Elite was the Firebird version on the C64 and later the vastly improved vesion on the Amiga 500. The computers that were around in Aus that I was aware of were:
    C64
    Vic 20
    various Tandy computers
    the Coco 3 (I think that may belong in the Tandy box?) this one took cartridges or tapes and had a very cool cartridge game called 'Dungeons of Dageroth'
    a Dick Smith computer
    the microbee.

  6. #6
    And don't forget the Electron Actually my first experience of Elite was seeing it on my friend's Acorn Electron, and quite a feat of programming that must have been (the Electron was a 'cut down' BBC).

    In the UK during the start of the home computing era, BBC's were common in many schools, so most kids in the 80's would have had some computer experience using them. The problem was that for the time they were seriously expensive bits of kit, and even though my Electron owning friend did get a full BBC B a few years later, most families and kids would have difficulty being able to afford one.

    This is where (in the UK) the Sinclair Spectrum hit a six (or 'home run' depending on which english speaking country you come from), bringing home computing into the 'mostly affordable' range.

    I ended up with an Atari 8 bit (800 XL) in that era, mostly as it was super cheap (£80 at the time iirc) as Atari had 'lost' it's war with Commodore, but i will always remember the first time i saw Elite on that humble Acorn Electron, and then again on the BBC B micro. Elite along with Aviator were technical marvels of gaming in that period i think

  7. #7
    Originally Posted by Zak Gordon View Post (Source)
    And don't forget the Electron Actually my first experience of Elite was seeing it on my friend's Acorn Electron, and quite a feat of programming that must have been (the Electron was a 'cut down' BBC).

    In the UK during the start of the home computing era, BBC's were common in many schools, so most kids in the 80's would have had some computer experience using them. The problem was that for the time they were seriously expensive bits of kit, and even though my Electron owning friend did get a full BBC B a few years later, most families and kids would have difficulty being able to afford one.

    This is where (in the UK) the Sinclair Spectrum hit a six (or 'home run' depending on which english speaking country you come from), bringing home computing into the 'mostly affordable' range.

    I ended up with an Atari 8 bit (800 XL) in that era, mostly as it was super cheap (£80 at the time iirc) as Atari had 'lost' it's war with Commodore, but i will always remember the first time i saw Elite on that humble Acorn Electron, and then again on the BBC B micro. Elite along with Aviator were technical marvels of gaming in that period i think
    I have been trying too.

    This was my first computer. And how I first 'experienced' Elite in all its monochrome sun Less glory.

    In all truth it was impossible to play never really got nowhere fast. Docking was near imposs.

    OK so in actuality the primary reason bought the 'Acorn Electron' was because it had no games which e considered a waste of time and it had the same 'language' as the been which we had at school with disk s.

    That's where saw the actual 'proper' version with Color . IM like what have I bought?

    I suppose I could have stuck one of those color transparencies on screen.

    I was a game reviewer and I would get sent. Elite was the one game I paid like £15 in 1984 - a small fortune.


    The best game on Electron was probs Chuckie egg.

    There was never 1 perfect micro in existence . This as is now a deliberate by the corporations.



    There is a reason there are land fills full of Electrons.

    I spent most time coding my own game.

    Also it is clear here in UK we don't understand marketing..


    U can see why the 8bit home market eventually dies.

    I don't get this sudden revival of Spectrum

    They didn't have good graphics then and certainly not know. And the sound keyboard???

    A cautionary tale.


  8. #8
    Originally Posted by starman View Post (Source)
    I have been trying too.

    This was my first computer. And how I first 'experienced' Elite in all its monochrome sun Less glory.

    In all truth it was impossible to play never really got nowhere fast. Docking was near imposs.
    I played Elite on the C64 which had yellow jaggy suns and green almost as jaggy planets. I was quite sucessful at it and got to the rank of Deadly. My friends had the game before me and none of them could work out how to dock either, they would think they were lined up and then all of a sudden at the last moment the opening would slide off the screen in one direction or another. So I developed a proceedure that worked as long as you were careful and meticulous.

    you would come out of 'which space' Near the sun, and the compass would point toward the planet.
    Fly toward the planet there used to be a dot at the centre of the screen and I would line this up with the centre of the planet as I flew/jumped toward the planet.
    as you got cloes the the planet you would eventually come within range of the space station and your compass now pointed at the station.
    I would now continue to fly toward the planet, lined up with the centre as best I could and watch the compass, as the solid doe of the compass moved toward the edge I would keep going as just as the dot turned hollow I would come to a complete stop. at ths point the station is at almost exactly 90 degrees from the line that extends from you to the centre of the planet. and as your compass dot has turned hollow you know that your altitude is slightly lower than the station.
    Turn toward the station, locate its pixel, or if you happen to be closer it may now be more than a pixel. (at this point we are still stationary).
    A space stations opening always points directly at the planet, so I would put the arc of the planet on the right hand side of the screen with the stations pixel just a bit to the left of my screen centre pixel, I would set this up very carefully making sure that my screen centre pixel was in the same row as the station pixel and the neerest planet pixel (the "point" of the planets curve).
    Once I was sure I had that perfect I would accelerate, when the station dissapeared off the left side of the screen, I would switch to left view and wait for it to appear.
    as it rolled onto the screen I would slow right down so that I am just crawling forward, I would the watch the station carefully as it rolled across the screen,aligning with roll only the station to the centre of the screen, looking for the moment when none of the sides of the station are visible at all and I can only see the face. I would come to a stop right here and watch it complete a couple of full turns making sure that when the square of the station was aligned with the screen the lopening was a ferfect oblong, if all this looked good it meant you were in the perfect position.
    With my propulsion still at zero I now turn and lign up perfectly with the opening and begin slowly crepping forward, I would let the "letter box" rotate until it was aligned with me then I would roll maybe 15 degrees ahead of it and stop and let it get about 15 degrees ahead of my, then I would again roll 15 degrees ahead. We didn't have analogue controls in those days so this was the best approximation of matching the roll of the station. By continuing with this proceedure you could reliably dock in around 10 minutes.
    You then saved up and bought a docking computer fairly quick LOL.

    Regards,

    CMDR Burnt Phoenix