Page 5 of 21 First 345679 Last
Results 61 to 75 of 315

Thread: ED Astrometrics: Maps and Visualizations

  1. #61
    Rather irrelevant to everyone else, but I managed to animate my jump history, through to a few days ago. The video displays 60 jumps per second (60 fps), skipping over jumps that would be within the same pixel when rendered at 4k. The video was downscaled to 1080p before sending to youtube (though I probably didn't need to do so). It plays through over 18k jumps in about 4 minutes.





    I wish it were possible to open that capability up to everyone, but this is a pretty heavy process on the server that takes some time, plus it's using the personal EDSM API keys and working around the API rate limiting, to pull 7-day chunks of travel history. I have that latter part split out into a daily "what's new?" sort of lookup.

    Anyway, I thought I would share the pure geekery that's continuing over here. I always think it's cool when you can go beyond a game, and create a meta-game on top of it.

  2. #62

  3. #63
    Impressive stuff Cmdr!

    Out of curiosity what tool are you using to visualise this with?

    I played around with Tableau a few weeks ago looking at my own EDSM logs. Here's my own humble efforts:
    https://public.tableau.com/profile/p...DistantRepairs

    To look at everything where would I look for the EDSM full log?

    Thanks

  4. #64
    Originally Posted by DaytonEclipse View Post (Source)
    Impressive stuff Cmdr!

    Out of curiosity what tool are you using to visualise this with?

    I played around with Tableau a few weeks ago looking at my own EDSM logs. Here's my own humble efforts:
    https://public.tableau.com/profile/p...DistantRepairs

    To look at everything where would I look for the EDSM full log?

    Thanks
    EDDB publishes all it's APIs on this page.

    The one you want for raw visited system data is systems.csv (2 GB)

  5. #65
    Originally Posted by ModishNouns View Post (Source)
    EDDB publishes all it's APIs on this page.

    The one you want for raw visited system data is systems.csv (2 GB)
    Extending on that, you'll also need EDSM's bodies.json (11 GB) to process the bodies contained within those systems, since EDDB doesn't provide its bodies.jsonl anymore.

  6. #66
    Originally Posted by DaytonEclipse View Post (Source)
    Out of curiosity what tool are you using to visualise this with?

    I wrote my own programs in Perl, using the ImageMagick module to do all of the drawing, and a MySQL database to store all of the data. I have scheduled jobs that run the data imports and look for changes to sync into it, so that the maps can be kept up to date. Because the "bodies.json" file is so huge, I'm only updating that (and the maps) once every two weeks currently, except for additional manual map updates when I make changes.

  7. #67
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    Rather irrelevant to everyone else, but I managed to animate my jump history, through to a few days ago. The video displays 60 jumps per second (60 fps), skipping over jumps that would be within the same pixel when rendered at 4k. The video was downscaled to 1080p before sending to youtube (though I probably didn't need to do so). It plays through over 18k jumps in about 4 minutes.
    I made an improved version of this. The trails have fading color, so that it's easier to follow in the denser parts of the animation. Plus it skips the boring parts a bit better, making it about 2:42 in length, instead of 4 minutes.




  8. #68
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    I wish it were possible to open that capability up to everyone, but this is a pretty heavy process on the server that takes some time, plus it's using the personal EDSM API keys and working around the API rate limiting, to pull 7-day chunks of travel history. I have that latter part split out into a daily "what's new?" sort of lookup.
    Would it be possible to convert it into a utility that we could run ourselves using the data from our local EDDiscovery databases? That way there would be no additional impact on EDSM.

  9. #69
    Originally Posted by Allitnil View Post (Source)
    Would it be possible to convert it into a utility that we could run ourselves using the data from our local EDDiscovery databases? That way there would be no additional impact on EDSM.
    Huh, interesting idea. I'm not sure that I can, since it's a linux script. But let me think on that. Perl can run in Windows too, and it would need to be converted to use sqlite instead of mysql, etc. Not impossible. I'll give it some thought.

  10. #70
    Interesting, "O" and "B" class stars also have those exclusion bars, like the neutron stars.



  11. #71
    Os I can understand, but I'm surprised about the and about how sharp it is.

    Thinks.

    Have you got one with just A stars? It would be useful to know if there is any diminution of the number of As inside the exclusion zone - i.e. if the cutoff is based on the mass of the primary star, and if so, is the cutoff set exactly at the A-B mass boundary, or somewhere within the A range.

  12. #72
    Originally Posted by Jackie Silver View Post (Source)
    Have you got one with just A stars? It would be useful to know if there is any diminution of the number of As inside the exclusion zone - i.e. if the cutoff is based on the mass of the primary star, and if so, is the cutoff set exactly at the A-B mass boundary, or somewhere within the A range.
    It looks like A-stars don't have exclusion ranges like that. I had originally made that image with A stars included, and while the bars were visible, I wasn't sure if it was just O stars or both O/B stars, so I generated this one with the A stars excluded to see it better. When the A-stars were there, they obscured the exclusion regions a bit.

  13. #73
    When looking into these exclusion zones it's helpful to filter out the manually authored systems. That way you get rid of the fluff around the bubble, making the zones' borders even more distinct.

    After this, there will still be a handful of stars in the exclusion zone, for which which I wasn't able to find a pattern yet. Based on Jackie's post I might go back and check not only what class they are, but also what they should be (which AFAIK isn't always the same).

  14. #74
    Perhaps some mass code maps could also help? Although I don't expect the exclusion zone to appear clearly on those, maybe just on the higher codes.

  15. #75
    The higher mass code systems (eg AA-A H*) do exist in the exclusion zone, it's just that the contents of the systems has been overridden to lower mass stars. That said, it would still be interesting to see mass code distributions just in case it throws up something!