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Thread: Beyond 3.0 Open Beta: Aliens Spoilers

  1. #136
    Originally Posted by clavain View Post (Source)
    I'm surprised that Sirius has not put a hit out on you yet...
    I'm allied,

  2. #137
    Well, it's not directly about the beta, but I think HIP 22460 will finally be unlocked in the live version and there will be Thargoids there (and the Overlook, ofc).

    https://forums.frontier.co.uk/showth...=1#post6280359

    Unfortunately, the issue could be resolved (and nobody could check HIP 22460 because of the lock, but obviously QA-Mitch did not have this on his radar).

    HIP 17692 was where the Blackmount Orbital CG would take place 2 days later.

    But Pleiades sector mi-s b4-0 does not seem to be in the Canonn map or look anything special to me. Why did he pick that system?

    O7,

  3. #138
    Nice! I'm expecting HIP 22460 to be a very interesting place (No idea what, but... gotta be good right?).

  4. #139
    Interesting heads up .

    Pleiades sector mi-s b4-0 rings a bell for some reason, can't remember why, I've got to check a few things out.........

    Ah yea, knew it! I visited that system on 27/12/17 & logged 3 NHSSs in 7 mins.

  5. #140
    FWIW, did a complete scan of Pleiades sector mi-s b4-0 yesterday, and it's really full of NHSS at some parts (mostly threat level 5, some 7, up to 5 NHSS at a time), but didn't notice anything special otherwise. Only 1 jump from Merope, could be they just set it up along with the CG.

    O7,

  6. #141
    For the record, a number of other things have changed in the obeslisk audio:

    1) The temporal length of all bars has increased by around 20%.
    2) The temporal length of all sparse-spaces has increased by around 20%.
    3) The end-of-packet sequence has increased from 12.46 seconds to 16.13 seconds.
    4) The frequency extent of all bars has changed a bit. In particular, L bars were shortened and N bars were lengthened.
    5) The adjacency rules are still the same (i.e. like-bars don't like being right next to each other).

    Additionally, I've found that it's a bit easier to automatically extract data packet info. When I first had a look at obelisk audio in the Beta, I thought these were all arbitrary changes, but I'm starting to think otherwise. This could all amount to nothing, but perhaps the fdevs are setting the stage for a viable gameplay mechanic here.



  7. #142
    I had a look at 183 data packets in the 3.0 Beta. The statistical characteristics of the data packets are pretty much the same as in the live game. The curious spike at Length=9 is still there (previously seen in this study: https://canonn.science/codex/analysi...-data-packets/). I should note that none of the data packets were seen to repeat in the Beta, which is the same result we got in 2.4.

    This is one of the first things I'll look at when 3.0 is released. There's still a chance they'll inject easy-to-decode meaning into the obelisk audio in the 3.0 release.



  8. #143

  9. #144
    Originally Posted by Maligno View Post (Source)
    I had a look at 183 data packets in the 3.0 Beta. The statistical characteristics of the data packets are pretty much the same as in the live game. The curious spike at Length=9 is still there (previously seen in this study: https://canonn.science/codex/analysi...-data-packets/). I should note that none of the data packets were seen to repeat in the Beta, which is the same result we got in 2.4.

    This is one of the first things I'll look at when 3.0 is released. There's still a chance they'll inject easy-to-decode meaning into the obelisk audio in the 3.0 release.


    https://i.imgur.com/TnDpWdd.png
    Good going mate, that looks good.

    I had an idea while staring at the lines. I took your image and royally butchered it (a thousand appolagies in advance ) and thought the spectrograph looked... odd, once I had done it.

    Here's how the unedited chop looks like, below.





    As you can see from the above image, only two of the bars are seemingly disjointed from the rest on the right-hand side...

    Why this is, I don't know.

    Here are the patterns I noticed:





    And when looking closer at the thin yellow bars, could it be text or digits?




  10. #145
    Originally Posted by CMDR Dreamstate View Post (Source)
    Good going mate, that looks good.

    I had an idea while staring at the lines. I took your image and royally butchered it (a thousand appolagies in advance ) and thought the spectrograph looked... odd, once I had done it.

    Here's how the unedited chop looks like, below.



    As you can see from the above image, only two of the bars are seemingly disjointed from the rest on the right-hand side...

    Why this is, I don't know.

    Here are the patterns I noticed:



    And when looking closer at the thin yellow bars, could it be text or digits?

    Thanks for having a closer look at that spectrogram.

    The areas with horizontal lines are ones that I call "Sparce Spaces" (see https://canonn.science/codex/analysi...-data-packets/ for more details). They are regions that are not completely empty and are comprised of around 10 horizontal lines. There are about 11 unique Sparse Spaces, 5 of which happen exclusively in the end-of-packet sequence, 2 that happen before or after the regular bars (L and N to be exact), and 3 others that can be found in the main packet sequence, usually between N-L-S-T bars (plus a tiny one that always accompanies one of those 3). We've found that those 3 Sparse Spaces follow similar rules to N-L-S-T bars, i.e. they don't like to occur next to each other and there must be at least 1 of each in a data packet. We believe that those 3 Sparse Spaces could very well convey information. We still don't have a clue what sort of numerical system (or meaning) these patterns map to.

    The pattern that you highlighted in green is simply an effect that has always been in the obelisk audio. Now that the data packets have been shifted down in frequency they are subjected to that "inverse noise" patch.

    Regarding a possible modulation in the horizontal lines found in the Sparse Spaces, well, I'll need to have a closer look at that. I doubt there's anything there because they are rather noisy.

  11. #146
    Just a quick note that I will be locking this thread and unpinning it when Beyond releases this week. But not deleting so that the information is still available to those who need it.

  12. #147
    Originally Posted by Han_Zen View Post (Source)
    I'm allied,
    I knew there was something dodgy about you.

  13. #148
    Just wanted to jot down a few thoughts before the thread is locked.

    I enhanced the Automatic Data Packet Recognition algorithm to extract all information-carrying signal components, including the areas with horizontal lines, which I will call Codons (photon, proton...get it? ) from now on (I used to call them Sparse Spaces, but that's quite a mouthful).

    The image below shows a typical data packet with all Bars and Codons extracted (collectively, they are known as Tokens, a term coined by CMDR Clanga farther upthread).





    It appears that N bars in the main part of the signal are longer than they used to be. In 2.4 they used to be just as long as the other N bar that always appears at the end of the signal. Others have suspected that N bars act as signal separators, and given the way they look now I think I'm convinced that's the case as well.

    For each data packet I extracted all of the sub-packets within the N bar separators. The figure below shows a histogram of the number of sub-packets across all 183 data packets I recorded in the 3.0 Beta. The histogram resembles a Poisson distribution...so something we would expect in certain natural processes, such as the number of decay events per second from a radioactive source





    The figure below shows a histogram of sub-packet length (i.e. number of Tokens). I think this particular histogram appears to follow a Power-Law distribution...again, something that happens in certain physical or biological phenomena.





    Now, the figure below shows a histogram of data packet length. This is similar to the one I showed a few posts ago, except it now includes the number of Codons in a data packet. The statistics are not high enough to draw any kind of conclusion, but just like in other cases I looked at in the past the distribution has suspicious spikes.





    Currently, I don't think these data packets are encoding any meaningful information. At least these figures will provide a baseline that we can compare to in the future. It's possible the fdevs will decide to "enable" meaningful information in the data packets in the months to come.

  14. #149
    Thread locked. Will unsticky after some time has passed.

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