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Thread: Anaconda Tips

  1. #16
    Originally Posted by Krash View Post (Source)
    Impressive build. Even with 63ly range I didn't have to worry about gaps on the way to Sag A*, and with the vanity cam is the cockpit view really a valid complaint? I got some really good screenshots on my trip and the best ones include the conda in the shot anyway.
    Agreed, but there are some who do find the cockpit matters, and I wanted to point out a few flaws with how it's laid out for those to whom it does...

    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    I took my Anaconda across the galaxy twice, and in the end, it was the cockpit views that killed it for me more than the steering.
    There's one now, look!

    [
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    I would caution about making this an absolute statement. There's no right or wrong here, it depends on what you're doing. I use both methods (zero throttle, and full throttle), depending on where I am, and what I'm doing, whether I'm in the Asp or the Anaconda.

    BTW, clever use of square brackets to hide the "noob" comment in there. (EDIT: To be fair, I saw this when quoting the text, I see now that it's the code for the upside-down smiley)
    Yes, it's the code for a smiley, no insult was intended.

    As for arriving at zero speed, outside of extreme-buckyballing where tiny fractions of a second off jump time counts, it's not something you should be doing; you can throttle up back to speed in very similar times, especially on a HOTAS or with the 75% speed button, but being stationary also gives you the option to immediately drop out of supercruise, freeze all solar system wide influences, and take stock. And most importantly of all, if you're at zero speed, the temperature gauge acts as an instant safety warning. Moving around will change the temperature, but if it's rising as soon as you arrive and you're stationary, there's a star off screen somewhere that's too close and baking you.

    Again though, some people just like the "feel" of always being moving.

    Originally Posted by Major Klutz View Post (Source)
    My best tip for you is Don't A rate everything. D rated modules weigh less and so give you better range. In many cases A rating a module provides zero advantage for exploration and in other cases a D rated module performs better and is lighter than a smaller A rated module.
    Use this outfitting link as a guide. https://eddp.co/u/R3jBol3w
    The only exception is the power supply. You can't fit the 3D or 2D, and the 2A actually works out to weigh less than the 4D, and gives enough power to run everything with engineering. Otherwise this advice is spot on. D rate everything to shave weight, then shave the fitting itself to shave even more off.

    Originally Posted by Goobertech View Post (Source)
    I've gone to Beagle and back in my Anaconda and I've gone to just about every nebula within 15k of the bubble in my AspX. This is just my $0.02 based on my limited experience:

    If you fly safe, all the extra's in the Anaconda are irrelevant. Nice to have? Absolutely. Helpful if you play in a group? (fuel and repair limpets) Oh for sure? But if you play solo and don't spend a lot of time fooling around doing crazy stuff on planets or flying between a star and a black hole that will cook your hull...all those extra's spend 99%-100% of the time being powered off anyways. Maybe it's peace of mind but I think it's mostly an immersion thing for many. Leaving for a long time? Bring a bigger ship that holds everything you could conceivably want or need. That was my thinking when I left on my trip. When I got back I realized I could have done that same trip in a ship w/o any of the extra's quite easily.
    I thought that too... but then I did some basic tests over a 20,000ly plot. Adding an SRV and a shield took 1ly off my jump range, which I expected to really add up over that distance, but it only added up to 4 extra jumps. That's maybe 8 minutes at most over a multi-hour journey, but it allowed me to land and scoop extra materials for jumponium, and provided basic impact protection.

    I've since arrived at Beagle Point without taking damage even once; so I didn't need it either. But I can now join Saturday's SRV races there too. So it's turned out to be more than worth it just from a fun point of view.

    Originally Posted by OldManKnott View Post (Source)
    I now have a jump range of 56ly and a lot more money back in the bank!!! I still intend to visit the other FSD engineer to see if I can up it further, (would love to know how some of you get 70ly ranges).

    Tonight I intend to go a bit further out using the new jump range until I can find a few unexplored systems, then try out the new ship to explore the whole system, land on a few planets and see how I like it. Then I'll probably head back and configure/play some more.
    A crap-tonne of engineering for the weight reduction mods, basically. You can have an almost identical range to mine because there's no longer any random results and, bar for a single item, the new engineering caps are higher than the god-roll tier mods under the old system. The only exception is there's no Grade 5 for Sensors, and by a miracle this was one of the few under the old engineering I got a god-roll on. Looking at rest of people's results, it only adds up to a 0.19ly advantage though. So it's really about picking the best engineering bonuses.

    If you're looking to land in an Anaconda, bear in mind for planetary landings, Thruster strength only applies to the main engines. If you use the manoeuvre thrusters instead, they're all at equal fixed thrust regardless of engine size, so you can go with the smallest possible thrusters you can to get off the ground, then when landing, drop your gear, and come down vertically on the manoeuvre thrusters instead. Remember that Elite allows multi-mapped controls, so I have my HOTAS hat switch mapped to changing power controls (shield, eng, weps) but when the landing gear is down, they switch to up/down, left/right fine control.

    Originally Posted by MattG View Post (Source)
    To hit 70, you're looking at stripping down to a "paper conda" - something like this. Basically, strip down to lightest viable components (except FSD), and engineer them to the max.

    Fine if you just want a taxi, but not too much fun. That said, 60 or even 65 is achievable in a much more viable build.
    My taxi version has 73.94ly, he he. You don't need shields even in the bubble, because unless you're carrying cargo, even interdictions won't actually attack you. Maybe if you're worried about pranging a station on landing (and even the docking computer does that occasionally) but it's not essential.

    However my build above shows you can break 70 easily in a usable build. The real problem is all the miserable engineer grinding you have to do to unlock the options.

    There's also the Thargoid thingies that presumably add 10ly, but frankly the engineer grind was bad enough, so I've never looked into that.

  2. #17
    Originally Posted by Titler View Post (Source)
    As for arriving at zero speed, outside of extreme-buckyballing where tiny fractions of a second off jump time counts, it's not something you should be doing; you can throttle up back to speed in very similar times, especially on a HOTAS or with the 75% speed button, but being stationary also gives you the option to immediately drop out of supercruise, freeze all solar system wide influences, and take stock. And most importantly of all, if you're at zero speed, the temperature gauge acts as an instant safety warning. Moving around will change the temperature, but if it's rising as soon as you arrive and you're stationary, there's a star off screen somewhere that's too close and baking you.
    That's the thing though, coming out at full throttle is just fine if you're trying to keep the pace up, and only want to stop if there's something particularly interesting on the map. You can come out at full throttle, aim past the exclusion zone, and look at the map while scooping. There's nothing fundamentally wrong with this approach. It does force you to be attentive and do some steering immediately after witch space, true, but if that suits what you're doing at the time, it's perfectly fine and can be done safely. With the Anaconda, there's a smaller margin of error due to how slowly it turns, so 75% throttle can be better here, rather than 100%, but you also have time to adjust this if you need to.

    The zero throttle approach is more safe in that it doesn't require you to be as attentive, and accounts for issues with control loss, such as a Windows popup stealing focus from the game during witch space. It also gives you a chance to scan the star while looking at the map.

    Like I said, I use both methods routinely, and each explorer tends to have their preferences, so I wouldn't say one is right and the other is wrong.

  3. #18
    The thing about paper conda isnt really true anyway. I got 68ly and its only 3/4 engineered. Thats with a class 4 power plant and life support weight untouched. Runnning with everytihng switched on aswell, shield and everything (no fighter). I expect ill get that down to a 3 at least but im still engineer grinding and it is truely painful The grind is the reason i have hardly played in months, can only handle small doses. 70ly is almost baseline for a long range explorer i feel.

    I mean i guess its paper compared to a fully kitted combat ship...

  4. #19
    Before you head out... stay a while. I'm oldish (compared to your average gamer) and later this year I' planning to head out with Beagle point expedition - and a whole.bunch of exploration additions Q4.might bring. You just might be sorry to not have all the latest toys if you set out now.

    Edit: Distant worlds expedition...

  5. #20
    An exploraconda may be paper thin, but if you can land in Achenar 3 without being destroyed, it is strong enough.

  6. #21
    70ly is getting close to the extreme end of engineering, at which point you have to start making choices on what to take or leave. Unless there is a specific system that requires that range, I do not see the point in sacrificing ship capabilities.

  7. #22
    Or SLF or SRV. Just for fun.

  8. #23
    A jump range of 40 ly will allow you to travel through all regions of the galaxy save for one or two inter-arm voids, or 35 ly plus synthesized boosts. Any range increase over that "only" enables you to reach farther stars on the extreme edge of the galaxy, and to travel faster. Every time when you put on weight (on your ship, that is ), you're trading jump range for something else. Whether the trade-off is worth it is subjective: how much importance do you place on reaching your destination faster, and how more useful would be the added utility, defense et cetera for you?
    The only thing that's clear cut is that if you wish to go as far out to the edge as possible, then jump range is the most important thing.

    As for hostile NPCs: while they are thankfully rare, "psycho" NPCs do exist. If you come across them, they will attack you without reason, regardless of not having cargo.
    Granted, even a paper Anaconda without shields should still have enough armour to escape them, but you will take serious damage - hopefully not to any modules that would leave you unable to wake out. (On an Asp, on the other hand...) This also depends on your highest rank, mind. (For the purposes of this, NPCs will be spawned by you will have your highest rank minus one, unless your highest is combat.)
    The chances of such an encounter are rare enough that you only might want to arrange an escort on your way back, when you are loaded with data. So, something to consider.

  9. #24
    As before, thanks for all the advice. Glad I started this thread now.

    Last night I went on a test run with a Conda build I like, (a mix of all posted on this thread), took 2 SRVs, an extra fuel tank, repair modules, heat sinks and some shields. Every thing else was lightweight so I was still able to get slightly over 50ly jumps max. I soon realised the extra fuel tank was a waste of time as staying at full speed I could quite easily fill up the tank at every scoopable star, (overheating doesn't seem to be a huge problem with this ship). In no time I was over 1000ly's from the bubble and finding undiscovered systems, (didn't fly N, NW or S). I eventually found one with a few gas giants with moons and tested what it was like discovering them all. No problems whatsoever. Landed on a low gravity moon and went for a trek, again no issues.

    With rough calculations I'd say I'm getting 3500 ly's an hour in perfect conditions. This will improve with a better loadout.

    The only downside right now is I have no boost, (Insufficient Energy in Capacitor message), which I assume is down to having a low power distribution module in a higher slot. I miss boost!

    So yes, I like this ship and am going to keep it for at least one massive explore, (yes Space Voyager, I'll use it for the Distant Worlds trip), probably many more, but there's still a lot of tinkering to do yet until I'm completely happy. I think a few long passenger runs will help the shakedown as well.

  10. #25
    About the distributor and boosting: in an Anaconda, you need at least a 5A stock power distributor to boost. You can use lower (and thus, lighter) ones if you engineer them. Unless I'm mistaken, the lightest you can go while still retaining boost is 4D, engineered with a grade 5 engine focused mod. It's quite the difference though: 5A weighs 20T (18T with the stripped down effect applied), while 4D weighs only 4T (or 3.6T, if you're minmaxing).

  11. #26
    Originally Posted by marx View Post (Source)
    About the distributor and boosting: in an Anaconda, you need at least a 5A stock power distributor to boost. You can use lower (and thus, lighter) ones if you engineer them. Unless I'm mistaken, the lightest you can go while still retaining boost is 4D, engineered with a grade 5 engine focused mod. It's quite the difference though: 5A weighs 20T (18T with the stripped down effect applied), while 4D weighs only 4T (or 3.6T, if you're minmaxing).
    That is a great tip, much appreciated.

  12. #27
    Originally Posted by marx View Post (Source)
    About the distributor and boosting: in an Anaconda, you need at least a 5A stock power distributor to boost. You can use lower (and thus, lighter) ones if you engineer them. Unless I'm mistaken, the lightest you can go while still retaining boost is 4D, engineered with a grade 5 engine focused mod. It's quite the difference though: 5A weighs 20T (18T with the stripped down effect applied), while 4D weighs only 4T (or 3.6T, if you're minmaxing).
    That is correct. My 'Conda is currently using the 4D with maxed out Engine focused/stripped down. Boosting empties the distributor but for the weight, I love having boost for under 4 tons.

  13. #28
    Originally Posted by Goobertech View Post (Source)
    That is correct. My 'Conda is currently using the 4D with maxed out Engine focused/stripped down. Boosting empties the distributor but for the weight, I love having boost for under 4 tons.
    Well I tried engineering the 4D and it wasn't having it so I simply dumped it and purchased a 5A. I'm happy to sacrafice a bit of jump range to have my lovely boost back again .

  14. #29
    Originally Posted by OldManKnott View Post (Source)
    Well I tried engineering the 4D and it wasn't having it so I simply dumped it and purchased a 5A. I'm happy to sacrafice a bit of jump range to have my lovely boost back again .
    For the 4D to work you need to do the G5 engine focused mod, then you can even add the stripped down effect for less mass.

  15. #30
    Originally Posted by OldManKnott View Post (Source)
    Well I tried engineering the 4D and it wasn't having it so I simply dumped it and purchased a 5A. I'm happy to sacrafice a bit of jump range to have my lovely boost back again .
    You need to get the 4D to the high end of a Grade 5 Engine Focused mod. That's done by The Dweller
    A 5D will boost with a Grade 3 Engine Focused mod from Marco Qwent.

    I used to use a 5D PD with a grade 3 Engine Focused. When grade 5 became available I went ahead and took my 5D up to grade 5 and it's nice because I can boost more often. The charge rate is fast enough to basically boost continuously.
    I did the mod on a 4D also just to compare and I can't boost until the capacitor is completely full but it's still fast enough that I can stay over 300m/s continuously.
    On my build, the difference between 4D and 5D (with stripped down) is 67.2Ly or 66.81 (0.39Ly)

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