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Thread: What does this sentence mean?

  1. #31
    It's what happens after browsing dank birb memes all night.

  2. #32
    Originally Posted by halo jones 101 View Post (Source)
    The is dependant as others have said on the context, however I have heard and on rare occasion, used in the context of inferring that "The Gentleman" is an unthinking dullard...

    Posh snark.
    Ah. Yeah. It's not an old advice but rather an insult. Makes more sense. It's just a nice way of saying, "that guy is an idiot."

  3. #33
    Contemporaneously:
    "The {sarcastically polite term for an idiot male} is operating mindlessly by willful choice."

    Implication is not only that he is acting foolishly, but has done so on purpose - probably for a malign reason.
    The (possibly enforced?) sarcastic respect in the sentence suggests that it was used in Parliament.

  4. #34
    As people have said, the sentence needs to have a context. The verb 'dispose' has numerous meanings.
    On the face of it, it's suggesting that the gentleman's need or ability to think has been compromised or abandoned- hence why we have seen alcohol and women mentioned. The preposition 'of' is suggestive here, along with the noun phrase 'capacity to think'. 'Dispose of' is higher register than the phrasal verb 'get rid of' as is 'gentleman' rather than 'guy/fella' or whatever.
    The gentleman doesn't dispose himself of, so no reflexive or personal intent. Something does this to him or makes him do it.
    Best I can do, sleutelbos, and I have been drinking a bit this evening!
    Where did you dig up the sentence?

  5. #35
    Originally Posted by %OnePercent% View Post (Source)
    This forum?
    You win (as long as you mean the forum in its entirety).

  6. #36
    To provide some context, this is part of a list of abilities and skills, which itself is a part of an official Master's degree in Belgium. They indeed mean to say 'has the ability to think' but I think the majority of people would take it the other way. I know I can 'dispose of my garbage' and that 'alcohol disposes me towards singing crude songs', but I myself have never heard of 'dispose of' meaning the exact opposite of 'dispose of my garbage'. So from my perspective it appears my employer proudly proclaims they have successfully removed their student's ability to think and that anyone holding the document is an idiot, but I wanted to check as I am not a native speaker.

    My take-away from the comments so far is that while arguably correct on a technical level, it may be much clearer to stop being pretentious and just say 'has the ability to think yadda yadda'.

  7. #37
    Originally Posted by Arry View Post (Source)
    He's been married for a few years now.
    Heh heh heh...

  8. #38
    Originally Posted by sleutelbos View Post (Source)
    Can any native speaker tell me what this sentence means? Thanks!

    "The gentleman disposes of the capacity to think."
    A rather nice and pleasant man with a polite demeanor is actually a doctor waiting to lobotomize his patient in a cool, calm and polite way ^

  9. #39
    Originally Posted by sleutelbos View Post (Source)
    Can any native speaker tell me what this sentence means? Thanks!

    "The gentleman disposes of the capacity to think."
    probably wrong translation (a 'faux ami'). the english meaning of 'dispose' as 'getting rid of' is a corruption. it stems from latin 'disponere', literally 'to arrange', and the original meaning is apparently conserved in english dictionaries, but not used. in other romance languages it means 'to arrange' as well as 'to have', 'to count with'. so, yeah, probably a sloppy translation from french.

    so they are actually requiring you to think!
    what sort of funny job is that???

  10. #40
    Originally Posted by sleutelbos View Post (Source)
    To provide some context, this is part of a list of abilities and skills, which itself is a part of an official Master's degree in Belgium. They indeed mean to say 'has the ability to think' but I think the majority of people would take it the other way. I know I can 'dispose of my garbage' and that 'alcohol disposes me towards singing crude songs', but I myself have never heard of 'dispose of' meaning the exact opposite of 'dispose of my garbage'. So from my perspective it appears my employer proudly proclaims they have successfully removed their student's ability to think and that anyone holding the document is an idiot, but I wanted to check as I am not a native speaker.

    My take-away from the comments so far is that while arguably correct on a technical level, it may be much clearer to stop being pretentious and just say 'has the ability to think yadda yadda'.
    Well uncle Lysan got it right, must be because i'm old and all that, there was also beer involved....

    https://forums.frontier.co.uk/showth...=1#post6779114

  11. #41
    I keep thinking the sentence either:
    Has at least one too many words
    Has at least one too few words
    Is a google/other literal translation

  12. #42
    Originally Posted by sleutelbos View Post (Source)
    To provide some context, this is part of a list of abilities and skills, which itself is a part of an official Master's degree in Belgium. They indeed mean to say 'has the ability to think' but I think the majority of people would take it the other way. I know I can 'dispose of my garbage' and that 'alcohol disposes me towards singing crude songs', but I myself have never heard of 'dispose of' meaning the exact opposite of 'dispose of my garbage'. So from my perspective it appears my employer proudly proclaims they have successfully removed their student's ability to think and that anyone holding the document is an idiot, but I wanted to check as I am not a native speaker.

    My take-away from the comments so far is that while arguably correct on a technical level, it may be much clearer to stop being pretentious and just say 'has the ability to think yadda yadda'.
    Hmm, removing the students ability to think. . . ? That sounds exactly like what my tutors were trying to do when I was at Uni!

  13. #43
    If it was Shakespeare it would be easy.
    It would mean all of the above

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