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Thread: I know exact reason why we WON'T have space legs.

  1. #61
    Well, the coffee dispensers present in many ships imply that there is gravity. Of course, they may only be usable inside a station... but then you would expect a warning sign of some sort?

  2. #62
    Muscle atrophy? By this point in the Frontier universe all of these problems have been solved. Muscle atrophy in space isn't a simple thing like having weak legs, it will eventually kill you since your lungs would stop working. Either drugs to stimulate lactic acid in the muscles, or electric stimulation could do it. Or the third option is that since adaptation works much faster than Darwin would have us believe, humans would actually be pretty good at living in space after a few generations. Nasa has already been monitoring DNA changes in astronauts experiencing zero G atrophy for extended periods, and the initial findings are indicating that even the first generation born in space will carry those adaptations.

  3. #63
    Iím almost 100% positive I recall reading some bit of lore something somewhere about the use of various pharmaceuticals to counter the muscle and bone atrophy associated with long-term exposure to microgravity, as anyone who knows about space knows thereís really no such thing as 0g.

  4. #64
    Yeah, there are lore reasons how humans operate without zero-gee for extended periods of time. Everything from pharmaceutical explanations to centrifuge conditioning during layovers in stations.

    But the OP's humour is well appreciated

  5. #65
    Originally Posted by Shiro Akai View Post (Source)

    the significant time we spend docked at stations, with artificial gravity from the station rotation.

    Extrapolating my personal experience - we spend more time in space than in 1g environment.


    Or the time spent landed on planets with gravity.
    0.04g or even 0.2g won't do much for your muscles. High gravity worlds - admit, how many you have visited and how much time you spent there?


    Or the high G-forces experienced during flight maneuvers.
    As I mentioned in thread starter - passive and short lasting to actually do something.


    Or the time that we can spend in deep space with the thrusters set to accelerate upward, providing as much as 1G or even higher accelerations.
    Again, how much time you spent thrusting up?


    Also all the exercises and other techniques designed to maintain muscle strength when the above possibilities are not being utilized.
    The only argument I can agree with. And already mentioned our suits that stimulate our bodies within flight. On a side note - how comfortable flying is when your legs twitch all the time due to muscle stimuli?

    LOL!
    You may very well be an outlier!

    Many Cmdrs I see are content to park in the station for hours on end.
    I suggest most even avoid long SC times.

    There is also nothing to suggest your experiences are typical, so that's all based on anecdote.

  6. #66
    "ALL YOUR SHOES ARE BELONG TO US" .. Colonel A. Triffid (Thargoid)

  7. #67
    Originally Posted by Winterwalker View Post (Source)
    "ALL YOUR SHOES ARE BELONG TO US" .. Colonel A. Triffid (Thargoid)

    That explains the origins of the mycoid virus

  8. #68
    We are jello people kept in shape by Remlok Tech!

  9. #69
    Originally Posted by Winterwalker View Post (Source)
    "ALL YOUR SHOES ARE BELONG TO US" .. Colonel A. Triffid (Thargoid)
    Why? Are they all made from Thargoid skin leather?

  10. #70
    Originally Posted by Vardaugas View Post (Source)
    We are jello people kept in shape by Remlok Tech!

    Speak for yourself!

    Cmdr Bob_Lighthouse does burpees on Achenar 3, and runs laps round Orbis station rings while waiting for the mission board to refresh.

  11. #71
    Originally Posted by Bob Lighthouse View Post (Source)
    runs laps round Orbis station rings
    "Hey Bob, I've seen you running all day. Getting places, enjoying the sights, eh?" - "That's funny. I actually haven't moved an inch."

    Wonder what that would do to rotation induced gravity.

  12. #72
    Originally Posted by Vardaugas View Post (Source)
    "Hey Bob, I've seen you running all day. Getting places, enjoying the sights, eh?" - "That's funny. I actually haven't moved an inch."

    Wonder what that would do to rotation induced gravity.

    Depends how fast you run I suppose...

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