Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Astronomers Discover a Free-Range Planet With Incredible Magnetism

  1. #1

    Astronomers Discover a Free-Range Planet With Incredible Magnetism

    A bizarre rogue planet without a star is roaming the Milky Way just 20 light-years from the Sun. And according to a recently published study in The Astrophysical Journal, this strange, nomadic world has an incredibly powerful magnetic field that is some 4 million times stronger than Earth’s. Furthermore, it generates spectacular auroras that would put our own northern lights to shame.
    http://www.astronomy.com/news/2018/08/free-range-planet

  2. #2
    Very interesting.

    A planet without a star ?

    My deep conviction is that Darth Vader is back with his death star


  3. #3
    Is it inhabited by a race of hyper-intelligent super chickens?

  4. #4
    Originally Posted by Patrick_68000 View Post (Source)
    A planet without a star ?
    Quite common, and there may be more of these than actual planets locked into a star systems gravity. This particular one would not be habitable, but various theories have been made on how humanity could colonise star-less planets in the future etc.

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by Zak Gordon View Post (Source)
    Quite common, and there may be more of these than actual planets locked into a star systems gravity.
    Possible with the billions of galaxies in the universe

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by amigacooke View Post (Source)
    Is it inhabited by a race of hyper-intelligent super chickens?
    That's the first thing I thought of when I saw "Free-Range"...

  7. #7
    I doubt chickens could evolve or survive in the atmsphere of a sunless Gas giant.There's no reason why such rogue planets may have or in the future may yet come from Sol system itself. The orbital dynamism is chaotic due to innumerable small bnodies and incalculable resonances of a multibody system.It's still not entirely certain how the Solar system actually formed (we understand the initial state and stellar birth etc. accretion process etc. but lack any deifinitive models for how the existing planets came to be where they are or were)The majority of attempted models typically result in one or more bodies displaced over time, or entirely ejected by gravitational slingshot. Next time, might even be earth that falls afoul of Sun's bouncer.Outside of fiction, I don't believe long term habitation is reasonably plausible. Beyond heliopause, the risk of harmful cosmic rays that could easily overcome the strip atmosphere are a main threat. In the above case, the size (and therefore mass) of the body wcombined with strong magnetic field provides a particularly effective barrier).Internal vulcanism and geothermal energies may be tapped to provide heat, but this would need to be transferred effectively to secure weather patterns in a controlled manner and seasoning in order to support agriculture on a scale to sustain life. Diurnal species would typically struggle unless artifical daytime was widely available, placing further strain on energy requirements. Much of the plants, then insectlife would die swiftly, reducing the capacity to support oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans, leading to mass marine extinctions.