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Thread: Keep old GPU as a physX card?

  1. #1

    Keep old GPU as a physX card?

    Is it worth it?

    I have a few titles that use physX (like metro last light, Batman etc...), Do you think there would be any actual noticeable benefit to keeping my old 1080ti as a dedicated physX card once my shiny new gpu arrives in a couple of weeks?

    Taking into consideration, the current resale price for a 2nd hand 1080ti in the UK is 250-350 (unless you're going to sell on ebay where they still fetch silly prices but as a seller you WILL get scammed), so not really worth the trouble of selling.

  2. #2
    What could it hurt to try?

  3. #3
    I'm thinking of doing the same with my 960 when I get a 10xx at the year's end.

    It'll be nice to continue using a card that's given me thousands of hour's enjoyment in some form.

  4. #4
    Been wondering, too.

    The question is always raised when there is a GPU generation shift, but this time, I feel that especially in VR titles, I feel I want every piece of clutter in every environment to be a physics object, rather than a load of "dead" statics, and I want the emulation run at greater resolution - both in terms of time division, collision geometry, and complexity, to get rid of much of the jank we associate with game physics, for more natural interactions.


    The question is how the bang-for-the-watt ratio comes out... :7 (I am sure my current PSU is not sufficient for two cards, either...)

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by jojon View Post (Source)
    Been wondering, too.

    The question is always raised when there is a GPU generation shift, but this time, I feel that especially in VR titles, I feel I want every piece of clutter in every environment to be a physics object, rather than a load of "dead" statics, and I want the emulation run at greater resolution - both in terms of time division, collision geometry, and complexity, to get rid of much of the jank we associate with game physics, for more natural interactions.


    The question is how the bang-for-the-watt ratio comes out... :7 (I am sure my current PSU is not sufficient for two cards, either...)
    That's what I'm wondering too, about the PSU.

    Mind you, it would be the perfect excuse to get a modular model in my case.

  6. #6
    Do games still support GPU Physics?

  7. #7
    Originally Posted by Necronaught View Post (Source)
    Do games still support GPU Physics?
    There's a list of games that use hw physics here

    While it's not a massive list, it does include a few games i play, like the witcher, metro and the Batman games.

  8. #8
    Originally Posted by Jon flint View Post (Source)
    There's a list of games that use hw physics here

    While it's not a massive list, it does include a few games i play, like the witcher, metro and the Batman games.
    Thanks, seeing ED is not on the list, I might actually be better off selling the 960.

    Some money back is better than none, of course.

  9. #9
    https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/t...5/post-3621887

    Only one game (as opposed to a synthetic PhysX benchmark) in that test actually benefited from a dedicated PhysX card vs. a single high-end GPU of the time. If anything a dedicated PhysX card is even less likely to be useful with a modern high-end GPU.

    Better off selling the card, putting it in a second system, or mining crypto on it to heat a room over the winter.

  10. #10
    Originally Posted by Morbad View Post (Source)
    https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/t...5/post-3621887

    Only one game (as opposed to a synthetic PhysX benchmark) in that test actually benefited from a dedicated PhysX card vs. a single high-end GPU of the time. If anything a dedicated PhysX card is even less likely to be useful with a modern high-end GPU.

    Better off selling the card, putting it in a second system, or mining crypto on it to heat a room over the winter.
    Just the info I was looking for, thanks