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Thread: A Mercurial Circumnavigation

  1. #31
    I hate low gravity in SRV.. I prefer a good grip rather then bouncing like a ball

  2. #32
    Some more driving and jumping. It's great having the ground disappear underneath you, and still be confident that the thrusters can save you.




    Originally Posted by Deluvian View Post (Source)
    I hate low gravity in SRV.. I prefer a good grip rather then bouncing like a ball
    I used to feel the same way, until I started getting a feel for this. Gliding over the terrain is absolutely wonderful.

  3. #33
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    Some more driving and jumping. It's great having the ground disappear underneath you, and still be confident that the thrusters can save you.

    Gliding over the terrain is absolutely wonderful.
    Totally agree, I absolutely adore the sensation (got your videos cued up to watch on the way home tonight).

  4. #34
    You guys are right.. just realized that this is not really flying/gliding that I do not like.. considering that I used SRV for material collection so far, it's the thing how mats would float for "hours" in low gravity worlds before you can catch'em I really like the idea of planetary circumnavigation but knowing me, I'd probably find the biggest possible planet to do this

  5. #35
    Originally Posted by Deluvian View Post (Source)
    You guys are right.. just realized that this is not really flying/gliding that I do not like.. considering that I used SRV for material collection so far, it's the thing how mats would float for "hours" in low gravity worlds before you can catch'em I really like the idea of planetary circumnavigation but knowing me, I'd probably find the biggest possible planet to do this
    Yeah, but half the fun with that is trying and catching them before they hit the ground

  6. #36

    Aristarchus of Samos

    Aristarchus was considerably ahead of his time. While he preceded Ptolemy, he is among the earliest to propose a heliocentric view, in which the Earth orbits the Sun. His ideas were rejected in favor of the incorrect geocentric models of Aristotle and Ptolemy, for centuries.

    Unfortunately much of his writings were lost. However Archimmedes references his works and describes his heliocentric ideas. Nicolaus Copernicus, who is credited with formalizing a heliocentric view of the solar system, also credits Aristarchus as the originator of the heliocentric theory.

    In addition to this, Aristarchus also correctly suspected that the stars were other suns, and that they were far enough away to have no observable parallax. This was unprovable at the time, since Stellar Parallax is only detectable with telescopes.

    Ironically, the only surviving work attributed to Aristarchus uses geometry to calculate the size and distance to the sun and the moon, in a geocentric view. His calculations were incorrect due to the lack of precision in the measurements he had access to, but his geometry was sound. The descriptions from Archimedes of his other works show that he had better numbers and calculations at other times, and his surviving work isn't the best example.




  7. #37
    Originally Posted by Alec Turner View Post (Source)
    Totally agree, I absolutely adore the sensation (got your videos cued up to watch on the way home tonight).
    It started giving me flashbacks of skiing in the Tribes games (Starseige Tribes, Tribes 2). Sometimes I would just ski away in some direction and see how long I could keep it up, touching the ground as little as possible.

  8. #38
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    It started giving me flashbacks of skiing in the Tribes games (Starseige Tribes, Tribes 2). Sometimes I would just ski away in some direction and see how long I could keep it up, touching the ground as little as possible.
    Actually I'm a skier in real life (with a penchant for getting off the beaten track) and bounding across vast tumbling landscapes in the SRV is the closest I've come to the mental sensation (if not the physical one) of actually being there.

  9. #39
    Originally Posted by Alec Turner View Post (Source)
    Actually I'm a skier in real life (with a penchant for getting off the beaten track) and bounding across vast tumbling landscapes in the SRV is the closest I've come to the mental sensation (if not the physical one) of actually being there.
    I don't ski in real life, but I know the mental sensation you're speaking of. I've been able to get tastes of it in the real world too when I used to ride horses (I took lessons when I was a teen) and would go into a fast gallop, and let the horse jump over logs and streams and the like.

    Tribes had something special, as far as games go. I always look for the aerial or semi-aerial things that can be done in games.

    As an aside: Tribes had jetpacks that would allow for extended jumps, but couldn't stay in the air for long. It took a lot of practice and skill to manage your jetpack energy, to stay up as long as you could, while touching the ground only for another jump without losing much speed. You would typically aim for a downward slope to land on, so you could get a gravity assist. Here's an example from youtube (normally you would play in first person, but it had a 3rd person camera too):


  10. #40
    Well, sticking with the slightly off-topic for a second, the simplest form of this is probably tiny wings.



    When you can get into a rythmn that allows you to use and play with the undulations of the passing landscape it's very satisfying.

  11. #41
    Originally Posted by Alec Turner View Post (Source)
    Well, sticking with the slightly off-topic for a second, the simplest form of this is probably tiny wings.

    When you can get into a rythmn that allows you to use and play with the undulations of the passing landscape it's very satisfying.
    Heh, I've never seen that one. That's really great, for something so simple!

  12. #42

    Progress continues! Last night I made it to about 0, -128.9, for a total of about 160 degrees covered. Almost, but not quite, half-way around. I've transitioned into the night side, so the evening's travel was all about watching the sun set.

    For this leg, I used the chrome SRV.

    Watching the sun slowly travel down to the horizon, and then disappear:












    And finally below the horizon, but some of the corona is still visible:




    And of course, I found a few more wrecks along the way:







    And some general scenery:










  13. #43
    Hi, me again! I watched your videos, great stuff, makes me instantly want to get back out there again. I can see you're already doing a great job of picking your landing spots (the side that's facing you of small smooth mounds) but I have a couple of suggestions for other skills for you to practice if I may make so bold. One is tilting the nose of the SRV down a bit when you're boosting in the air since it will aim your vertical thrusters backwards slightly and increase your speed (called "tilt boosting"). The other (and this is a really really good skill to master) is correcting your yaw attitude with a combination of pitch and roll. Basically, when you find yourself fliving somewhat sideways (crabbing) I can see you slowing down 'cos you know the landing could result in a skid and/or spin out. You can correct this in mid-air by pitching down, rolling towards the way you want to twist and then pitching back again. It's somewhat hard to describe and only comes with lots of practice but basically, the main thing with those bounces (especially at higher speeds) is to hit the ground facing as near as dammit dead square to your direction of travel.

    Here's a couple of videos that kinda illustrate me doing this if you watch closely ...



    As well as subtle corrections you can actually use the same technique to pull off mid-air 180's when a bad bounce spins you completely around. You'll see me doing this (and almost pulling it off - LOL) near the start of this next one.



    Practice makes perfect and one thing a planetary circumnavigator has is plenty of time to practice!

  14. #44
    Yeah, I already do those things, but don't bother as much when the terrain is relatively easy. I do need to practice them more though. Conceptually I have that all down. Executing it with finesse is the hard part.

  15. #45

    Copernicus

    Nicolaus Copernicus was a mathematician and astronomer, in the Renaissance era. His book De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres) brought about a revolution in science, with his heliocentric theory of the solar system. Interestingly, he was reluctant to publish it, despite the urging of his closest friends, because he feared the scorn that it would bring him. The dominant theory until then, was still Ptolemy's geocentric system of epicycles.

    Among the revelations presented in his book were Earth's rotation on its axis, the fact that Earth is a planet like the others in the solar system, and the correct order of orbits of the planets, from the sun outward. These ideas were not widely popular when he first published his theory, but it gradually took hold in secret.

    His system of circular orbits around the sun still had problems with accuracy, as the elliptical nature of orbits was yet to be discovered. He made corrections by retaining a set of small epicycles, which he called "epicyclets." However the correct ordering of the planets naturally fell into place, as he scaled the orbits of each planet relative to the Earth's motion. While he was mostly correct, and his theory could explain the retrograde motion of the planets in the sky, it couldn't fully prove the heliocentric model until Kepler later cracked the math behind elliptical orbits, eliminating the need for epicycles altogether. In the meantime, his model was comparable in accuracy to Ptolemy's model that was still in widespread use after more than a thousand years. Copernicus offered a much simpler system that achieved comparable results.






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