Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 76 to 81 of 81

Thread: A Mercurial Circumnavigation

  1. #76
    Knowing that the planet is slowly rotating relative to the sun, I swung back over to see if my "Olympus Mons" mountain was on the daylight side yet (without remembering what the coordinates were until I arrived and needed to actually find it). Nope, totally still dark. In fact, I think it's darker now.

    What surprised me is that I was able to easily land at the summit. Using the ship's altimeter, I could see that it was a measly 1.5 km altitude from the base of the slope. It just felt more impressive in the dark. However, since the planet is mildly potato-like, this area is at a high altitude overall, thus the drop in measurable gravity while on or near the mountain.



    It's not at all like this one, on another planet, far far away, that is 3km tall from its base:





    Not that it's particularly special either.

  2. #77
    Originally Posted by Orvidius View Post (Source)
    Knowing that the planet is slowly rotating relative to the sun, I swung back over to see if my "Olympus Mons" mountain was on the daylight side yet (without remembering what the coordinates were until I arrived and needed to actually find it). Nope, totally still dark. In fact, I think it's darker now.

    What amazed me is that I was able to actually land at the summit. Using the ship's altimeter, I could see that it was a measly 1.5 km altitude from the base of the slope. It just felt more impressive in the dark. However, since the planet is mildly potato-like, this area is at a high altitude overall, thus the drop in measurable gravity while on or near the mountain.



    It's not at all like this one, on another planet, far far away, that is 3km tall from its base:





    Not that it's particularly special either.
    I imagine I have flown over this in my search for volcanics. There are quite a few neat, but subtle features on this planet that are off the equator. Unfortunately, I think my search will end this evening with only about 60% of the planet surveyed as I am just about out of fuel in my ship.

  3. #78
    Originally Posted by Straha Yeagar View Post (Source)
    I imagine I have flown over this in my search for volcanics. There are quite a few neat, but subtle features on this planet that are off the equator. Unfortunately, I think my search will end this evening with only about 60% of the planet surveyed as I am just about out of fuel in my ship.
    Yeah, you gave it a good try. I'm not convinced that there's anything to find. I may come back again after the new exploration changes and see if the probe-mapping turns anything up.

    The subtle details on this planet are interesting, I agree. After driving through it, I was surprised how varied the terrain could be for a planet with only a few small mountains, rarely any canyons, and sparsely placed craters. This is making me realize that I probably just don't notice these details on most other planets too. I'll have to spend more time on the ground, or flying low, in the future.

  4. #79
    Hmm, I was just thinking last night (while stuck up a mountain) that it would be nice to have more tools in the SRV - an altimeter, for sure; a trip odometer would be nice, too. I had also decided to overfly my route when I complete the circumnavigation to get an overview of some of the more troublesome features - the mountain range that's giving me a lot of grief at the moment is literally invisible on the System Map image.

  5. #80
    And a SEXTANT dammit!

  6. #81
    Originally Posted by Straha Yeagar View Post (Source)
    And a SEXTANT dammit!
    Yes, indeed.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456