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Thread: Could 'Oumuamua be an extraterrestrial solar sail?

  1. #31
    I read an article somewhere that talked about a new telescope coming in 2022 (iirc?) that would be able to better get more info on Oumuamua. Anyone know more about that?

  2. #32
    Originally Posted by Zak Gordon View Post (Source)
    I read an article somewhere that talked about a new telescope coming in 2022 (iirc?) that would be able to better get more info on Oumuamua. Anyone know more about that?
    I think the James Webb space telescope is probably going to come online in 2022, I don't think the LSST which is referenced in the artechnica article is relevant to further investigation of 'Oumuamua itself, it is due first light sooner than that and is a survey telescope specifically designed to have a large field-of-view (hence the name Large Synoptic Survey Telescope).

    In the arstechnica interview the astronomer was pointing out that the LSST is much more capable / sensitive than the Pan-STARRS and so would have a greater probability of detecting similar objects / phenomena to 'Oumuamua.

    "Avi: {Avi Loeb} Exactly so the sensitivity of the telescope allows LSST to see smaller things. As a result it would see even more things and the question is to how many more objects that are interstellar it could find depends on the distribution of sizes. Those objects that we don't know it for sure but it will definitely be oldest of magnitude thousands or more, millions depending on the size distribution and that would open a completely new window into the origin of these objects because we will have a whole collection and perhaps even a small minority of those that look peculiar would be of great interesting."

  3. #33
    well it might be still interesting, imagine what would happen when voyager reaches another system with intelligent life. Would it already be covered in ice and rubbish so thick they would see it as a regular comet? If it passes such a systems star would it just emit gas like an usual comet?
    What if possibly other such objects passed us bu we never figure out it had an artificial object in itself?

  4. #34
    Most of the responses here remind of the times where as inhabitants of some hard to reach areas that have yet to see outsiders, think they are "GODS" of some sort when they do.

    An asteroid having a different shape than anything we've ever seen in our short history of observing asteroids and we think it's an alien device. I once found a rock that had a simular shape which is unlike any and all rocks I'd ever come across. And wrote it off as a rock perhaps I had come across any and all posibilites of rock formation before.

  5. #35
    Originally Posted by Cmdr Nemo LXXI View Post (Source)
    Most of the responses here remind of the times where as inhabitants of some hard to reach areas that have yet to see outsiders, think they are "GODS" of some sort when they do.

    An asteroid having a different shape than anything we've ever seen in our short history of observing asteroids and we think it's an alien device. I once found a rock that had a simular shape which is unlike any and all rocks I'd ever come across. And wrote it off as a rock perhaps I had come across any and all posibilites of rock formation before.
    Perhaps if you bothered to find out what was being discussed you would make less of a knee-jerk post. (I would describe it differently but I don't want an infraction.)

    The discussion was started because of a published study discussing the observation that 'Oumuamua was accelerating as it left the solar system.

    "Could Solar Radiation Pressure Explain 'Oumuamua's Peculiar Acceleration?," which recently appeared online – was conducted by Shmuel Bialy and Prof. Abraham Loeb. Whereas Bialy is a postdoctoral researcher at the CfA's Institute for Theory and Computation (ITC), Prof. Loeb is the director of the ITC, the Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science at Harvard University, and the head chair of the Breakthrough Starshot Advisory Committee.


    I think perhaps you should go back to examining your rocks.

  6. #36
    Originally Posted by Para Handy View Post (Source)
    I think the James Webb space telescope is probably going to come online in 2022, I don't think the LSST which is referenced in the artechnica article is relevant to further investigation of 'Oumuamua itself, it is due first light sooner than that and is a survey telescope specifically designed to have a large field-of-view (hence the name Large Synoptic Survey Telescope).

    In the arstechnica interview the astronomer was pointing out that the LSST is much more capable / sensitive than the Pan-STARRS and so would have a greater probability of detecting similar objects / phenomena to 'Oumuamua.

    "Avi: {Avi Loeb} Exactly so the sensitivity of the telescope allows LSST to see smaller things. As a result it would see even more things and the question is to how many more objects that are interstellar it could find depends on the distribution of sizes. Those objects that we don't know it for sure but it will definitely be oldest of magnitude thousands or more, millions depending on the size distribution and that would open a completely new window into the origin of these objects because we will have a whole collection and perhaps even a small minority of those that look peculiar would be of great interesting."
    Yeah it could have been the James Webb. Thanks

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