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Thread: why do asteroids spin

  1. #46
    Originally Posted by Patrick_68000 View Post (Source)
    Yes, why my avatar spin ?
    Shouldn't the galaxy be spinning in the game? This is an immersion breaker !

  2. #47
    Originally Posted by Lightspeed View Post (Source)
    Shouldn't the galaxy be spinning in the game? This is an immersion breaker !
    It is.

    It's all relative.

  3. #48
    Originally Posted by zn˘rt View Post (Source)
    i don't think that's true, if all particles in a belt had parallel orbits and identical momentum, accretion could not be possible in the first place. the very shape of belts indicates that roids must move relative to each other even if they tend to fall in line and settle over a very long time. collisions are a thing in real asteroid fields. the asteroid field lives!!
    One thing that always bugged be about the movie "Gravity" was the way the debris from the Russian satellite ripped the Shuttle apart and then, with it's next orbit, ripped the ISS apart as well.

    In a nutshell, you can't have things travelling at different speeds in the same orbit.

    It's vaguely possible that the fast-moving debris could have ripped the Shuttle apart while on a hugely elliptical orbit and then, at some point in the future, do the same thing to the ISS but it'd be years, or centuries, in the future.
    If the debris was moving fast enough to tear the Shuttle apart it would have to head wayyyy out into space (in an elliptical orbit) and then come back again and happen to be occupying the same bit of space that the ISS was - and it can't do that in the same time that the ISS makes a single near-Earth orbit.

    Similar thing with asteroids in rings.

    For an asteroid to occupy a ring-system it must be travelling in roughly the same orbit as all the other 'roids - which means it's also travelling roughly the same speed too.
    Trouble is, you're never going to get objects in orbit naturally travelling at precisely the same speed, or in precisely the same orbit either.
    Two asteroids might be moving at almost identical speeds, in almost identical orbits, but eventually they'll collide with each other (or another asteroid) and that'll change their speed and orbit again so they can drift off and do the same thing to the next asteroid they bump into.

    And, in the middle of all this, you've got new asteroids getting pulled into the ring-system by the gravity of the planet, hitting other 'roids hard with their first impact and stirring things up.

    For a ring-system to be stable, there probably isn't much happening "fast" (except for any newly captured asteroids) but almost every asteroid in a ring-system will be on a perpetual slow-motion collision-course with other asteroids so they'll all be tumbling through space, grinding against each other when they meet and then tumbling away again at a slightly different speed, on a slightly different orbit.

    The only thing "wrong" with ring-systems, in ED, is that all the 'roids "hold station" rather than moving around but, then again, unless you decided to hang around in a ring-system for months, you probably wouldn't notice the 'roids "moving around" anyway so it doesn't really matter.

  4. #49
    Originally Posted by Stealthie View Post (Source)
    The only thing "wrong" with ring-systems, in ED, is that all the 'roids "hold station" rather than moving around but, then again, unless you decided to hang around in a ring-system for months, you probably wouldn't notice the 'roids "moving around" anyway so it doesn't really matter.
    yes, it only really looks a bit weird on timelapses, while you're drifting through them in normal play it's just gorgeous.

    however my point is it would depend on how 'old' those rings are and how stable. i'm guessing not all belts in the galaxy are such. which makes me think, with the new seismic charges ... a simple miner could trigger a chain reaction and cause spectacular snooker havoc

    but, really, tracking each rock's orbit individually would be too much to ask, even for me!

  5. #50
    Originally Posted by zn˘rt View Post (Source)
    yes, it only really looks a bit weird on timelapses, while you're drifting through them in normal play it's just gorgeous.

    however my point is it would depend on how 'old' those rings are and how stable. i'm guessing not all belts in the galaxy are such. which makes me think, with the new seismic charges ... a simple miner could trigger a chain reaction and cause spectacular snooker havoc

    but, really, tracking each rock's orbit individually would be too much to ask, even for me!
    I guess it's unrealistic to expect a suprise Budong too?


  6. #51
    Originally Posted by avow555 View Post (Source)
    Seems a bit strange to me that asteroids spin.
    What force of nature would do that.

    From a gameplay point of view it seems it's been dropped in just for the visuals.
    Originally Posted by Captain Daryun View Post (Source)
    Why do planets spin
    Because it's fun.

  7. #52
    Why do asteroids in the Elite Universe spin, cos us numpties do silly things to them like:

    Shooting them with mining lasers and lances
    Bumping into them with our ships
    Blowing up other ships next to them (the debris has to go somewhere, some of that could hit asteroids)
    Smashing head first into them with our ships
    All those kinetic ammunition you shoot has to eventually hit something, guess what, it is the unfortunate asteroids!

    Now we can blow up the poor asteroids, that will teach them not to spin!

  8. #53
    Originally Posted by Stealthie View Post (Source)
    For a ring-system to be stable, there probably isn't much happening "fast" (except for any newly captured asteroids) but almost every asteroid in a ring-system will be on a perpetual slow-motion collision-course with other asteroids so they'll all be tumbling through space, grinding against each other when they meet and then tumbling away again at a slightly different speed, on a slightly different orbit.

    The only thing "wrong" with ring-systems, in ED, is that all the 'roids "hold station" rather than moving around but, then again, unless you decided to hang around in a ring-system for months, you probably wouldn't notice the 'roids "moving around" anyway so it doesn't really matter.
    There's the thing, ring systems aren't actually stable, a few million years is about it for ring systems. Of course that's ignoring other factors such as ejecta from nearby moons adding mass to the ring system.

    It works like this, while the gravitatonal effect of a single particle on another particle in a ring system is neglegible, the combined gravitational effect is quite large. For instance the inner edge of a ring is moving faster, sometimes much faster than the outer edge, so the combined gravitational pull of the rocks closer in are actually acting to accelerate the particles further out towards the edge, the slower particles at the outer edge act to slow the more rapidly moving particles towards the inner edge. The combined effect of this is that particles on the inner edge slow down and get pulled in towards the planet, the particles at the outer edge accelerate and maybe leave the ring system entirely, eventualyl the ring will thin out and be entirely dispersed.

    Movement relative to each other is possible but it certainly wouldn't be the wild crashing and bashing of the star wars films, impact between particles would be relatively rare. As I said earlier changes in Saturns rings are observable from earth based telescopes .

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-study-d...aturns-f-ring/

    Shepard moons would, however, cause a lot of perturbation, so moons close to the rings would stir things up a bit. Moons in ring gaps would speed up the inner edge of the outer ring and slow down the outer edge of inner ring, pushing particles in towards the centre of the ring to maintain the ring gap, so in theory if you want a quiet time stick to the centre of wider rings.

  9. #54
    Originally Posted by avow555 View Post (Source)
    Seems a bit strange to me that asteroids spin.
    What force of nature would do that.

    From a gameplay point of view it seems it's been dropped in just for the visuals.
    The asteroids in rings are all orbiting around its parent body, which is, in most cases, a gas giant. The ring itself is made out of debris and dust from other bodies and didn't just spawn into existence. There was force involved in the creation and there is still the one almighty, space and time bending force applied to them (to us here on Earth as well, by the way): gravity!
    Apart from that there is a lot of radiation around most gas giants and, believe it or not, it can move things around. Even light can. Not necessarily asteroids, but it shows that there are a lot of forces around.

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