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Thread: Will your next GPU be a Radeon VII (7)

  1. #16
    I've got two 1080 Ti's (in two separate systems) already, and my next upgrade will have to significantly out do these parts.

    Not sure AMD's next release will qualify, but the generation after that, maybe.

    2020 is looking to be a good year for GPU competition, with AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA all potentially having high-end parts hitting the market.

  2. #17
    The TDP / thermals is the big weakness of AMD on CPUs and GPUs.

    The day when they find the solution of this problem, will be a day of victory for them and for many new buyers.

  3. #18
    Originally Posted by Patrick_68000 View Post (Source)
    The TDP / thermals is the big weakness of AMD on CPUs […]
    That's not generally true. The Excavator family was stupid with their power characteristics, but both what came before (K10) and after (Zen) was and is quite fine and trivial to keep running stable with minimum effort.

  4. #19
    Originally Posted by Patrick_68000 View Post (Source)
    The TDP / thermals is the big weakness of AMD on CPUs and GPUs.
    At the higher-end, AMD parts generally have better performance per watt than Intel's currently.

    Intel has been keeping the same offical TDP rating in their mainstream hex and octo core parts by adding largely optional power caps to the turbo states: https://www.anandtech.com/show/13544...cted-tdp-turbo

    In practice, it's not hard for a high-end Intel part to exceed it's TDP rating by more than double, which is a drastic change from most earlier parts.

  5. #20
    Originally Posted by Morbad View Post (Source)
    At the higher-end, AMD parts generally have better performance per watt than Intel's currently.

    Intel has been keeping the same offical TDP rating in their mainstream hex and octo core parts by adding largely optional power caps to the turbo states: https://www.anandtech.com/show/13544...cted-tdp-turbo

    In practice, it's not hard for a high-end Intel part to exceed it's TDP rating by more than double, which is a drastic change from most earlier parts.
    Yeah. Intel didn't solder the heat spreader on the new i9 for reasons of being nice to the OC community.

    They simply had to or they wouldn't have been able to get it any faster than the the 8 series, if not less.

  6. #21
    A few rumours surfacing about the Radeon 7,

    No custom models
    Less than 5000 units will be made available
    64 rather than the (breifly) advertised 128 ROPs.

    https://wccftech.com/amd-radeon-vega...-fp64-compute/

  7. #22
    Wait, so what's the point. Genuinely puzzled. Like a collector's item? Oo

  8. #23

  9. #24
    Originally Posted by Jon flint View Post (Source)
    64 rather than the (breifly) advertised 128 ROPs.
    64 makes a lot more sense as it's a cut-down Radeon Instinct.

    There is no way they would make a whole new die flavor for a stop-gap gaming part.

    Originally Posted by Caramel Clown View Post (Source)
    Wait, so what's the point. Genuinely puzzled. Like a collector's item? Oo
    So they have something to sell in the upper-mid range/high-end segment.

    They already have the dies and boards, Instinct MII demand is already met. No reason to lose money on leftovers while allowing NVIDIA to have everything over 400 dollars to themselves.

  10. #25
    From what I can see now, it seems like they just have a stock of unused boards lying around. What I don't understand is why they are disabling certain elements from these boards to downgrade them. If they want to compete with NVidia, even if it's only limited amount of cards - why they don't just smash it and put boards with full functionality. As I understand, these cards are originally not quite what you'd call gaming cards. But it would be interesting to see how all the compute power would benefit(or not) gaming performance.

  11. #26
    Originally Posted by Caramel Clown View Post (Source)
    why they don't just smash it and put boards with full functionality.
    Because it would do little to improve gaming performance in even the best case scenario, would dramatically reduce yields (they wouldn't be able to use parts with defects and wouldn't be able to clock parts as high), and would cannibalize what professional market they have.

    The only fully enabled Vega 20 part is the MI60, which goes for $10k. The Radeon VII is going to be virtually identical to the MI50 (same functional units at higher clocks, only missing full ECC and FP64 support) which costs ~$5k. Virtually no games use FP64 and ECC reduces performance.

  12. #27
    Vega VII is Consumer version of pro MI60
    It Vega on 7nm with lot of HBM2.
    To me its a highly clocked small chip to get to 2080 performance wich means it draws a lot of power.
    I wait for more the more midrange Navi. I skip this 7nm try out .

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