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Thread: Elite: Dangerous Economy Map Spreadsheet

  1. #1

    Elite: Dangerous Economy Map Spreadsheet

    Elite Dangerous Economy Map



    CLICK ME


    WHAT IT IS

    This Economy map details the goods bought and sold relationships between the different economy types.

    It lists the galactic average for each commodity unit, highlights the highest value trade commodity of each economy x to economy y relationship and also highlights the highest value trade commodity of a given Economy type over all. Lastly it aims to track changing market trends via how each commodities price has shifted over time, in order to aid in making predictions on the next hot commodities.

    Using these you should be able to quite quickly devise different trade routes based on the most robust supply and demand relationships, while hopefully also giving an overall deeper insight into the finer details of how the supply chain works between economy types in ED.

    • All relationships are highlighted in Yellow.

    • Highest value trade commodities for a given relationship (column) have an X in the cell.


      • for example Extraction - Refinery has an X in Bertrandite. Indicating it is the highest value trade between the two Economy Types.


    • Highest value trade commodity of an overall System Economy type have an (X) in the cell.


      • For example. The Extraction colour band has an (X) in Palladium. Indicating that Palladium is the highest value commodity sold by the Extraction Economy Type.


    • Economy Types are colour coded by type and Commodity types are categorized for visual clarity.


    Every few weeks I'll be updating the galactic average prices and tracking shrink and growth trends over time.

    The base values are pulled from an old wiki article on commodities prices. I simply used them as a base to begin drawing comparison. It also now includes the current average prices as of 07/10/14 with differences listed for each commodity. Any of you that understand anything about economics will know why this will become pretty handy later on when trying to predict market trends once a few dates have been added to the current prices columns.

    It only has the 5 main economy types. Extraction, Refinery, Agricultural, Industrial, high tech. I did this partly because the others hold very little sway in the economy, and there are so few of the other types of economies on planets in the map, some not even existing in the current bubble, that I stuck to the main economies driving the trade at the moment. The service, Military, Terra-forming and Tourist economies currently play so little role in the overall economy that It wouldn't have added much to the spreadsheet compared to the amount of extra work it would have taken. (Although some have rightly noticed that silver and gold sales to tourist econs is currently a pretty lucrative endeavor ;) )


    HOW IT'S USED


    Usage

    The sheet is supposed to be read top down, and then referenced right to left. Each colour band is an Economy Type, named at the top. All yellow cells within a vertical section are commodities produced by that Economy.

    Each colour band consists of 5 columns referencing each of the 5 Economy types. so each column within each colour band expresses the buy-sell relationship between that economy, and the (colour coded) economy that column is nested within. Each Column is headed with an abbreviation to show which relationship it is expressing.

    For example. Extraction has 12 yellow cells, indicating it produces 12 goods. In the column Ext- Ref (Extraction to Refinery) of the extraction section we can see that there are 6 yellow cells in the Minerals Commodity Type: Indite, Uraninite, Bertrandite, Coltan, Bauxite and Gallite.

    So we can see that The Extraction Economy sells those 6 mineral types to the Refinery Economy type.

    We can Also see that of those 6, Bertrandite is the highest value commodity traded from Extraction to Refinery due to the X in the Bertrandite cell of the Ext- Ref collumn.

    We can also see at a glance that the Extraction Economy Deals solely in Metals and Minerals and also produces BioWaste.

    Route Planning

    So lets take a practical example.

    We want to create a round trade route covering all economy types, covering the highest trade commodity of each buy and sell relationship. Lets start at extraction.

    So in the extraction section we know already that Palladium is the highest value trade commodity. we can see that Palladium in this case is in the Ext - HT collumn. So our next port of call is the High Tech Section.

    The High Tech section shows that Progenitor Cells are the highest value trade. We can see that this goes to 2 different economies: Ref (Refinery) and Agri (Agricultural). So lets go and see which is best to go for.

    The Agri economy shows Tea as it's highest value unit. This goes to every Economy type. this would be a good choice if we weren't planning a specific route, as tea can be seen to have naturally high demand, it would be easy to pass of Tea cargo regardless of where we are in the galaxy. Tea comes in at an average of 1,470. This may be a good choice, but lets explore further.

    Refinery's highest value unit is Super Conductors coming in at 6,920. Ok so this is much better. We can see that Refinery sells Super Conductors to Industry and High Tech. Well we've already gone to High Tech, so we can make a decision to say after we have picked up our Super Conductors from a Refinery Economy, we want to head to and Industry system to drop them off.

    The Industry Economy shows that Marine Supplies is currently the highest value trading commodity, netting in at an average of 4,282. Low and behold. It exports to Agricultural Economy. Meaning we can hop off to our final destination, drop off the Marine Supplies and pick up a cargo full of Tea, ready to head back round to Extraction, closing the loop.

    So our final Round Trade Route is as follows:

    Extraction to Hightech - Paladium: 13,419c
    High Tech to Refinery - Progenitor Cells: 6,726c
    Refinery to Industrial - Super Conductors: 6,920c
    Industrial to Agriculture - Marine Supplies: 4,282c
    Agriculture to Extraction - Tea: 1,470c

    The idea being that you aim to get as far below those figures on buys and as far above those figures on sells as possible. the trick now is to find the right combination of systems on the map that is as close to this routes ideal as possible. Get searching!

    This is just one of many possible routes based on any number of economic relationships you may wish to devise based on your current situation. The point being that here is the necessary information presented in an easy to understand format, ready to be altered as the markets evolve.

    So you can see through proper use, this enables you at a glance to observe many market trends and relationships that would otherwise be quite tricky to notice. While allowing you to quickly make informed choices about potential trade routes as they relate to the inbuilt economic relationships.

    Of course these steps don't take into consideration specific system buy and sell prices as a reference to actual profits per trip. It aims to represent mean market trends and relationships, relying on the rule that higher priced goods generally net a larger profit margin, provided you find the right stations to buy them from.

    It is also wise to divide your current Credit balance by your cargo tonnage and balance trade route pit stops around the commodities with an average closest to that sum for each economy type.

    This is designed as an aid rather than a calculator, unlike certain other tools that take the fun of figuring your routes right out of your hands. This requires you still seek to find that elusive "perfect" relation of systems, where buys are low and sells are high. This simply aims to provide you with a clear to understand format that provides lots of information 'at a glance' while still being able to peered at closer and study to deepen your overall grip of how the economy system functions within ED.



    Fly Safe Commanders! Happy Trading.

  2. #2
    That is very interesting stuff. Thanks.

    So do you think the pattern about commodities from economy types is pretty rigid then? For instance do you think that Palladium can only come from a Extraction/High Tech economy? Or do you think it is possible that given the limited bubble it is just luck that the place(s) with it happen to be that type and others economies might produce it in the wider galaxy?

    Also any insight on stock volumes? linked to population?

    I like your point about deepening our understanding of how this works.

  3. #3
    Originally Posted by Half Giant View Post (Source)
    That is very interesting stuff. Thanks.

    So do you think the pattern about commodities from economy types is pretty rigid then? For instance do you think that Palladium can only come from a Extraction/High Tech economy? Or do you think it is possible that given the limited bubble it is just luck that the place(s) with it happen to be that type and others economies might produce it in the wider galaxy?

    Also any insight on stock volumes? linked to population?

    I like your point about deepening our understanding of how this works.
    I'm fairly certain that commodity types are very specific to the Economy types of planets. What's more is that the Planetary Economy Type will almost always be specific to the Planet Type.

    For example, Terran (Earth like) planets or aquatic planets will usually be Agricultural. Rocky Mars type planets and planets with rings will usually be Extraction/refinery e.t.c. This also has to do with the material composition of planets. I presume The chemical make-up of a planet will define whether it becomes, say, Extraction or refinery (being mainly metal or mineral base, but there are even discrepancies to this. Extraction economies produce a small number of metals, and refinery economies produce a small number of minerals) . Systems also have a secondary economy you can see when you dock at a station and I believe that will be to do with the combination of planets in the system, the types of planets they are, and the most practical forms of economy that should be there because of that composition.

    I'm pretty confident that specific commodities are generated by certain Economy types and can only be bought from them. Spending considerable time in the trade map in game and reading a lot of stuff about the markets has given me this assumption.

    For example, commodities are logical to the economy type they come from and go to.

    Extraction economies deal in minerals and basic metals. Refinery Economies deal in Metal compounds, fuels and conductors. Agricultural economies deal almost soley in Food stuffs. Industry deals in machinery, clothing, domestic appliances and Consumer goods. High tech deals in technology and things in other categories generally labeled 'tech'.

    Likewise, Economies also buy things logical to their presumed production processes. For example High Tech buys metal compounds, superconductors, heliostatic furnaces, Fuel. Everywhere buys food, except for Agriculture.

    Industry and Hightech economies produce scrap which refinery economies buy. Everything apart from High Tech produces Biowaste, which Agricultural Economies buy. They also buy things like "Aquaponic Systems" and "Animal Monitors" which are produced by High Tech.

    Everything seems to be logically thought out in terms of supply and demmand and logistical means of creating product through a supply network.

    Stock Volumes I haven't thought much about. But yes, I presume it's a combination of population and supply vs demmand.

  4. #4
    Jeez, I was exactly looking for something like this. +1 Rep from me, fantastic work!

    Edit: Sooooorry, misclicked, now you got -1 rep ) I hope you survive it... -.-

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by Falkenherz View Post (Source)
    Jeez, I was exactly looking for something like this. +1 Rep from me, fantastic work!

    Edit: Sooooorry, misclicked, now you got -1 rep ) I hope you survive it... -.-
    Haha classic!

    Worry not. Interweb reputation isn't very high up my list of things to be worried about. Thanks non the less, it's the thought that counts!

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by Epicurean Dream View Post (Source)
    I'm fairly certain that commodity types are very specific to the Economy types of planets. What's more is that the Planetary Economy Type will almost always be specific to the Planet Type.

    For example, Terran (Earth like) planets or aquatic planets will usually be Agricultural. Rocky Mars type planets and planets with rings will usually be Extraction/refinery e.t.c. This also has to do with the material composition of planets. I presume The chemical make-up of a planet will define whether it becomes, say, Extraction or refinery (being mainly metal or mineral base, but there are even discrepancies to this. Extraction economies produce a small number of metals, and refinery economies produce a small number of minerals) . Systems also have a secondary economy you can see when you dock at a station and I believe that will be to do with the combination of planets in the system, the types of planets they are, and the most practical forms of economy that should be there because of that composition.

    I'm pretty confident that specific commodities are generated by certain Economy types and can only be bought from them. Spending considerable time in the trade map in game and reading a lot of stuff about the markets has given me this assumption.

    For example, commodities are logical to the economy type they come from and go to.

    Extraction economies deal in minerals and basic metals. Refinery Economies deal in Metal compounds, fuels and conductors. Agricultural economies deal almost soley in Food stuffs. Industry deals in machinery, clothing, domestic appliances and Consumer goods. High tech deals in technology and things in other categories generally labeled 'tech'.

    Likewise, Economies also buy things logical to their presumed production processes. For example High Tech buys metal compounds, superconductors, heliostatic furnaces, Fuel. Everywhere buys food, except for Agriculture.

    Industry and Hightech economies produce scrap which refinery economies buy. Everything apart from High Tech produces Biowaste, which Agricultural Economies buy. They also buy things like "Aquaponic Systems" and "Animal Monitors" which are produced by High Tech.

    Everything seems to be logically thought out in terms of supply and demmand and logistical means of creating product through a supply network.

    Stock Volumes I haven't thought much about. But yes, I presume it's a combination of population and supply vs demmand.
    Very interesting. I have played a lot of Simutrans, that works using a similar approach. Can get pretty complicated.
    Love the way FD are modelling this economy. Seems that they are doing it so that the NPC traders do the logical thing, but also magnify the actions of the player traders.
    Anyway thanks for the spreadsheet.

  7. #7
    Nice work, this should be useful in my future space trucking endeavors. Thanks!

  8. #8

    Smile

    Originally Posted by Falkenherz View Post (Source)
    Jeez, I was exactly looking for something like this. +1 Rep from me, fantastic work!

    Edit: Sooooorry, misclicked, now you got -1 rep ) I hope you survive it... -.-
    I fixed that

  9. #9
    Edited the first post with some helpful tips on usage

  10. #10
    Updated the OP to make it more presentable and added the current galactic average prices to the map. As of the 07/10/14 they are accurate.

    I will now be manually keeping this online version up to date for those of you that don't want to go through the hassle of maintaining a version yourselves.

    I will be doing this probably once a week/two weeks depending on how slowly the markets shift.

    Cheers!

  11. #11

    Thumbs up Brilliant

    Without realizing it, this is exactly what I really wanted, not a "create the optimal cargo"-application.

    I was instantly frustrated by your formatting, so I created a new doc and referenced your data using the

    =importrange("1Zam5ytNdBn0JR2D-_OXDoIHh7pHMnxKkFcU1GTO9vSM";"A1:AD87")

    ...code in cell A1. That way I can snoop your data and add my own crazyness

    Any chance you could signify the data with actual data as well as your coloring(formatting is tricky to import than actual data)?

  12. #12
    Thing is, I tried to use it, but many systems do not seem to have all relevant commodities in suppy or demand. Therefore, captured or handnoted details about each commodity in each system are still necessary for composing an accurate route. As such, there still is a lot of trial and error. But better than nothing, of course!

  13. #13
    Lovely work
    But as above poster said not always available. I found that my experience of knowing what is where and when helps hugely and cannot be put in to a spreadsheet, e.g. I buy Consumer Tech from a station at a good price, the profit at the sale station is between 600-1000 per t . The return journey bags me min. of 350 per t profit.:smilie:

  14. #14
    Excellent work. I think this will be a great help for people wanting to understand how the economy works to make trade runs while not resorting to trade tools.

  15. #15
    This is a great help. Thanks to the OP for taking the time to put this spreadsheet together.

    In using this sheet to research trade routes, I'm wondering about the effect of a system's population on its economy. Some on youtube and elsewhere have suggested narrowing the search for trade destinations to systems with relatively high populations (~50m and above). But I have not seen any information linking system population to economy. I'm sure there is a link, but is it worth narrowing the search when using this spreadsheet to research trade routes?

    Any information OP or other players have would be helpful. Thank you!

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