Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Elite Dangerous Astronomy and Astrophysics Q/A

  1. #1

    Elite Dangerous Astronomy and Astrophysics Q/A

    Hello everyone! I am astrophysics cat(*). I am working my masters in teaching right now, but orginal my field of study was astrophysics and physics. So, I am physicist or lowly astronomer of shorts, but I am more of a teacher really. I really love this game alot and the people have met in it. Due to my love of the game, I am willing to answer any astronomy, astrophysics, exoplanet questions you might have(*) :D

    Just post your question below and I answer it when I have time.
    Example (from a Elite Stream):
    So badnewsbaroness and I saw a purple star, and we learned it was a brown dwarf. I was wondering is purple brown dwarf stars in this Elite Dangerous realistic?
    Answer: Yes, with a slight caveat, there are 'purple' brown dwarf stars called "T type" brown dwarfs or spectral class T. As many of you know Brown Dwarfs aren't brown because brown is not a true color (ex see: universetoday.com/23247/if-brown-isnt-a-color-what-color-are-brown-dwarfs/). The Brown in brown dwarf refers to the fact that we needed a color between red and black that represented a mixture, so we picked brown since brown since a mixture of desaturated colors. Most brown dwarfs are in reality reddish-orange. A few brown dwarfs are T type with a dark magenta color. The dark magenta of T brown dwarfs is caused by the absorption lines of sodium and potassium in the green part of the spectrum.
    The caviet is brown dwarfs are 'failed stars' with not enough mass to substain hydrogen-1 pp-chain fusion reaction (the lowest energy fusion reaction). So the purple brown dwarf you saw should not be very bright. However without seeing a color of the brown dwarf you saw in the game, I cannot really comment on if its too bright in Elite Dangerous or not.




    (*)within reason

  2. #2
    Cool idea for a thread.


    Why do you not feel/see the rotation when you are inside a station?

  3. #3
    Originally Posted by K Dizzle View Post (Source)
    Cool idea for a thread.


    Why do you not feel/see the rotation when you are inside a station?
    The same reason you don't feel the Earth move through its rotation. You're travelling at the same speed and you're not accelerating.

  4. #4
    I've discovered plenty icy planets and rocky ice planets with surface temperature beyond boiling hot (> 400-500K) and a thick crushing atmosphere. Is such planet type even physically possible? I mean, I have trouble wrapping my mind around this combo - shouldn't all the ice have vaporised long ago at those temps?

  5. #5
    Originally Posted by prophet1 View Post (Source)
    I've discovered plenty icy planets and rocky ice planets with surface temperature beyond boiling hot (> 400-500K) and a thick crushing atmosphere. Is such planet type even physically possible? I mean, I have trouble wrapping my mind around this combo - shouldn't all the ice have vaporised long ago at those temps?
    I don't have an explanation from surface ice but in deep ocean the sheer pressure of the gravity of larger planets will literally crush the water into ice. Yes I know that sounds weird but SCIENCE.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice#Phases

  6. #6
    Originally Posted by K Dizzle View Post (Source)
    Cool idea for a thread.


    Why do you not feel/see the rotation when you are inside a station?
    Because you have rotational correction on, it's a setting in the functions tab of your ship. Turn it off and the ship will rotate around you.

  7. #7
    Originally Posted by K Dizzle View Post (Source)
    Cool idea for a thread.


    Why do you not feel/see the rotation when you are inside a station?
    Originally Posted by Geers View Post (Source)
    The same reason you don't feel the Earth move through its rotation. You're travelling at the same speed and you're not accelerating.
    Originally Posted by Blast Hardcheese View Post (Source)
    Because you have rotational correction on, it's a setting in the functions tab of your ship. Turn it off and the ship will rotate around you.
    Both gears and hardcheese are spot on, you don't see space ship rotating because you, your ship, and space station are in the same moving frame of reference, rotating at the same speed; we have to consider the relative motion of objects. In fact we call the particular frame of reference you and the space station are in a rotating reference frame (picture in this link is important). The earth is a rotating reference frame and we don't feel it spinning. In fact, if you turn of rotational correction you would see the space ship spinning.
    The fact that you are in the same rotating frame of reference doesn't absolutely rule out that you might not see the effects of your rotating in real life and in the game. It’s just your so accustomed to seeing and feeling certain things on the spinning earth that you might not think about them being due space ship spinning.

    Observation 1: Artificial Gravity
    First, the space station's rotation is creating the artificial gravity holding your space ship down. Now, one way to explain this is to talk about how artificial gravity is the Newton’s third law force pair of your centripetal force. However, for nonscientists that explanation can be super confusing. To help explain a better way of understanding artificial gravity, I would like to share with you this video by astronauts on the international space station and this website link about the subject:
    As the station rotates, a centripetal force causes the angular acceleration and rotation of both you and edge of the station. However, you still want to move in a straight line due to Newton’s first law and your linear momentum. As the website and picture above shows, it is your tendency to move in a straight line that causes you push into the outer edge of the spacecraft. In real life, it would be possible feel this pull down and the adverse effects of the g-forces from your rotation. Now besides latching the ship to the station, I am not sure how far the developers can really stimulate the inner ears feeling of gravity or the effects of g-forces. As it’s an issue in real life, I also suspect that space stations in game are intentionally big then they need to be in order to prevent and limit the side-effects of g-forces. However, seeing if g-forces and all the affects of artificial gravity have been added space stations in game is something that a pro-player could probably test. All you would have to do is turn off rotational correction and find out what happens when you abruptly make a straight landing on a ship. I am not good enough pilot to make such a landing and not blown up by ship defenses. >-<;

    Observation 2: circumpolar stars and revolving objects outside the space station.
    Remember how I and Gears talked about how because your rotating at the same speed as space station, you cannot tell station is rotating? In other words, how you cannot tell space station motion because your relative motion is the same? We are assuming that there were no windows for you could look outside the station into space stars or see anything outside the station that might not be in the same rotational reference frame. If you were to look at the stars, perhaps the ones seen from the hatch you entered the station from, you should technically seem the slowly revolving or spinning. We call this stars that are spinning in this way Circumpolar stars. I believe actually see people look hatch before and see those stars slowly spinning though it’s at a really bad angle. The fact that there are circumpolar stars or even revolution of the stun means you are ‘seeing the ship rotate’.

    Observation 3: Coriolis effect of other ships docking/taking off.
    In real life, if you were in large space station like the ones from the game, the others ships landing and taking off would appear go in curved flight paths toward there docking stations. This is due to what physicists and meteorologists call the Coriolis effect, or the curved path that straight path objects seem to take because the viewer is in a rotating reference frame. The picture above shows well what the Coriolis affect is. Now, I have yet to tell if another ship actually follows the Coriolis effect because everyone I know is so bad at docking that they have to usually stop halfway and reorient themselves. In other words, I have not met someone who is good enough to dock from start to finish in a straight line. However, it should be observable.

    These 3 effects are all cause by you and the station rotating, even if you cannot see the station and yourself rotating.

  8. #8

    Icy Planet

    Originally Posted by Astrophysics Cat View Post (Source)
    Just post your question below and I answer it when I have time.
    (*)within reason
    Hi,

    Thanks for the offer !

    Is there ANY chance of discovering a metal rich or habitable planet further from a sun then the first icy planet ???

    I haven't seen one yet !

    If so, how would you explain it's presence closer to the sun then a non icy one ? elliptical orbit ? composition? system grab? ...

  9. #9
    Greetings Astrophysics Cat,

    Thanks for making your experience available to others. As someone who is just starting to learn about astronomy through Elite, I am likely to be asking you a number of questions.

    When checking out various objects to explore, e.g. the Messier objects, I notice that their location is given in spherical coordinates. For example, for my first journey I thought I would visit m45, the seven sisters. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades. As their location is given in (what I assume to be) spherical coordinates, but elite works in cartesian coordinates, I was wondering if you can help in converting the standard location description into the Elite coordinates.

    As a bonus question, do we have to take into account that objects move? ie does Ellite position objects where they appear to be, or where they are now?

    Nobbler the Wanderer
    http://nobblerthewanderer.blogspot.co.uk/

  10. #10
    In the past your excellent tool, thread has been added to EDCodex. Before EDCodex was released on the 17th of August you have received in the period 5th - 10th of August a PM with an invitation and a special link. After registering and logging in you would automatically become owner of your entry. According to the admin tool(s) you haven't used the special link (yet). Perhaps you have missed the PM or have been (temporarily) away from ED. Its also possible you choose not to claim your entry. Note: Its also possible to assign another commander editing rights for your entry. In either case please send us a PM. You can find your EDCodex entry here.

    Alternative way to get ownership
    The special link will cease to function in the (near) future, for security reasons. Should you after that point want to become owner of your entry you can use the "Claim ownership" button. In that case please send biobob or myself a PM with the email addressed you used for registration - for verification. You can also use this procedure if you no longer have the PM.

    What is EDCodex:
    Its a website with a database of currently approx 215+ tools,threads,websites,videos for ED. Any one can and is encouraged to add entries there. EDCodex is and should be community-driven. EDCodex companion thread. Its equally suited for PC's, tablets and smartphones and has RSS feeds.

    With kind regards,
    Biobob
    Wolverine2710

  11. #11
    Originally Posted by Astrophysics Cat View Post (Source)
    So, I am physicist or lowly astronomer of shorts, but I am more of a teacher really.
    What exactly does an astronomer of shorts do? It certainly sounds intriguing!

    Could one become, say, an astronomer of skirts instead?