Atmosphere entry idea - for if/when planets with atmo are implemented

so atmospheres typically generate heat upon entry, and not all ship are built with aerodynamics in mind. having your computer say something along the lines of "Adjusting shield geometry for atmospheric flight" might help to explain why your ship is not burning up and why your type 9 is gliding like a graceful swan instead of tumbling like the brick house it is. for extra points being able to see the shield switch and having it glow with heat effects and cost power to maintain its heat management would be awesome. also having the angular shield geometry resemble the original elites wireframe models would be a nice callback for the OG CMDRs out there.

minor sidenote: if your going the reduce the galnet stories maybe making the ones your do continue to be more in depth and better presented would be nice. for example have a news show video presentation with CGI reporters instead of a minor article?
 
About the Galnet: I sort of missed all those stories that seemed like they were going somewhere but never did.

About Atmospheric Landings:
Nice! I hadn't actually thought about the heat generated on entry. It seems like a good mechanic would be to make the shield take thermal damage, so that only ships with thermal resistant shields and boosters could make it through with shields intact. T-9 and similar ships may have to use planetary shuttle SLF's because of the lack of lift. things like cobra or eagle should be fine though.
 
Perhaps add a new hull bulkhead type, thermal tiles, which are weak to most damage, let you re-enter without a shield, (but only belly-first) and have high resistance against plasma accelerator rounds if they hit your belly.
 
Heat at reentry will not be an issues as our ships will not need to aerobrake. They can descend at a nice sedate speed which will not cause enough heat to hurt the ships which can happily fuel scoop from stars.

I imagine they will use the orbital cruise idea, then use glide with a slight heat incr are when going into the atmosphere and that's about it.

Remember, our ships have pretty much infinite thrust so therefore don't need to aerobrake and don't need to to reach orbital velocity speeds to get to space either.
 
The type 9 tumbles over high gravity worlds like a cinderblock with a rubberband powered propeller.
No ammount of shield geometry or areodynamics is gonna change that one.🤣

But shield geometry would be interesting in atmospheric worlds. Although the shield doesnt actually impeede the flow of oxygen as seen by the vaccum of space or suddenly having air pressure when you enter a station with a broken canopy.

If you are refering to the "glide" out of supercruise, your FSD controls that, not your thrusters. The ship's actuall kenetic energy doesnt change while the fsd is active. For example if you are traveling at 50c the ship's actuall kenetic energy is only a few hundred meters per second at most even though its being "moved" faster than light.
Its also why your ship resturns to speeds less than 2500km/s if the fsd deactivates or fails instead of continuing at the speed it was going while the FSD was active.
The FSD completely removes the need for any form of areodynamics during the main orbital drop because the FSD functions in 4th Dimensional space and air is a 3rd dimesnional object, the only thing that would stop the FSD in its active state would your ship colliding with a planet or an object with significantly more mass than your ship.

the FSD is secretly a doomsday weapon that can cause a planet to explode if your ship is going faster than light because of how speed/mass ratios work (the science behind it is kinda weird).
a ping pong ball can actually pierce a plank of wood and come out the other side completely unaffected if it is going fast enough. So the same principle would apply to your ship in this case.
 
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If we get atmosphere, I'll take unicorns kicking the screen in, or rainbows bouncing off the hood. I really don't care... :D
 
so atmospheres typically generate heat upon entry, and not all ship are built with aerodynamics in mind. having your computer say something along the lines of "Adjusting shield geometry for atmospheric flight" might help to explain why your ship is not burning up and why your type 9 is gliding like a graceful swan instead of tumbling like the brick house it is. for extra points being able to see the shield switch and having it glow with heat effects and cost power to maintain its heat management would be awesome.
Interesting idea. Would be great for gameplay. Doesn't really explain why my Type-9 (or any other ship I own) has no issues scooping from a Class O Supergiant, or will happily ride in the jet cone of one of the most violent environments known to man.

FD also designed the ships with such a ludicrous amount of normal space thrust, these ships have no requirement for stability from a lifting body/streamlined design.
 
Think how close we get to a Star after Hyperspace. Then think about the heat of reentry. I think frontier going to have to think about this.
 
I admit I did not think about the the heat of scooping feul lol. I guess our ships are pretty sturdy. maybe just a voice and special effects for entry into atmo then with no other changes. I just looked up some facts and it turns out the space shuttles reached just over 1500 degrees Celsius during re-entry and the surface of our sun is around 5500 C. interestingly the area immediately around the sun (where we would be fuel scooping) can actually get as high as 10 million C. and that's just our star. imagine a blue-white star!

(https://www.universetoday.com/103634/how-hot-is-the-sun/)
 
I admit I did not think about the the heat of scooping feul lol. I guess our ships are pretty sturdy. maybe just a voice and special effects for entry into atmo then with no other changes. I just looked up some facts and it turns out the space shuttles reached just over 1500 degrees Celsius during re-entry and the surface of our sun is around 5500 C. interestingly the area immediately around the sun (where we would be fuel scooping) can actually get as high as 10 million C. and that's just our star. imagine a blue-white star!

(https://www.universetoday.com/103634/how-hot-is-the-sun/)
I think if they do anything, it will be hull stress and having players control for the direction of re-entry. So most of the heat is on the bottom.

My dad used to work for Rocketdyne which is Boeing right now. We did get to play around with the Shuttle Heat shielding when I was younger.
 
I think if they do anything, it will be hull stress and having players control for the direction of re-entry. So most of the heat is on the bottom.

My dad used to work for Rocketdyne which is Boeing right now. We did get to play around with the Shuttle Heat shielding when I was younger.
That explains a lot. :ROFLMAO:
 
As has already been pointed out, the FSD moves the universe around you, not your actual ship. So entering the atmosphere of a planet like earth probably wouldn't be that much different than a planet with no atmosphere, as our atmosphere isn't really that dense. That said, a lot of planets out there have MUCH denser atmospheres. Your FSD would have a harder time moving all of that matter around you, thus resulting in the need for less steep angles as you descend to the surface to prevent your FSD from overheating. Nonetheless, Frontier is going to have to put a flame effect on the outside of our cockpits. Ignore the fact that it doesn't make physical sense in this situation, it has to be there. :D
 
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