Australian Dinosaurs

Yes, I totally agree Australia needs representation. It would be quite odd, and a missed opportunity to have one species representing Australia, and not having at least a couple more in the game. Hopefully in some future Dinosaur DLC pack, one or more dinosaurs from Australia could be introduced into the game.
 
I feel like we need an Australian dinosaur pack because we only have Muttaburasaurus

My picks are

Austrovenalator
Austrosaurus
Leaellynasaura
Minmi
Qantassaurus
Atlascopcosaurus

A mixed bunch to stick with adding dinosaurs people are and are not familiar with

I couldn't agree more with you, I would absolutely love more Australian dinosaurs in the game, I couldn' t choose from your list because these are all beautiful animals that deserve a representation in this game
 
I imagine there's only really potential for one or two more Australian dinos (they'd have to really go out of their way otherwise, for example making Rhoetosaurus into basically a Shunosaurus or making Qantassaurus into a hopping dinosaur).

The only two that seem somewhat often suggested are Australovenator and Minmi, with both likely needing a fair bit done to them to set them apart.

Leaellynasaura has some interesting elements to it such as the really long tail (kind of optional nowadays), long head shape in modern reconstructions, or giant eyes of the old reconstructions, so there might be a chance of it being picked based on those grounds, though I imagine they still might feel the need to tweak something.
 
I even mentioned that cryolophosaurus should be added to the Queen'sland dig sites of Australia even though it's not scientifically accurate Antarctica is not in the game or on the map so I kind of had to mention this because well why not use Australia being closest to Antarctica.
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I even mentioned that Cryolophosaurus should be added to the Queensland dig sites of Australia even though it's not scientifically accurate Antarctica is not in the game or on the map so I kind of had to mention this because well why not use Australia being closest to Antarctica.
Seems reasonable, it's a connected landmass, with the Queensland tetrapod sites (Evergreen Fm. & Marburg Sandstone) seeming to be of pretty similar latitude at the time.

The Evergreen Fm. seems the most diverse tetrapod site, having Siderops, a millipede and a plesiosaur, though in a realistic sense it's probably just that little bit too young to actually have potential for finding a species of Cryolophosaurus (Late Pleinsbachian to Toarcian compared with the Late Sinemurian to Early Pleinsbachian of the Hanson Fm.) and there's also the issue of the main fossil layers being Ironstone, which is tough to get through.

That said only the Razorback beds seem to match the age, but only have footprints (incl. Theropod), rather than any body fossils.
 
I love dinosaurs, and i live in australia so I'm always wondering Why are aussie dinos so small? However Kronosaurus is the most famous australian prehistoric reptile.
if you were to put in aussie dinos you'd need the kronosaurus
 
I love dinosaurs, and i live in australia so I'm always wondering Why are aussie dinos so small? However Kronosaurus is the most famous australian prehistoric reptile.
if you were to put in aussie dinos you'd need the kronosaurus
Australia was polar at the time and attached to Antarctica, the seasonal variability in vegetation growth might have something to do with dinosaur size, there was also an inland sea for most of the time we have dinos from, which would have limited land a bit.

There are still largish dinosaurs, the largest named one is a more or less a tie between Savannasaurus and Rhoetosaurus, being more medium sized sauropods at about 15m long. From footprints, there's even one estimated to be about 18m long apparently, and technically Austrosaurus has been estimated at about 20m long. The largest carnivore we have is Rapator, estimated at 9m long, so roughly Baryonyx sized.

With the Australian dinosaurs, it's more that they aren't found in many places, basically all the discoveries in the last ten or fifteen years have been from central Queensland and southern Victoria.

There are also Western Australian dinosaur sites known, one around Exmouth and one even close to Perth, but I'd say they probably aren't going back to them for a while, with the Gogo reef being the much more popular draw for palaeontology (also there's likely crocodiles around Exmouth for part of the year, and a river near that site).

I'm not confident about getting anything outside of the Mosasaurus marine animal wise (for this game anyway, sequel might change things), same goes for Aerial creatures outside of the Pteranodon. That said, Koolasuchus is another pretty iconic one, being likely the last of it's kind.
 
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There are still largish dinosaurs, the largest named one is a more or less a tie between Savannasaurus and Rhoetosaurus, being more medium sized sauropods at about 15m long. From footprints, there's even one estimated to be about 18m long apparently, and technically Austrosaurus has been estimated at about 20m long. The largest carnivore we have is Rapator, estimated at 9m long, so roughly Baryonyx sized.
The Broome trackways indicate that gigantic sauropods in the same size class as Argentinosaurus and Maraapunisaurus (combined track of the foot and hand is 1.7 m long) we're plodding around Western Australia during the Valangian-Barremian.

WA museum crew visited the Exmouth fossil sites last year and collected lots of shark teeth and some cruddy marine reptile remains.
 
The Broome trackways indicate that gigantic sauropods in the same size class as Argentinosaurus and Maraapunisaurus (combined track of the foot and hand is 1.7 m long) we're plodding around Western Australia during the Valangian-Barremian.

WA museum crew visited the Exmouth fossil sites last year and collected lots of shark teeth and some cruddy marine reptile remains.
It's good to hear they're still trying with those sites, it'll be interesting to see if we ever get more of that theropod (by the sounds probably not though).

I thought I heard of a sauropod around that size, couldn't find it though, that said I'm not very observant.
 
It's good to hear they're still trying with those sites, it'll be interesting to see if we ever get more of that theropod (by the sounds probably not though).
If you mean the Miria Formation "theropod humerus", that now is clearly a marine turtle (which was the original identification). There are earlier theropod scraps from further south (Kalbarri, Gingin and Ozraptor from near Geraldton).
 
If you mean the Miria Formation "theropod humerus", that now is clearly a marine turtle (which was the original identification). There are earlier theropod scraps from further south (Kalbarri, Gingin and Ozraptor from near Geraldton).
That's good to know, the Miria Fm. one is what I was referring to.

It really does feel like I don't pay attention to these things.
 
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