Cyberpunk 2077 - official gameplay

Must. Be. Strong.
Must. Not. Install. Windows.

I finally gave up the ghost of an argument, and bought my first PC.

It was supposedly just for ED (my old iMac could just about play it, but with some horrible low-res textures), but now that I have a great gaming PC, I find I'm playing other games instead of ED... Ah, well, at least I'm set up for Cyberpunk...assuming it comes out in the next 3-4 years. :)
 
I reckon if I can somehow save £700 that I don't need for other things between now and November, I should be OK to pull the trigger on it.

Holy smokes a console already costs 700 british pounds?!? :eek:

I always thought the point of buying a console was to avoid having to spend a lot of money to play games.


edit: just to make it clear, I'm not taking a stab at consoles, I'm just surprised that they already cost so much.
 
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I always thought the point of buying a console was to avoid having to spend a lot of money to play games.

The point of buying a console is to avoid having to know how to use a computer or having to use Windows...though I suppose there may still be an argument for certain exclusive titles. Unless you buy an old console, then the point is to be a pretentious hipster, or a 'collector'.

Consoles haven't been that much cheaper, from a total cost of ownership perspective, for a long time...mostly due to peripheral and software costs.

Of course, it's possible to waste a lot of money on a PC by buying hardware that is largely redundant for gaming or falling prey to gimmicks, but if you know what you're doing, it's probably the cheapest way to play video games...but that comes back to knowing something about computers.
 
The point of buying a console is to avoid having to know how to use a computer or having to use Windows...though I suppose there may still be an argument for certain exclusive titles. Unless you buy an old console, then the point is to be a pretentious hipster, or a 'collector'.

Consoles haven't been that much cheaper, from a total cost of ownership perspective, for a long time...mostly due to peripheral and software costs.

Of course, it's possible to waste a lot of money on a PC by buying hardware that is largely redundant for gaming or falling prey to gimmicks, but if you know what you're doing, it's probably the cheapest way to play video games...but that comes back to knowing something about computers.

As an ex console gamer, 15-20 years ago it was really the plug and play plus some exclusives that have driven me to them, plus at that time PCs were much more difficult to maintain. On top of it, it is easy to pack them up and carry around.

Today, however, it is completely different. I can do basic maintenance and part swaps and installing Windows is not much more difficult than booting up a console - plus we have stuff like Steam that are miles better than any console store. Sure, obscure issues may pop up, but the system is fairly stable. Also, console exclusives nowadays are only story driven 'rail shooters' like the Last of Us, that are more like interactive movies - and I don't really like these games with a very few exceptions. PC, however, has loads of other stuff like strategy games, quality VR, sims and whatnot. Plus, I can stream my games to my corporate laptop basically anywhere where there is decent internet.

The issue with PC is that you can always find something to upgrade a bit, a new VR set here, better GPU there, then a new monitor... proper money pit. :)
 
As an ex console gamer, 15-20 years ago it was really the plug and play plus some exclusives that have driven me to them, plus at that time PCs were much more difficult to maintain. On top of it, it is easy to pack them up and carry around.

Today, however, it is completely different. I can do basic maintenance and part swaps and installing Windows is not much more difficult than booting up a console - plus we have stuff like Steam that are miles better than any console store. Sure, obscure issues may pop up, but the system is fairly stable. Also, console exclusives nowadays are only story driven 'rail shooters' like the Last of Us, that are more like interactive movies - and I don't really like these games with a very few exceptions. PC, however, has loads of other stuff like strategy games, quality VR, sims and whatnot. Plus, I can stream my games to my corporate laptop basically anywhere where there is decent internet.

The issue with PC is that you can always find something to upgrade a bit, a new VR set here, better GPU there, then a new monitor... proper money pit. :)
I was the same...during my extended stay in a military hospital where we all got into Xbox's playing Battlefield, when I came out of hospital in 2003, my PC wasn't worth upgrading and the cost of doing so was a much more prohibitive venture than simply buying an Xbox...I pulled the trigger, sold off most of my PC flight sim peripherals, bought an Xbox 360 and stayed doggedly with Xbox for the remaining years up to 2016.

I started off playing Elite on the Xbox one during GPP in 2015...stayed with it for a year before the desire for flight sims outside of ED...plus being able to apply mods and generally fiddle around with the games I play outside of the closed and restrictive Microsoft Xbox system drove me back to PC. I bought all the bits (and all the peripherals once again) and built myself a new one..the basic knowledge gained over years of building PC's never leaves you as I found. My only difficulty was the apparent inability to use a mouse and keyboard for FPS or action based games...muscle memory from years on the Xbox using a controller had stripped the M/KB ability from my brain...still much the same today.

As it is, I still have an Xbox one X seated quite nicely under my monitors...bought for RDR2 I should add since I gave my old Xbone to a friend for his kids. I don't use it much since RDR2 appeared on PC the year after it was released for consoles. What I found with a good few of the console players in the Xbox community was the preferred ease and comfort of console gaming...driving the gaming pastime from the man cave in the spare bedroom and into the living room sitting on the comfy couch in front of the posh 55" 4K TV's...and fighting with spouses over the use of the TV :D

All in all, I still prefer the Mole Cave...always had the Xbox in here when I played it and via a monitor rather than the TV...some habits die harder than others ;)
 
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Of course, it's possible to waste a lot of money on a PC by buying hardware that is largely redundant for gaming or falling prey to gimmicks, but if you know what you're doing, it's probably the cheapest way to play video games...but that comes back to knowing something about computers.

True, that's why I still buy my PCs at old school dedicated computer shops, where I can choose individual components myself instead of pre-assembled machines at generic stores. I do have to admit I no longer have the patience to assemble it myself, nowadays I prefer to pay an extra 30€ and come back a few hours later to pick it up. :D
 
True, that's why I still buy my PCs at old school dedicated computer shops, where I can choose individual components myself instead of pre-assembled machines at generic stores. I do have to admit I no longer have the patience to assemble it myself, nowadays I prefer to pay an extra 30€ and come back a few hours later to pick it up. :D
:D Yeah, I guess we become a bit lazy with age. I rather pay some extra to not have to deal with setup stuff today too.
 
For me, building the system has always been half the fun of having it.

If there is a lull in my gaming, I can always rebuild the machines better than before. I have the technology. Though I do occasionally end up fixing them until they break and have to get new toys.
 
For me, building the system has always been half the fun of having it.

If there is a lull in my gaming, I can always rebuild the machines better than before. I have the technology. Though I do occasionally end up fixing them until they break and have to get new toys.
This.

Plus if some store worker built my PC, I'd probably still take it apart and check if it's built properly. :LOL:
 
Holy smokes a console already costs 700 british pounds?!? :eek:

I always thought the point of buying a console was to avoid having to spend a lot of money to play games.


edit: just to make it clear, I'm not taking a stab at consoles, I'm just surprised that they already cost so much.

No. Well, at least I hope not. Sony haven't announced their pricing yet.

I reckon it'll be £400 or possibly £500 at a push. Any higher and I doubt they'd get a sale. I said £700 because if I'm buying something like that, I'd want headroom for 'extras' - e.g. an extra controller (~£50), or VR (~£300), or an extra SSD (~£200).

And then the games themselves are not cheap.

PC is still the cheapest way to game, if you know what I mean. ;)
 
This.

Plus if some store worker built my PC, I'd probably still take it apart and check if it's built properly. :LOL:

Mine was also prebuilt on custom(ish) specifications, and the cable management, whatsoever is really well done. The only issue was that they applied a thermal paste that probably came with the cooler - after I applied a better one temps dropped almost 10C. And I paid less than €15 too. :)
 
For me, building the system has always been half the fun of having it.

That used to be true for me as well, I used to feel a sense of accomplishment when I finished and the board only beeped once, and everything was running. A bit like when I feel when I finish one of my weekend trekking climbs and reach the top of a hill or mountain.

But I became (even) lazier with time :) That and 20 years working in IT, when I get home I only want to use computers for leisure... Nowadays I only do the upgrades (or basic troubleshooting) myself when it's just adding / swapping disks, cards or memory slots. Everything else I just rather lose the 30€.
 
That used to be true for me as well, I used to feel a sense of accomplishment when I finished and the board only beeped once, and everything was running. A bit like when I feel when I finish one of my weekend trekking climbs and reach the top of a hill or mountain.

But I became (even) lazier with time :) That and 20 years working in IT, when I get home I only want to use computers for leisure... Nowadays I only do the upgrades (or basic troubleshooting) myself when it's just adding / swapping disks, cards or memory slots. Everything else I just rather lose the 30€.

I'm a software developer - so I'm supposed to "know" about computers. And I do, kinda. Because of that, I've always built my own PC except for one time where I bought all the parts and asked them to do it for £30.

Building a PC is relatively easy if you know what's what and follow the motherboard instructions carefully. Nothing can really go wrong. My problem is always the cable management, and trying to keep the motherboard as 'clean' as possible so as not to obstruct airflow, which can quickly kill a high powered PC.

But that PC I had built for me was beautiful. Obviously I opened it up and checked everything when I got it back, and the difference between that and my usual spaghetti builds was stark. Money well spent, and I'd definitely do it again. Because I have genuinely grown to hate PCs. :LOL:
 
and 20 years working in IT, when I get home I only want to use computers for leisure...

This is why I try to work as little as possible. I either hate it from the get go, or it slowly transforms something I enjoy into something I resent.

I'm a software developer - so I'm supposed to "know" about computers. And I do, kinda.

People frequently, often dramatically, overestimate my ability with the software side of things, just because I know the hardware side of things.

I don't think most laymen make many distinctions between the myriad of subtopics possible within the overarching computing/IT field. The same people that are disappointed when they find out I can't program much of anything and am not a 'hacker' tend to be the same people that are astounded that I can swap the platters and logic board on a mechanical HDD to bypass a dead spindle motor or head actuator long enough to recover data; reflow the solder on their XBox 360 GPU to fix their RROD; build a cooling loop out of a heatercore and spare garbage; or that I bin my own DRAM. It's kinda like the PvP vs. PvE arguments in the ED forums where one subgroup is always like "why not CQC?!".
 
I don't think most laymen make many distinctions between the myriad of subtopics possible within the overarching computing/IT field. The same people that are disappointed when they find out I can't program much of anything and am not a 'hacker' tend to be the same people that are astounded that I can swap the platters and logic board on a mechanical HDD to bypass a dead spindle motor or head actuator long enough to recover data; reflow the solder on their XBox 360 GPU to fix their RROD; build a cooling loop out of a heatercore and spare garbage; or that I bin my own DRAM. It's kinda like the PvP vs. PvE arguments in the ED forums where one subgroup is always like "why not CQC?!".

Well, tbf, that's pretty impressive even for an IT guy.

I started in IT, but moved out of it pretty quickly when it became obvious that "IT support" meant "anything with a plug". So everything from rackmount servers, green screen terminals (yes indeed), RS232 cables, all the way down to photocopiers and coffee machines.
 
I'm a software developer - so I'm supposed to "know" about computers....

...the difference between that and my usual spaghetti builds was stark. Money well spent, and I'd definitely do it again. Because I have genuinely grown to hate PCs. :LOL:

100% my experience!

As an ex software developer I'll have nothing to do with tin! It's the old joke. 'How many software engineers does it take to change a lightbulb? Sorry mate, we don't do hardware.'

As for hating PCs. I think I always have tbh - I still think the mouse is fantastic for certain uses, but very inefficient in many others, particularly form filling. Unix servers and in the old days mainframes, are a different kettle of fish entirely, and a joy to play with and build a high-resilience system on. Shame that the Tandem systems fell out of use - so much resilience was built in.
 
But that PC I had built for me was beautiful. Obviously I opened it up and checked everything when I got it back, and the difference between that and my usual spaghetti builds was stark.
^^^
So very much this.

I built my own PCs from the motherboard up from when I left college, until 2012, when I was pricing components online. The computer site I was on at the time offered custom built PCs, and it wasn’t that much more for them to do it for me. When it arrived, I naturally cracked it open and looked inside. The cabling was a thing of beauty. Mine tended to resemble Grodion’s Knot.
 
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