Cyberpunk 2077 - official gameplay

This is why I try to work as little as possible. I either hate it from the get go, or it slowly transforms something I enjoy into something I resent.
I've been working in software for 20 years, and even though I was quite passionate about it in the first 10/15 years, my interest has declined steeply for the past 5... Since I'm only turning 40 in a couple weeks, sometimes I dread what the future will be, since I still got another 28 years to go (at least - retirement minimum age keeps increasing). I'm not even halfway and I'm already losing my spark, I can't possibly imagine how fed up I will be in 10 or 20 years.
 
I've been working in software for 20 years, and even though I was quite passionate about it in the first 10/15 years, my interest has declined steeply for the past 5... Since I'm only turning 40 in a couple weeks, sometimes I dread what the future will be, since I still got another 28 years to go (at least - retirement minimum age keeps increasing). I'm not even halfway and I'm already losing my spark, I can't possibly imagine how fed up I will be in 10 or 20 years.
I know this probably isn't a smart advice, especially right now, but if you feel burnt out, I think it would be wiser to start thinking about a change as soon as possible.
If you leave it another 10, 15 years and then decide you can't take it any more, at 55 you will have much harder time both finding a job and retraining.
So.. something to think about, I guess.
 
I've been working in software for 20 years, and even though I was quite passionate about it in the first 10/15 years, my interest has declined steeply for the past 5... Since I'm only turning 40 in a couple weeks, sometimes I dread what the future will be, since I still got another 28 years to go (at least - retirement minimum age keeps increasing). I'm not even halfway and I'm already losing my spark, I can't possibly imagine how fed up I will be in 10 or 20 years.
Totally this. It's become a young person's game for young, bright minds. I'm 48 in a month, and I've been feeling that way for about a decade. Wish I could say it gets easier. 🤷‍♀️
 
Totally this. It's become a young person's game for young, bright minds. I'm 48 in a month, and I've been feeling that way for about a decade. Wish I could say it gets easier. 🤷‍♀️
stick to the young. i'm close to 56 and retired early a couple of years ago, but close contact with those youngsters is what kept it alive and half interesting to me for the last leg. yes, they get easily carried away by every fad and will make you facepalm a lot, but they're also fun and their energy and passion can actually be good company. there's definitely stuff to learn and it goes both ways, if you have a little patience they will appreciate some calm insight too. i still hang out with some of them today.

software was a peaceful craft when i started. now it's mostly a flying circus with the appearance of a certified industry. coders are bombarded non stop with insane crap about productivity and everyone being replaceable and whatnot, dragged into what is actually managerial stuff which an apparently ever growing horde of management roles can't handle alone for some reason. the industry's interpretation of agile is a freaking babel tower.

but people still enjoy meaningful personal relationships and sharing puzzles together, you only need some space: pick your allies, stick to the trooper types and form a bubble together to shield you from all the bullcrap and enjoy your work. plus, someone has to actually do the job and it won't be the butterflies ...this is no small thing, it actually gives meaning to being there to begin with.

also, remember:

he said, "The thing about depression is
well, you just can't let it get you down
you have to see the world for what it is:
a circus full of freaks and clowns

and you'll never please everybody
it's a well established fact."
he said, "I recommend a fifth of Jack
and a bottle of
Prozac"



and if everything fails, just switch job/profession! 😂
 
stick to the young. i'm close to 56 and retired early a couple of years ago, but close contact with those youngsters is what kept it alive and half interesting to me for the last leg. yes, they get easily carried away by every fad and will make you facepalm a lot, but they're also fun and their energy and passion can actually be good company. there's definitely stuff to learn and it goes both ways, if you have a little patience they will appreciate some calm insight too. i still hang out with some of them today.

software was a peaceful craft when i started. now it's mostly a flying circus with the appearance of a certified industry. coders are bombarded non stop with insane crap about productivity and everyone being replaceable and whatnot, dragged into what is actually managerial stuff which an apparently ever growing horde of management roles can't handle alone for some reason. the industry's interpretation of agile is a freaking babel tower.

but people still enjoy meaningful personal relationships and sharing puzzles together, you only need some space: pick your allies, stick to the trooper types and form a bubble together to shield you from all the bullcrap and enjoy your work. plus, someone has to actually do the job and it won't be the butterflies ...this is no small thing, it actually gives meaning to being there to begin with.

also, remember:

he said, "The thing about depression is
well, you just can't let it get you down
you have to see the world for what it is:
a circus full of freaks and clowns

and you'll never please everybody
it's a well established fact."
he said, "I recommend a fifth of Jack
and a bottle of
Prozac"



and if everything fails, just switch job/profession! 😂
I switched from soldiering to farming...most relaxing...mixed with a physical workload that would kill an average gym goer in less than a day. The only thing I miss is blowing crap up :)
 
I switched from soldiering to farming...most relaxing...mixed with a physical workload that would kill an average gym goer in less than a day. The only thing I miss is blowing crap up :)
I know some guys who once fertilized the field by blowing up a huge pile of cowdung in the middle. :LOL:
 
I've been working in software for 20 years, and even though I was quite passionate about it in the first 10/15 years, my interest has declined steeply for the past 5... Since I'm only turning 40 in a couple weeks, sometimes I dread what the future will be, since I still got another 28 years to go (at least - retirement minimum age keeps increasing). I'm not even halfway and I'm already losing my spark, I can't possibly imagine how fed up I will be in 10 or 20 years.
Totally this. It's become a young person's game for young, bright minds. I'm 48 in a month, and I've been feeling that way for about a decade. Wish I could say it gets easier. 🤷‍♀️
I am nearing 20 years of career in software (in 2021), will be 42 soon (ah the wrong answer to life, the universe and everything), and I don't share your pessimistic outlook. Just learn new and popular language, be it python or some frontend mumbo jumbo... Go is also rising fast... This is coming from a PERL programmer who switched to Python - and I still keep getting amazed by Python everyday by discovering something new, some cool module or even some clever language construct.

Of course there are hard moments in the career as well, especially when you need to switch technologies. They come from uncertainties and being pushed out from your comfort zone, but it will pass. And if not? Change job, it can be refreshing, you might learn something new from new people. When I decided I want to be a programmer, I accepted that it's the job on which you have to constantly learn till you retire. There will always be something new, framework, language, technology, hardware... Just stick to whatever makes you happy - for example I steered away from frontend for a long time, but the world goes the way of SaaS, so frontend skills (or fullstack skills to be more precise), are desired. And it's still okay to be excited by new tech ;-) I know I am.

As for losing spark, maybe you guys just need a long vacation. A month to travel around the world (ugh, not in those COVID times obviously), or doing something you like. Consider it. Everybody needs rest.
 
I've been working in software for 20 years, and even though I was quite passionate about it in the first 10/15 years, my interest has declined steeply for the past 5... Since I'm only turning 40 in a couple weeks, sometimes I dread what the future will be, since I still got another 28 years to go (at least - retirement minimum age keeps increasing). I'm not even halfway and I'm already losing my spark, I can't possibly imagine how fed up I will be in 10 or 20 years.
I found Data Processing (DP), as it was called when I started, to be a very broad profession. It spans so many disciplines including writing code that there are always new things to try out. As it seems to suffer from silver bullet syndrome there is always something new going past that you can get involved in from the very start :). I should have got on the SAP train when that one started :)

If you have anything like long service leave or equivalent take a break of at least 3 months so you can get work out of your head and routine, then you can clearly think about what you want to do and more importantly what you don't want to do anymore. Sadly you have to deal with the economics to make that decision reality.

I retired out of DP when I was 58 (started in 1983), and it was my second career as I am ex-military. My longest role was Data Base Administration which I had worked in both mid range and mainframe systems and software. My longest time at a single employer was 10 years and shortest was 6 months :).
 
I managed 23 years at the soldier bit, the government had to hire the Taliban to blow me up to get rid of me in the end.

So far...although I'm supposed to be retired and an invalid, I've managed 18 years as a farmer. The good thing about the army... and farming... is the sheer variety mixed with an outdoors workplace. You tend to be so busy during and physically tired at the end of a day it doesn't give to being a natural breeding ground for discontent...speaking for both jobs there too.
 
I can't believe someone hasn't posted this here yet...

Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_urbl-2gV4


or this:

Made me feel guilty now since I've already watched it :D

Interesting news about the final official minimum and recommended PC specs...they're absolutely rock bottom and smack of really heavy game optimisation....although I expected nothing less from CDPR. I think I'm well in the green zone for PC specs :D
 
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