Distant Worlds Survival Handbook and Supplemental Info Pamphlet

I haven't really been doing enough advertising for this but I thought I'd start now.

As linked in the Newsletter, A bunch of explorers including myself have written a survival handbook for new and old explorers alike. It's a gritty and hopefully humorous and paranoid sounding book about how to survive (with a little bit about what to do when you don't.)

There's also the Supplemental Info Pamphlet that contains a lot of important explorer related procedures and expedition ettiquette.

Together they make a neat pair of customs and ideas that make your journey both survival and enjoyable for everyone involved.

Now no links to these documents would be complete without a full creditation to everyone involved. I'm sorry that that wasn't included in the newsletter but they are included in the handbook and phamplet itself and here.

Distant Worlds Survival Handbook
Dystopia
Valen Zendaris
Alistar Hope
ModemusS “Alpine”
Brian Speakman
JBottz
Chankk Saotome
Olivia Vespera
Deep Space Pine
Whitmann
Aleks Carter
Stagetree
Theobroma

Distant Worlds Supplemental Info Pamphlet
ModemusS “Alpine”
Chankk Saotome

Well~ Have at it! Let me know what you think!
 
I have not lost an SRV in the previous expedition nor this one. So it isn't unavoidable. I have also boosted from white dwarves, I don't recommend it as you can get a better boost from materials, but NEVER might be too far.

Disappointed with the continuation of trying to remove my generation from ever existing by not using the OBAFGKM acronym instead. The addendum remedies this. YAY!

Obviously written for new people.

So many people are scared of neutron boosting. I can see why.

I did a ride-along (multicrew) with my sister-in-law so she can see how to do one. Maybe I need to record a video of it but surely there are many in existence. It really isn't all that bad. Its like algebra, a lot of people are scared of it but its not that bad.

As with most anything, don't rush it. I go for the purply part at the end and glide in at an oblique angle. Yes you get tossed about but I've never seen a 180 degree toss. Once you are charged, just be sure to get away from the thing. The boost isn't going to fade away.

Having said all that, my job involves flying simulated things all day long and I've been doing it a long time so I'm used to this sort of thing.

VVI is important, have fun.
 
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Some interesting stuff there although I don't necessarily agree with all of it.
I always carry two AFMUs. Why not? They weigh nothing, can be left powered off until needed and they can repair each other.
I also fit the biggest fuel scoop I can, now that I can afford it.
You can also have fit a smaller power plant if, like me, you don't have weapons that need power. But always get A-rated, for better heat management.
But full marks for some good, practical advice. I too never bother trying to boost from a White Dwarf.
 
Something I didn't see mentioned and that I had never considered. My friend lost his ship to this just after WP 11 a few days back.

Check oxygen reserves before commencing repair of Life Support.
Sadly the status of your O2 supply doesn't seem to be shown anywhere unless you turn off Life Support. So flick it off and back on before starting your repair to check you have enough O2 left to complete the repair.

My friend had a number of close stellar encounters after leaving Explorers Anchorage, and had repaired a number of times. With only a D rated Life Support module your oxygen doesn't last that long..... and it doesn't replenish until you synthesize it manually or dock at a station.
 
Something I didn't see mentioned and that I had never considered. My friend lost his ship to this just after WP 11 a few days back.

Check oxygen reserves before commencing repair of Life Support.
Sadly the status of your O2 supply doesn't seem to be shown anywhere unless you turn off Life Support. So flick it off and back on before starting your repair to check you have enough O2 left to complete the repair.

My friend had a number of close stellar encounters after leaving Explorers Anchorage, and had repaired a number of times. With only a D rated Life Support module your oxygen doesn't last that long..... and it doesn't replenish until you synthesize it manually or dock at a station.
hi there, this is a really good point. i'll have a look at adding it.
 
Kind of after the fact posting this here, but this is what works for me...

Learn the controls and set them up in a way that works for you.​
Pay attention to what is going on in the game, when, and why.​
Practice makes perfect.​
Play the game with intent and as a survivalist in general.​

Given the above, accident preparation with things like heatsinks (which I don't use) and AFMUs (which I've never needed to use), is secondary and mostly moot for me.

I haven't lost a ship in the game since 3301 (2015), and have never lost an SRV outside of beta testing, while often having a few drinks to unwind and relax when I play, but don't take that as a recommendation... ;)

This approach works well for exploration, but for the game progression meta in general, survival probably isn't actually all that important (much to my chagrin). Some people may even prefer to occasionally lose ships and the like on a whim or leisurely.

TL;DR: Accident avoidance is much more effective than accident perpetration, in my experience.


Cheers.
 
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