found a terraforable planet orbiting a black hole

That would have to be a teensy tiny planet for Hawking radiation to have any impact.
I suppose if the body was spinning at the outside speed of what a 1.34G planet could sustain, coupled with the 4 day orbital period, it might just be enough.

I do agree with your sentiment. It's probably gravity convexing the body, in turn releasing energy.
 
How far away is the secondary star?
I am not in the system I'm in colonia as of now and on the galaxy map it's weird, it doesn't tell me the distance from arrival points with stars only bodies, which obviously the black hole was my arrival point.

but with the k stars two bodies orbiting exactly opposite from each other it puts the stars distance from the black hole between 390LS and 424LS

not sure if that helps and not sure if this was a lucky find or pretty common I only found one earth like world on my trip and thought this was interesting .
 
I am not in the system I'm in colonia as of now and on the galaxy map it's weird, it doesn't tell me the distance from arrival points with stars only bodies, which obviously the black hole was my arrival point.

but with the k stars two bodies orbiting exactly opposite from each other it puts the stars distance from the black hole between 390LS and 424LS

not sure if that helps and not sure if this was a lucky find or pretty common I only found one earth like world on my trip and thought this was interesting .
That's less than 1AU - which is easily close enough to make the planet habitable.
 
OP, are you sure it's a black hole or just a type of body that Frontier has not yet developed the rendering for? Did you see the typical Frontier representation of a black hole or did you see nothing at all? Just curious because I'm seen planets orbiting nothing.
 
OP, are you sure it's a black hole or just a type of body that Frontier has not yet developed the rendering for? Did you see the typical Frontier representation of a black hole or did you see nothing at all? Just curious because I'm seen planets orbiting nothing.
if you zoom in, the grid in the background is missing which is what a black hole would look like in the system map. yep it's a black hole the systems name is right there check it out but that would be neat to have found a glitched star!
 
I suppose 'habitable' in terms of terraformed planets just means you won't step ourside and either asphyxiate, freeze or have your skin melted off. The criteria for 'it won't kill you' doesn't say anything about being it being pleasant.
 
That's less than 1AU - which is easily close enough to make the planet habitable.
This^
That planet is very likely to be within the Habitable Zone for that K-class star, since those type of stars have a Habitable Zone ranging from 0.1-1.3AU, depending on its size. 390ls is 0.7AU and 424ls is 0.84AU. So there is your reason the planet is terraformable despite orbiting a black hole. I'm guessing that even at the furthest distance from the K-class star in its orbit around the black hole, it'll still sit snugly within the HZ.

At that distance, the K-class star will be far more visible in the sky than the black hole if it's not accreting.

Which brings up an interesting point, if the black hole is that close to the star, should it be siphoning it? Impossible to tell without seeing the mass and radius of the black hole, I guess.
 
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This^
That planet is very likely to be within the Habitable Zone for that K-class star, since those type of stars have a Habitable Zone ranging from 0.1-1.3AU, depending on its size. 390ls is 0.7AU and 424ls is 0.84AU. So there is your reason the planet is terraformable despite orbiting a black hole. I'm guessing that even at the furthest distance from the K-class star in its orbit around the black hole, it'll still sit snugly within the HZ.

At that distance, the K-class star will be far more visible in the sky than the black hole if it's not accreting.

Which brings up an interesting point, if the black hole is that close to the star, should it be siphoning it? Impossible to tell without seeing the mass and radius of the black hole, I guess.
If there's a planet in a stable orbit 0.07AU from the black hole, I doubt it's having any effect on the star except as part of perfectly standard binary orbit.

What I'd be more interested in is what would happen to the planet when the black hole eclipses the secondary star.
Even if the orbit of the planet around the black hole isn't on the same orbital plane as the binary black hole / star pair, this would still happen on a periodic basis.

Does gravitational lensing of the black hole mean that the planet gets doused with an excess of EM radiation from the star during these eclipses?
That might mean that you could terraform this planet, but you might need to do it again after one of these events kills everything and damages the atmosphere.
 
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