found a terraforable planet orbiting a black hole

If there's a planet in a stable orbit 0.07AU from the black hole, I doubt it's having any effect on the star except as part of perfectly standard binary orbit.

What I'd be more interested in is what would happen to the planet when the black hole eclipses the secondary star.
Even if the orbit of the planet around the black hole isn't on the same orbital plane as the binary black hole / star pair, this would still happen on a periodic basis.

Does gravitational lensing of the black hole mean that the planet gets doused with an excess of EM radiation from the star during these eclipses?
That might mean that you could terraform this planet, but you might need to do it again after one of these events kills everything and damages the atmosphere.
It could be like the black hole situation in the Netflix Lost in Space series - pretty much fine for years, but a mandatory extinction event every so often - long enough for life to keep developing over and over, but to be killed off very soon afterwards
 
If there's a planet in a stable orbit 0.07AU from the black hole, I doubt it's having any effect on the star except as part of perfectly standard binary orbit.

What I'd be more interested in is what would happen to the planet when the black hole eclipses the secondary star.
Even if the orbit of the planet around the black hole isn't on the same orbital plane as the binary black hole / star pair, this would still happen on a periodic basis.

Does gravitational lensing of the black hole mean that the planet gets doused with an excess of EM radiation from the star during these eclipses?
That might mean that you could terraform this planet, but you might need to do it again after one of these events kills everything and damages the atmosphere.
The planet's orbit is highly inclined, as well as very eccentric.

In my amaturish opinion, depending upon the orbital period of the binary, where the apoapsis is relative the binary's orbital plane, and whether the planet is in some kind of orbital resonance, the alignment necessary for an eclipse may never occur. Even if it did, whether it is any threat would depend upon the focal point of the gravitational lens. If the focal point doesn't fall exactly on the planet, with such a brief orbital period, all anyone would see on the planet is a few seconds of rather bright light, sandwiched between a few minutes of less bright light. Even if the worst occured, at worst it still be a local disaster, as opposed to a global one.
 
If there's a planet in a stable orbit 0.07AU from the black hole, I doubt it's having any effect on the star except as part of perfectly standard binary orbit.

What I'd be more interested in is what would happen to the planet when the black hole eclipses the secondary star.
Even if the orbit of the planet around the black hole isn't on the same orbital plane as the binary black hole / star pair, this would still happen on a periodic basis.

Does gravitational lensing of the black hole mean that the planet gets doused with an excess of EM radiation from the star during these eclipses?
That might mean that you could terraform this planet, but you might need to do it again after one of these events kills everything and damages the atmosphere.
I'll be turning back, it's not to far for some follow up pictures. last I remember that k star just looked like a regular light in the sky. BUT there is 2 dwarf stars very far out as well. they look like gas giants because they are ringed. but maybe that adds to it ?

It could be like the black hole situation in the Netflix Lost in Space series - pretty much fine for years, but a mandatory extinction event every so often - long enough for life to keep developing over and over, but to be killed off very soon afterwards
couldn't a colony say make an underground bunker or a base behind the planet to shield them from the radiation if it's orbit is also eclipsed by the planet ? now I wanna see the k stars rotation speed around the black hole.

seems like a Cult planet or a planet you'd send undesireables too lmao
 
The planet's orbit is highly inclined, as well as very eccentric.

In my amaturish opinion, depending upon the orbital period of the binary, where the apoapsis is relative the binary's orbital plane, and whether the planet is in some kind of orbital resonance, the alignment necessary for an eclipse may never occur. Even if it did, whether it is any threat would depend upon the focal point of the gravitational lens. If the focal point doesn't fall exactly on the planet, with such a brief orbital period, all anyone would see on the planet is a few seconds of rather bright light, sandwiched between a few minutes of less bright light. Even if the worst occured, at worst it still be a local disaster, as opposed to a global one.
Regardless of the orbits, an alignment at some point seems inevitable.
I agree with you about the focal point though.

We'd need more info about the black hole and the star.
I think the only thing we can infer is that the black hole is more massive than the star (based on the BH being the primary object).
 
Regardless of the orbits, an alignment at some point seems inevitable.
I agree with you about the focal point though.

We'd need more info about the black hole and the star.
I think the only thing we can infer is that the black hole is more massive than the star (based on the BH being the primary object).
don't know if this helps I dug this one up
 
A bit of research and I found something I should have figured out myself.

A black hole acting as a gravitational lens doesn't have a focal length as such.
The amount the light is deflected depends on how far it passes from the black hole, so there is a 'focal line'.



So what we end up with are the incoming EM radiation passing the black hole out as far as the radius of the secondary star.
The blue lines passing close to the event horizon will have large deflections, and the lines further away smaller deflections.

The only question that leaves is where on that dotted line the planet is, and how much of that focused EM radiation will be deflected on to it compared to how much is being directly blocked by the BH and its event horizon.
 
A bit of research and I found something I should have figured out myself.

A black hole acting as a gravitational lens doesn't have a focal length as such.
The amount the light is deflected depends on how far it passes from the black hole, so there is a 'focal line'.



So what we end up with are the incoming EM radiation passing the black hole out as far as the radius of the secondary star.
The blue lines passing close to the event horizon will have large deflections, and the lines further away smaller deflections.

The only question that leaves is where on that dotted line the planet is, and how much of that focused EM radiation will be deflected on to it compared to how much is being directly blocked by the BH and its event horizon.
this is so interesting and the answer would require... math..

and an understanding of where the event horizon is on this specific hole. either the planet is dodging a space bullet or as was said is going through "the great conjunction" ( dark crystal reference. note there is three suns in the system lmao )
 
this is so interesting and the answer would require... math..

and an understanding of where the event horizon is on this specific hole. either the planet is dodging a space bullet or as was said is going through "the great conjunction" ( dark crystal reference. note there is three suns in the system lmao )
Thankfully you may be surprised to find that the in-game exclusion zone of a given black hole is around the same size as its Schwarzchild radius, at least it was accurate when I checked it against one or two small black holes I came across ages ago. Basically you drop in, hit the exclusion zone, target the black hole and check the distance, and you can check that against the Schwarzchild radius of a black hole that size using the internet - it should be very close.

It's these kind of tidbits of information that really impress me about the Stellar Forge. That we can explain many in-game features so accurately with real astrophysics.
 
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this is so interesting and the answer would require... math..

and an understanding of where the event horizon is on this specific hole. either the planet is dodging a space bullet or as was said is going through "the great conjunction" ( dark crystal reference. note there is three suns in the system lmao )
I've been trying to do the maths but to be honest I'm struggling a bit.

I have the Schwarzchild radius of a 2.6 solar mass BH at 4km, and estimating the radius of the K-star at about 500,000km

So I'm trying to calculate the deflection angles for 2.6 solar masses at those distances from a point mass to get the maximum deflection angle at the event horizon and the minimum deflection angle for light at the K-star radius from that point mass.

angle = 4GM/c2b where b is the distance of the passing light from the point mass

That's where I'm losing my thread with the calculations.

If you can work out the angles you'll be able to use trig to find a minimum and maximum focal length.
I'm convinced that the planet at ~1M km from the black hole is in between and would get a distinct ring effect during the eclipse resulting in a massive spike in EM radiation, which even for a short period of time would have a significant impact.

 
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“And here’s your weather. It will be cold today. Sunrise won’t happen, sunset won’t happen, and remember kids, don’t stare directly at the black hole, or it will suck out your soul.”

 
I've been trying to do the maths but to be honest I'm struggling a bit.

I have the Schwarzchild radius of a 2.6 solar mass BH at 4km, and estimating the radius of the K-star at about 500,000km

So I'm trying to calculate the deflection angles for 2.6 solar masses at those distances from a point mass to get the maximum deflection angle at the event horizon and the minimum deflection angle for light at the K-star radius from that point mass.

angle = 4GM/c2b where b is the distance of the passing light from the point mass

That's where I'm losing my thread with the calculations.

If you can work out the angles you'll be able to use trig to find a minimum and maximum focal length.
I'm convinced that the planet at ~1M km from the black hole is in between and would get a distinct ring effect during the eclipse resulting in a massive spike in EM radiation, which even for a short period of time would have a significant impact.

4km? I'd be very interested to see whether my assertion about the exclusion zone in-game was correct in this instance.

If someone is heading to this black hole, please do drop in and hit the exclusion zone, and let us know how close it says you are.
 
4km? I'd be very interested to see whether my assertion about the exclusion zone in-game was correct in this instance.

If someone is heading to this black hole, please do drop in and hit the exclusion zone, and let us know how close it says you are.
K. I'll take pics too.

Anyone interested in any other aspects of the system? I'm about 100 jumps out, on the highway, but I gotta eat...
 
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