Frontier are hiring!

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Rejected :/

Rejected at the first hurdle. I guess my lack of gaming dev background kinda killed my chances there.

Any ideas on the best approach to get an entry level game programming job? (not just frontier) - I would go for a graduate position - but I graduated from uni 12 years ago!
 
I've had a look at some of those posts but I feel that the requirements are just too high for me. I would love to work for Frontier but I'm only qualified to HND standard and most of the posts require a good degree.

I have a wealth of experience in different area's of I.T. but unfortunately I've been out of it for some time now even though I keep up-to-date with technology.

A pity really because I am beginning to become disillusioned with my present job as it does not present me with any challenges any more. Its just a job, but at least I'm in employment. I feel for the two million or so people in the U.K. who haven't got one.

Good luck to everyone who applies.
I get frustrated with these companies that insist on these infernal, expensive degrees that cannot guarantee the candidate will be a great coder and colleague. It's a shame when so many of the software houses in the world (among other greats) were started by those without the scripted requirements.

I've found a company who take an approach that I'm hoping will get me in the door - they ignore the "qualifications" and go for solid, practicality: you get to work a challenge, relevant to their needs. This is the sole arbiter of whether you get interviewed as you have to write/refactor a complete project for them.

An approach I hope will become far more the norm in years to come, given that you can learn a lot of practicality and theory without paying your dues in student debts - if you've the determination to study via MOOC's, books and practical work (open source etc).

I'm just late night sympathising here btw, I am not aiming at one of Elite's roles - just my first junior slot somewhere nearer to home.

*I confess, I sort of like taking a bit of a pop at the "Standard Form Requirements" that old fashioned hiring managers are still pumping out. My ex boss reckons I had far more books than he did when he did his CS degree - I didn't confess to not having read most of them yet!
 
I get frustrated with these companies that insist on these infernal, expensive degrees that cannot guarantee the candidate will be a great coder and colleague.
Quite rightly. I have a friend who is a self taught programmer and now manages a large team in programming-something to do with sat nav satellites I think. Many years ago-back in the days of "Apricots"- he used to recruit and set programming skill tests as part of a day long recruitment process-IE got them to write a program to do something. He found the greater majority of graduates were not fit for the purpose, whereas self taught programmers excelled-and subsequently got hired.
 
I get frustrated with these companies that insist on these infernal, expensive degrees that cannot guarantee the candidate will be a great coder and colleague. It's a shame when so many of the software houses in the world (among other greats) were started by those without the scripted requirements.
agreed ;)

well i have had the luck of never having to go through a formal qualification of any sort yet have held at a number of times what i consider my dream jobs. my career (non IT) was enabled by companies doing things slightly at odds with the corporate zeitgeist.

however, i do at times miss more structured learings that can be offered by formal education (university).
 
I get frustrated with these companies that insist on these infernal, expensive degrees that cannot guarantee the candidate will be a great coder and colleague. It's a shame when so many of the software houses in the world (among other greats) were started by those without the scripted requirements.
I have a hugely talented nephew who worked his asp off to get his 'infernal, expensive degree' so that he could get into the field of work he loves. Although he is currently working for one game company (his first job) I will be sending him an email tonight about the opportunities at Frontier. If it comes down to a decision between him and another then I hope the fact that he DID do the work for his degree tips the decision his way.
 
I work as a Laser repair engineer - whilst this does seem relevant to a job in the E.D universe, it's perhaps sadly not likely to obtain me a job in the gaming industry! (Unless you want me to work for you making nice footage of lasers destroying things?) :-D
 
Since someone else posted here, therefore bumping the topic to the top again, I just wanted to address the issue of the relevance of a college degree.

First, I definitely understand that a college degree doesn't necessarily mean a person is the most qualified in a certain field. This seems to be especially true in the realm of computer programming, where a person who is determined enough can become a pro without a formal education. And, even in business, some of the most successful business people alive had little to no formal education. But, when you run a company, especially a large company in a highly competitive industry, you only have so much in terms of resources and time to devote to each person applying for each position. Having a degree signals to the employer that you have the drive and ability to perform the job competently- it doesn't prove the existence of that drive and ability, but infers it. Hiring from a pool of people you don't know personally is always a gamble to a certain point, and that's one reason most employers would rather bet on someone with a degree (and preferably, some experience) than one without a degree. Of course, a strict adherence to this principle can be bad, since, as stated, talent doesn't always come with a degree. Employers in general could use a little discretion on their part, deviating where necessary from formal guidelines for hiring. However, hiring an unqualified person can be a pretty expensive mistake, which their bosses wouldn't be happy about at all. So, its one heck of a balancing act that doesn't always yield the best results. But, with the way things are, talented people without formal educations have only three options- get a good starting position through contacts (friends, family, friends of friends/family) and acquire experience in your preferred field, become your own boss and open a business, or apply that natural talent toward a formal education and excel so as to signal to the employer that you're as talented as you claim. A formal education can be pretty expensive, which means talented people don't always have the means to get the education to signal those talents. It's not a perfect system, but that's just how it is at this point. Hopefully, better hiring processes will emerge or maybe a formal education will one day be available to more people who can't always afford it. Until then, you got to beef up that résumé with education and experience.

And I hope no one takes my words personally. :cool: Sometimes I just like playing the devil's advocate. Take care and happy holidays! :)
 
Well I've only just finished my first semester towards my Computer Science/Information Analysis degree.

I'm a really good cook though? I can make some great steak tacos.
 
I can make tea, and ... wait for it ... COFFEE!
I can also bake, coconut macaroons being the current favourite in the Home for Retired and Slightly Nervous Sidewinder Pilots.

On the oft discussed topic of degrees/experience etc. I once couldn't apply for an Admin job as I didn't have a degree. It seems the employer in question perhaps didn't think a person could file alphabetically unless they had written a dissertation on their ABCs.

*Sulks, and eats a macaroon*
 
I miss one work in Frontier jobs list: in-game journalist.

Come on, let's jump the hurdle!!!

Other games have made good tries, but Elite Dangerous deserves to be the first one having a real in-game Journal/TV channel/Radio pod cast. It's easy for you, Frontier: just hire a small amount of freelancer journalist, they will cover news all over the galaxy and provide the material needed to offer your players with a real Journal/TV news channel/Radio podcast.

The infrastructure it's not so difficult to manage and deploy.

Come on, do it (...yes, you can). If you need help, call me back.
 
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Food?

I am a good chef and could cook delcious meals ^^ other than that I am very creative
for name creation and ideas for game stuff :p

I live in Norway sadly tho hehehe
 
I'll happily come and work for you, my specialty is hiding nerfbats and distracting any staff browsing the forums when they click on whine threads :p
 
I am currently looking for work, it seems your Customer Services needs help in dealing with the large amount of support tickets and would be happy to help.
 
Would love to work there, educated game designer from the University in Skövde, Sweden. But I don't see me as a great designer but i do understand the design process. I'm more of a manager and there was no such positions ;(
 
help me

today I cant seem to find escape vector I have lost ship and cargo twice because of this ...as far as I can tell it has gone, this is since yesterdays update
. also I cant seem to create a thread on this site only reply to others ...
 
today I cant seem to find escape vector I have lost ship and cargo twice because of this ...as far as I can tell it has gone, this is since yesterdays update
. also I cant seem to create a thread on this site only reply to others ...
just support ticket your prob then. they'll be able to get back to you alot faster
 
I would apply but couldnt move to Cambridge, I can see from the site that they dont allow 'working from home' so havent applied.

I can program in C/C++/x86 assembler/BASIC/Unity(C#) and I can learn anything else relatively quickly :), if ya want to contact me drop me a email and I will get back to ya.
 
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