Golkonda - why you chose Federation instead Empire?

What does rotation have to do with gravity?
Did you read the other posts of the thread...

Gravity effect is created on the current stations in the game by rotation of the station to simulate near earth gravity...
Out posts don't spin so theres no gravity simulation...
The faster the object spins in space and the more distance from center of the center of the spin the more change in the simulation of gravity the human body experiences...
If your at the end of the spinning object arm in the vacuum of space you expeience an effect like gravity because its moving in a circle in space but the spin effect tries to force you through the floor of the room...
So on space stations this is duplicate to the max by spinning the hole station or just a ring spins creating areas were the body is being forced to the floor by the effect allowing walking as normal...
 
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What does rotation have to do with gravity?
Examples of how spin can substitute for gravity.
The fairground ride where you get inside a large cylindrical cage and stand with your back to the wall when they spin it you get stuck to the wall and they can remove the floor or change the orientation of the cage and you stay stuck to the wall.
The old Wall of Death motor cycle stunt google Guy Martins Wall of Death to see how that works.
Parts of the interior of the space ship Discovery in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Home demonstration fill a bucket with water tie a rope round the handle find somewhere with lots of space and no breakable things or people and start to swing the bucket around by the rope get the spin right and the water will stay in the bucket.

All experiments carried out at the performers own risk.
 
a demonstration of someone on one of those rides. The phone recording this is not held at an angle, the guy being filmed is able to stand (and walk) on the walls because the ride is spinning so fast.

 
Examples of how spin can substitute for gravity.
The fairground ride where you get inside a large cylindrical cage and stand with your back to the wall when they spin it you get stuck to the wall and they can remove the floor or change the orientation of the cage and you stay stuck to the wall.
The old Wall of Death motor cycle stunt google Guy Martins Wall of Death to see how that works.
Parts of the interior of the space ship Discovery in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Home demonstration fill a bucket with water tie a rope round the handle find somewhere with lots of space and no breakable things or people and start to swing the bucket around by the rope get the spin right and the water will stay in the bucket.

All experiments carried out at the performers own risk.
Of course but on a planet that means you have to be inside the planet and head pointing towards the center. And that also means the soil is flying off into space.
 
Did you read the other posts of the thread...

Gravity effect is created on the current stations in the game by rotation of the station to simulate near earth gravity...
Out posts don't spin so theres no gravity simulation...
The faster the object spins in space and the more distance from center of the center of the spin the more change in the simulation of gravity the human body experiences...
If your at the end of the spinning object arm in the vacuum of space you expeience an effect like gravity because its moving in a circle in space but the spin effect tries to force you through the floor of the room...
So on space stations this is duplicate to the max by spinning the hole station or just a ring spins creating areas were the body is being forced to the floor by the effect allowing walking as normal...
Obviously, but that doesn’t work on the surface. Only head towards center of planet (upside down) and inside.
 
Of course but on a planet that means you have to be inside the planet and head pointing towards the center. And that also means the soil is flying off into space.
The earth takes 24 hours to rotate - or 0.000694 rpm. On an 80 kilogram mass (such as a human), this exerts an effective centrefugal force of 2.7 newtons, or an acceleration of 0.03369m/s/s. Considering that gravitational acceleration on earth is 9.8m/s/s, the earth's rotation is insufficient to overcome gravity and throw us all into space.

A space station is considerably less massive than a planet and rotates considerably faster.
 
The earth takes 24 hours to rotate - or 0.000694 rpm. On an 80 kilogram mass (such as a human), this exerts an effective centrefugal force of 2.7 newtons, or an acceleration of 0.03369m/s/s. Considering that gravitational acceleration on earth is 9.8m/s/s, the earth's rotation is insufficient to overcome gravity and throw us all into space.

A space station is considerably less massive than a planet and rotates considerably faster.
The point was that you can’t increase gravity by spinning the planet - only decrease - since the centrifugal force is in the opposite direction of gravity. Unless you spin it so fast that you overcome the normal gravity and generate enough through centrifugal force that it results in higher - but opposite direction. But at that point the soil is flying off as well and your head is pointing inwards and your feet to the surface. Like Ceres station in The Expanse.
 
The point was that you can’t increase gravity by spinning the planet - only decrease - since the centrifugal force is in the opposite direction of gravity. Unless you spin it so fast that you overcome the normal gravity and generate enough through centrifugal force that it results in higher - but opposite direction. But at that point the soil is flying off as well and your head is pointing inwards and your feet to the surface. Like Ceres station in The Expanse.
Who the hell was talking about spinning a planet faster? Re-read.
 
The point was that you can’t increase gravity by spinning the planet - only decrease - since the centrifugal force is in the opposite direction of gravity. Unless you spin it so fast that you overcome the normal gravity and generate enough through centrifugal force that it results in higher - but opposite direction. But at that point the soil is flying off as well and your head is pointing inwards and your feet to the surface. Like Ceres station in The Expanse.
If you spin the planet faster the equator bulges out more so the poles contract so the shape becomes more like a discus than a sphere and although the gravity at the equator will be reduced (further from the centre) at the poles the gravity will be stronger. Read "Mission of Gravity" for more details.
 
The point was that you can’t increase gravity by spinning the planet - only decrease - since the centrifugal force is in the opposite direction of gravity. Unless you spin it so fast that you overcome the normal gravity and generate enough through centrifugal force that it results in higher - but opposite direction. But at that point the soil is flying off as well and your head is pointing inwards and your feet to the surface. Like Ceres station in The Expanse.
You could always spin it slower - tidally lock it to the star! You market it as "eternal sunshine" and will naturally attract shady types on the dark side!

This actually have several technological benefits for planet dwellers (solar farms on sunny side, telescopes on dark side). Just don't let the environmentalists hear your plans...
 
If you spin the planet faster the equator bulges out more so the poles contract so the shape becomes more like a discus than a sphere and although the gravity at the equator will be reduced (further from the centre) at the poles the gravity will be stronger. Read "Mission of Gravity" for more details.
This is only true for small effects. If you take this to the extreme and live on a flat planet disk, if you are in the centre of the spinning object, you only have a small amount of ground below you; the ground on your sides are far away and act mainly alongside the face of the disk but in opposite directions.
 
My CMDR was indifferent to the outcome of this event and did not participate, but I imagine many players/CMDRs were swayed by the Federation rank locked ships having generally greater appeal than Imperial ones.
 
I gave token support for the Empire, but was largely indifferent about this. An orbital home is probably closer to their comfort zone, but giving them a planetbound one would have been a bit of tough love they need. The landing pad question is mostly a moot one. You really don't need a large pad ship to trade some rares.
 
Generally, I support the empire over the feds but this time I supported the feds because:
1. It's quicker to land at an outpost than a planet. Although not having a large pad is a negative.
2. I wanted to get a discount on a Corvette.
 
Have any of you visited their new outpost? The Feds built it 30 km from the Golconda. They also built them a large agriculture station adjacent to the outpost with spin gravity arboretums. Saw several of the Golcondans flying around in Asp Explorers. Sure beats what the slave traders would have gave them.
 
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