I always fit D-Rated sensors, is there a reason not to?

I don't do much of the PVP and therefore deal with NPCs most of the time. NPCs not too smart nor too stealthy so I use "D" sensors and "D" life support on all my ships for better speed and jump range. I was trying different combinations couple of times but even with better range "A" sensors didn't affected my everyday life that much and I went back for cheaper and lighter "D" stuff. With that said I think it would be matter of personal preferences and game style. Somebody who's seating out in the cold, dark pirate ship and waiting for that freighter to show up wold probably appreciate every extra meter of the sensors range.
 
D-rated sensors are pretty useless for CZs and RES bounty farming, where A-rated with long-range engineering is much more useful. They're also good for doing PvP with a small fast ship, where you can watch the gankers from long range, then charge in, strike and get out again before they can shoot back.
 
I'd really like to see a bit more utility to high grade sensors - especially in an explorer build it feels wrong to take low grade sensors out, should exploring be (partly) about using the best sensor for data gathering? As it is D grade makes sense, low weight, realitively low power and no loss in scan angle from engineering.

I quite like the idea of scanner bays, we keep getting new scanner types, perhaps have these fitted in bays associated with your sensors - number fittable (and possibly buffs/debuffs) associated with sensor module grade..

As was mentioned elsewhere here (and I've commented on myself previously) when the sensors on a large ship have greater mass than several sidewinders it is getting a bit daft - that mass cost ought to mean something. More bays, better buffs perhaps?
 
I guess it's game design to suit the WW1 flight model, but really sensors weighing more tons than they have kilometres range is ridiculous even by present-day radar and optical standards. No-one would buy such junk in reality.
I think what is often missed by the “Why are my sensor so heavy” crowd, is that these aren’t just a little plug-in modular antenna. These are entire systems.

Let’s put it this way: if you collected all the network equipment in your residence, you’ve got what, a modem, a router, maybe a switch, and possibly an access point or two. That weighs what? 4 pounds?

Compare that to the networking equipment for a mid-sized business. Dozens of routers, switches, access points, firewalls... in the end you’ve got a few hundred pounds of equipment.

So it does make sense that the sensor arrays of a building-sized ship would weigh as much as your little sidewinder.

Ok, maybe not quite that much, but I hope you get the point.
 
I think what is often missed by the “Why are my sensor so heavy” crowd, is that these aren’t just a little plug-in modular antenna. These are entire systems.

Let’s put it this way: if you collected all the network equipment in your residence, you’ve got what, a modem, a router, maybe a switch, and possibly an access point or two. That weighs what? 4 pounds?

Compare that to the networking equipment for a mid-sized business. Dozens of routers, switches, access points, firewalls... in the end you’ve got a few hundred pounds of equipment.

So it does make sense that the sensor arrays of a building-sized ship would weigh as much as your little sidewinder.

Ok, maybe not quite that much, but I hope you get the point.
I see your point but I don't think the numbers stack up. I have background in radar: limited to single-figure tons with requirements for hundreds of kilometres range on shipborne systems. That's in a cluttered sea environment; things should be a lot easier in space.

<Edit> I use your reasoning to explain that engineer with the cigar addiction though. I told myself that each "ton" of Kamitra cigars was actually 6 cigars plus a ton of cryogenic gear for keeping them in perfect condition.
 
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I see your point but I don't think the numbers stack up. I have background in radar: limited to single-figure tons with requirements for hundreds of kilometres range on shipborne systems. That's in a cluttered sea environment; things should be a lot easier in space.
They are two different aspects though. One aspect is that Frontier wants WW1 in space, like you said. They probably also don't even spawn NPCs outside of something like 20km. It probably wouldn't even be fun if you could see hundreds of NPCs on your scanner. That's a design and engine limitation decision.

The other aspect is that the sensors weight a lot on bigger ships without offering an advantage. That's also a design decision.

But they aren't connected, they are two different aspects of sensors.

Once you accept that sensor range is limited for design reasons it really doesn't matter how much they weight anymore, regardless if it's realistic because the whole sensor nonsense isn't realistic to begin with.
Now if you want a lore reason, Indigo's explanation isn't bad.
 
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I think what is often missed by the “Why are my sensor so heavy” crowd, is that these aren’t just a little plug-in modular antenna. These are entire systems.

Let’s put it this way: if you collected all the network equipment in your residence, you’ve got what, a modem, a router, maybe a switch, and possibly an access point or two. That weighs what? 4 pounds?

Compare that to the networking equipment for a mid-sized business. Dozens of routers, switches, access points, firewalls... in the end you’ve got a few hundred pounds of equipment.

So it does make sense that the sensor arrays of a building-sized ship would weigh as much as your little sidewinder.

Ok, maybe not quite that much, but I hope you get the point.
I'm not seeing how that logic makes sense. A mid sized business isn't running that equipment just because of it's size. It's running it because it needs it for the sake of connecting and operating client machines and/or server infrastructure. So now we have an issue with the analogy: What are the additional client devices or networks that my Corvette's Edge router+Firewall is running that my Sidewinder's old Comcast Modem isn't? For the life of me I can't see to find those extra devices or figure out what they do.
 
ED's sensor system is bad. Every single terrestrial fighter simulator I've played has FAR better capability. Modes that trade distance for scan width and update rate and modes for sorting ground from air contacts. Navigation systems that can set and monitor waypoints, analyze fuel use and predict endurance based on current consumption.

Here we have 4th millennium FTL ships that can't
  • Target something that my freaking eyeballs can see in space. Seriously???? SERIOUSLY????
  • Target anything on the ground other than pre-designated ports and mission POI. No RADAR to search for sites of interest just giant blue circles of confusion.
  • Mark any surface waypoints or plot a route via waypoints. Not in space, not on the ground.
  • Thermal detection that's thwarted by heatsinks on ships with rocket nozzles out the back. Keep in mind that even a few watts against space is bright but somehow ships propelling themselves foreward without venting electronics waste heat are near invisible beyond 1000M
I know it's done to force us into pew-pew range, but the whole "I can see the ship before my stupid multi 100K 'sensor' can" is complete garbage to me. One of the things about it I like the least.
 
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I'm not seeing how that logic makes sense. A mid sized business isn't running that equipment just because of it's size. It's running it because it needs it for the sake of connecting and operating client machines and/or server infrastructure. So now we have an issue with the analogy: What are the additional client devices or networks that my Corvette's Edge router+Firewall is running that my Sidewinder's old Comcast Modem isn't? For the life of me I can't see to find those extra devices or figure out what they do.
A few thousand sensor nodes so you can detect and track enemy ships in your Corvette’s big blind spot.
 
LongRange Sensors offer a few advantages, but not everyone needs them.

  • being able to track Targets upto 14.1km away is super useful in RES sites or in Conflict Zones (i.e. able to target the SLF onto distant Engagements)
  • being able to still track Targets that popped a Heat Sink (as opposed to losing them for upto ~15sec) can be very useful as well
  • being able to detect cold Targets that'd otherwise be able to sneak into very close range can be very helpful
If those advantages are deemed worthy to pick A-Grade Sensors or install heavyweight LongRange mods is personal preference.

PS.
I've done fairly extensive tests and it seems NPCs cheat with their Sensor Detection too.
Instead of using their own Sensors, it seems the targeting scripts use the Player Sensors to trigger an NPC.

Just a few days ago, I had one of those bugged "One or more System Authority Vessels spontaneously go Hostile for no reason" moments.
Turns out, an Authority Viper IV is able to positively track a 0% Heat Player Ship even when using Silent Rrunning over.... 14+km (!) lol - that was my own max. Sensor Range on it.
 
I've done fairly extensive tests and it seems NPCs cheat with their Sensor Detection too.
Instead of using their own Sensors, it seems the targeting scripts use the Player Sensors to trigger an NPC.

Just a few days ago, I had one of those bugged "One or more System Authority Vessels spontaneously go Hostile for no reason" moments.
Turns out, an Authority Viper IV is able to positively track a 0% Heat Player Ship even when using Silent Rrunning over.... 14+km (!) lol - that was my own max. Sensor Range on it.
So ANOTHER reason to use E-rated sensors on my stealth smuggling ship! :D
 
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