I always fit D-Rated sensors, is there a reason not to?

(Entitled rich kid voice) My father is a lawyer, i can afford A-rated unlike the rest of you peasent (snobby laugh)
 
Fighter radar packages from the 1980s would be an upgrade. Contemporary fighters have radar ranges in the 100s of km and are not restricted to heat detection.
True that... even my good old AGP-65GY would have easily put any LongRange Engineered 8A Sensor Package of 3305a.d. to shame.
(oh, and that AGP-65 was a hell less heavy than an 8A Sensor hehe, that's far more than my old maximum permitted TakeOff Gross Weight was all by itself)
 
Fighter radar packages from the 1980s would be an upgrade. Contemporary fighters have radar ranges in the 100s of km and are not restricted to heat detection.
Yeah i know,. I do understand this is a game & some things seem illogical, Also get Indigo point that bigger ships would need more coverage from radar/sensors nodes placed around the ship to detect targets. The weight is clearly for balancing, but it doesn't make sense, and the benefits are marginal for the weight. For the cost of such A8 sensors it would be cheaper to have kitted out cobras surrounding you with A4 sensors. Personally i'd rather they'd atleast expand the benefits of sensors to other areas like less jitter during chaffs, if weight is a sign of quality.
 
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Strange, the sidewinder seems to have the same directional coverage yet does so at a couple of orders of magnitude less mass.
Ok, time to get out my crayons I suppose...


Sidewinder: Class 1 Sensor, Mass 1.3 - 2.0 tons.



Anaconda: Class 8 Sensor, Mass: 64-256 tons.

Now with our heads in the full, upright and extracted position, let's postulate a little here. Our little tiny sidewinder, at 21.4 x 14.9 m needs two sensor nodes, one in the front, one in the back, and has 360 degree coverage, out to their range of 4km. Our much larger Anaconda, at 61.8 x 152.4 m needs many more sensor nodes, let's say 2 in the front, 2 in the back and 6 down each side to give that same 360 degree coverage out to their range of 5.12 km.

Some basic math:

Where x = the mass of the sensor node

2x < 16x

Thus the 8E sensor suite of the Anaconda is heavier than the 1E sensor suite of the Sidewinder.

Falling back to my earlier example of WiFi equipment for a home versus that of a business...



This is a heat map. It shows the coverage and strength of coverage for this floor of an office building. As you can see, there is no coverage on the east side of this building, because someone didn't bother to think about the coverage area of each access point. For this office, simply moving some of these access points around would provide good coverage for the entire office. A single access point might not provide very good coverage though, but might be just fine for your home.

Thus, covering more area requires more equipment, more equipment has more mass.

This isn't rocket science.



This is rocket science.
 
I use A rated in nearly everything. I don't enjoy chasing potential targets around. The longer the range, the easier it is to hunt in a HazRes, CompNavs, AnarchyNav, etc...
 
For small/medium ships, A-rated sensor are a choice.

For large ships, A-rated sensors are used for "BALANCE" by artificially inflating their mass to ridiculous levels. If you could strap a an A-sensor Sidewinder to a Corvette, you would have better sensor performance and less mass than fitting an A-sensor module to the Corvette.

So D-sensors with lightweight mod is the way to go if you're looking to avoid a mass hit on a large ship. The sensor range will suffer.

On a side note, why is the sensor range so limited in the first place? Other sensors work in SC or for planetary analysis at vast distances. But in normal space, you're limited to klicks, which makes no sense whatsoever. Poor game design, that's my opinion.
Yeh, the weight of the larger sensors is ridiculous and should be fixed.
 
Neither is understanding that wifi signals and thermal imaging aren't comparable, or that ED Sensors make no sense, but hey, you do you.
Once again, science is proven correct - the densest mineral in the universe is cranium.

Our sensor suites are more than just Thermal Imaging. Doubt it? Turn your sensors off and try to request docking.

What is the temperature of a cargo container full of gold, floating in the vacuum of space?

Whatever room you're in, it's room temperature in there.
 
Yeh, the weight of the larger sensors is ridiculous and should be fixed.
Grade and Class are not the same thing. Yes, different classes do have different masses, within their grades.

Hence the Sidewinder above, has a mass range of 1.3 - 2.0 tons. Of total sensor equipment, in a Class 1 module. Why is the D-grade so much lighter? It's made of wax paper and plastic. The A-grade, much heavier, is made of aluminum, steel and ceramic.

The Anaconda is a class 8. That's huge. Massively huge.
In Cargo terms, a Class 8 Cargo module holds 256 tons of material. A Class 1 holds 2 tons of material.

This is a class 1, E-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about a pound.



This is a Class 8, A-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about 190 pounds.



Inconceivable, isn't it?
 
Our sensor suites are more than just Thermal Imaging. Doubt it? Turn your sensors off and try to request docking.
Turning your sensors off indeed shuts off comms . . . except for your message inbox, and other ships sending you direct comms. I take it Stations have special communications that must be "sensed" to be received? Seems daft for traffic controllers to have worse comms than every ship in the galaxy.

What is the temperature of a cargo container full of gold, floating in the vacuum of space?
Apparently warmer than the silent running ship evading your sensors by retaining it's heat, which you can clearly see with the naked eye, but the very same sensors can't see.

More ways that sensors in ED make no sense.

Just so ya know, I'm not poking fun at you, just at the notion that sensors in ED make a shred of sense.
 
Hey all,
So, as per the title, I always fit D-Rated sensors and I'll often lighten them too. My understanding is that better sensors simply extend the detection range slightly, no other features. There was talk - and I think it made it into a Beta once - about better sensor improving Gimballed and Turreted weapons locks so they'd resist things like Chaff better and be able to detect cold ships more readily. However, I think that never made it out of beta. Basically, as I've been away from the game for a while only returning fairly recently, is there any plus to having A-Rated Sensors? Is the drop in Speed and Jump Range worth it? Personally, I'd love it if A-Rated stuff allowed for better targetting as per that old Beta, but I suspect D-Rated is still the way to go.
Just something I was wondering about is all.
Cheers, Scoob.
For my two cents, a place where A-rated sensors can give the CMDR a life-saving edge is in combat, where an extra one-second difference in detection time might save a CMDR's ship. My "dedicated, combat" ships sport A-rated sensors. Victory has its many costs and IMO combat is a place where the absolutely best toys can give a CMDR that minuscule edge and hopefully skill (or luck) takes him or her the rest of the way. o7
 
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Ok, time to get out my crayons I suppose...


Sidewinder: Class 1 Sensor, Mass 1.3 - 2.0 tons.



Anaconda: Class 8 Sensor, Mass: 64-256 tons.

Now with our heads in the full, upright and extracted position, let's postulate a little here. Our little tiny sidewinder, at 21.4 x 14.9 m needs two sensor nodes, one in the front, one in the back, and has 360 degree coverage, out to their range of 4km. Our much larger Anaconda, at 61.8 x 152.4 m needs many more sensor nodes, let's say 2 in the front, 2 in the back and 6 down each side to give that same 360 degree coverage out to their range of 5.12 km.

Some basic math:

Where x = the mass of the sensor node

2x < 16x

Thus the 8E sensor suite of the Anaconda is heavier than the 1E sensor suite of the Sidewinder.

Falling back to my earlier example of WiFi equipment for a home versus that of a business...



This is a heat map. It shows the coverage and strength of coverage for this floor of an office building. As you can see, there is no coverage on the east side of this building, because someone didn't bother to think about the coverage area of each access point. For this office, simply moving some of these access points around would provide good coverage for the entire office. A single access point might not provide very good coverage though, but might be just fine for your home.

Thus, covering more area requires more equipment, more equipment has more mass.

This isn't rocket science.



This is rocket science.
And yet larger warships manage with a slightly larger radar array ... not a 128x larger one ...
Ok, time to get out my crayons I suppose...


Sidewinder: Class 1 Sensor, Mass 1.3 - 2.0 tons.



Anaconda: Class 8 Sensor, Mass: 64-256 tons.

Now with our heads in the full, upright and extracted position, let's postulate a little here. Our little tiny sidewinder, at 21.4 x 14.9 m needs two sensor nodes, one in the front, one in the back, and has 360 degree coverage, out to their range of 4km. Our much larger Anaconda, at 61.8 x 152.4 m needs many more sensor nodes, let's say 2 in the front, 2 in the back and 6 down each side to give that same 360 degree coverage out to their range of 5.12 km.

Some basic math:

Where x = the mass of the sensor node

2x < 16x

Thus the 8E sensor suite of the Anaconda is heavier than the 1E sensor suite of the Sidewinder.

Falling back to my earlier example of WiFi equipment for a home versus that of a business...



This is a heat map. It shows the coverage and strength of coverage for this floor of an office building. As you can see, there is no coverage on the east side of this building, because someone didn't bother to think about the coverage area of each access point. For this office, simply moving some of these access points around would provide good coverage for the entire office. A single access point might not provide very good coverage though, but might be just fine for your home.

Thus, covering more area requires more equipment, more equipment has more mass.

This isn't rocket science.



This is rocket science.
Yes ... 2x is eight times less than 16x. But not 128x less or whatever ridiculous multiplier FD is using.
 
Ok, time to get out my crayons I suppose...


Sidewinder: Class 1 Sensor, Mass 1.3 - 2.0 tons.



Anaconda: Class 8 Sensor, Mass: 64-256 tons.

Now with our heads in the full, upright and extracted position, let's postulate a little here. Our little tiny sidewinder, at 21.4 x 14.9 m needs two sensor nodes, one in the front, one in the back, and has 360 degree coverage, out to their range of 4km. Our much larger Anaconda, at 61.8 x 152.4 m needs many more sensor nodes, let's say 2 in the front, 2 in the back and 6 down each side to give that same 360 degree coverage out to their range of 5.12 km.

Some basic math:

Where x = the mass of the sensor node

2x < 16x

Thus the 8E sensor suite of the Anaconda is heavier than the 1E sensor suite of the Sidewinder.

Falling back to my earlier example of WiFi equipment for a home versus that of a business...



This is a heat map. It shows the coverage and strength of coverage for this floor of an office building. As you can see, there is no coverage on the east side of this building, because someone didn't bother to think about the coverage area of each access point. For this office, simply moving some of these access points around would provide good coverage for the entire office. A single access point might not provide very good coverage though, but might be just fine for your home.

Thus, covering more area requires more equipment, more equipment has more mass.

This isn't rocket science.



This is rocket science.
The longest axis on the Conda is 152.4m. E class sensors run to 5.12Km. The worst possible directional coverage from a single point is 4.9676Km. Add a sensor to the opposite end along the center line and the worst coverage is raised to 5.0881Km. That's with 2 points. Conda's aren't that big compared to sensor range even if they dwarf a sidewinder. Even if we assume sensors scale with horrendous efficiency and the mass doubles for each one to get the extra range a class 8 gives if you're bridging the gap from 2.6 to 160T because of a worst case loss of 152.4m you should probably stop trying to be a rocket scientist.
 
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Grade and Class are not the same thing. Yes, different classes do have different masses, within their grades.

Hence the Sidewinder above, has a mass range of 1.3 - 2.0 tons. Of total sensor equipment, in a Class 1 module. Why is the D-grade so much lighter? It's made of wax paper and plastic. The A-grade, much heavier, is made of aluminum, steel and ceramic.

The Anaconda is a class 8. That's huge. Massively huge.
In Cargo terms, a Class 8 Cargo module holds 256 tons of material. A Class 1 holds 2 tons of material.

This is a class 1, E-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about a pound.



This is a Class 8, A-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about 190 pounds.



Inconceivable, isn't it?
Yes, it is inconcaivable, because if a class 8 and 1 are that different the capabilities should be wildly different as opposed to mildly different.
 
Grade and Class are not the same thing. Yes, different classes do have different masses, within their grades.

Hence the Sidewinder above, has a mass range of 1.3 - 2.0 tons. Of total sensor equipment, in a Class 1 module. Why is the D-grade so much lighter? It's made of wax paper and plastic. The A-grade, much heavier, is made of aluminum, steel and ceramic.

The Anaconda is a class 8. That's huge. Massively huge.
In Cargo terms, a Class 8 Cargo module holds 256 tons of material. A Class 1 holds 2 tons of material.

This is a class 1, E-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about a pound.



This is a Class 8, A-Grade satellite dish. It weighs about 190 pounds.



Inconceivable, isn't it?
140220

Class AAAAA 500m Aperture Spherical Telescope (in China). It weighs a lot

The same could go for rocket engines. Even the Saturn V had a classification against your whimpy A class model rocket engine
 
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The longest axis on the Conda is 152.4m. E class sensors run to 5.12Km. The worst possible directional coverage from a single point is 4.9676Km. Add a sensor to the opposite end along the center line and the worst coverage is raised to 5.0881Km. That's with 2 points. Conda's aren't that big compared to sensor range even if they dwarf a sidewinder. Even if we assume sensors scale with horrendous efficiency and the mass doubles for each one to get the extra range a class 8 gives if you're bridging the gap from 2.6 to 160T because of a worst case loss of 152.4m you should probably stop trying to be a rocket scientist.
At least the basic concept is being grasped at last. And I never claimed my explanation made perfect sense, just sense. I don't disagree either that some of these massive class sensor arrays are grossly over-massed - they certainly are. And while yes, it is entirely possible to build something that is much bigger, without it actually being any better, that also falls into the realm of "why bother?".

However, it also seems very likely to me that Frontier has plenty of other things to worry about than something that really is this minor at this point in time. It's not like Elite is a complete, final game. It still has several years worth of growth left before we really need to obsess over minutiae.
 
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Class AAAAA 500m Aperture Spherical Telescope (in China). It weighs a lot

The same could go for rocket engines. Even the Saturn V had a classification against your whimpy A class model rocket engine
Class 10, Grade A.

Of course, I'll top all of them when NASA finally approves my Whole Earth Tethered Frequency Amplified Radio Telescope project.... if they'd just quit complaining about the acronym.
 
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At least the basic concept is being grasped at last. And I never claimed my explanation made perfect sense, just sense. I don't disagree either that some of these massive class sensor arrays are grossly over-massed - they certainly are. And while yes, it is entirely possible to build something that is much bigger, without it actually being any better, that also falls into the realm of "why bother?".

However, it also seems very likely to me that Frontier has plenty of other things to worry about than something that really is this minor at this point in time. It's not like Elite is a complete, final game. It still has several years worth of growth left before we really need to obsess over minutiae.
The concept was grasped from the beginning, it just seemed nonsensical since the first post for the very reason spelled out with numbers later. As for why bother, they won't because it's likely for balancing mass as much as anything and it's not like the conda needs help with jump range.

That said, it's still silly the games played with concepts like mass and other attributes sometimes that make the game overall not make all that much sense, like sensor mechanics as a whole. And with this I'm not sure how fixing it would actually be difficult. Other modules have different masses at a given class so it's not like their all irreversibly connected. The viper got it's mass changed without a massive overhaul. Not sure why this would be different.
 
I mean a Diesel engine built for a semi truck wouldn't be able to fit inside a Mini Cooper. The Engine for the Mini wouldn't produce enough Energy:Torque to move the semi. Even if you could fit the diesel engine into the mini it would be too heavy. Even with ALL the necessary modifications, it's not practical

There was a guide that explained in laymans terms the quality you're getting per letter grading. If we're specifically talking about sensors and radar, think about it like this: you could mount an underwing LITENING pod underneath a 737, but unless you're looking to drop laser guided bombs from United Airlines flights, theres no point; even if you over look the fact they don't sell LITENING Pods to commercial airlines. If not a Litening pod, maybe the radar dish on the E-3 Sentry. It's big, it draws power and consumes fuel like an mmmmmhm

For a combat ship in ED, a larger ship would benefit from a more powerful radar with better heat management than a "lighter" radar. Don't get me wrong, you could turn any ship in ED into a combat ship if you try hard enough. But the options are there in order for players to play their way or play differently if they're that bored..
 
Blimey!

Some people going to great lengths to justify their opinion about the viability of sensors in the ED universe.

Hate to say it but... it's a game.

Sure, the weights are probably a bit silly but, meh.
If you're finding that the weight of your sensors is causing practical issues for your ship, fit D-rated sensors and light-weight 'em.
Otherwise, don't worry about it.

With G5 light-weight 8D sensors (12.8t), my Corvette has a jump-range of 31Ly and top speed of 296m/s.
With G5 long-range 8A sensors (320t), my Corvette has a jump-range of 28Ly and a top speed of 288m/s

So, adding 300t of weight knocks a couple of Ly off the range and 8m/s off the speed - in return for tripling the sensor's range.

It's certainly worth thinking about which sensors you fit but it's not really worth getting bent out of shape over their weight... silly as those weights are. ;)
 
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