More large ground birds

At the moment, the only announced birds in Planet Zoo are the common ostrich and Indian peafowl - I have seen mention elsewhere of two other species (namely an unidentified flamingo and the Southern cassowary - not sure on the validity of the latter).

There are lots of additional birds that could be included without needing to add aviaries, which I really doubt will come with the base game. I have included below a list of birds that are mostly or entirely terrestrial; they have also all been kept in captivity to some extent.

Ratites
  • Cassowaries (any of the three species would do, although the Southern is the only truly common species in captivity)
  • Emu
  • Rheas (either of the to species would be suitable)
  • Grey tinamou (a large and rare species of tinamou - its sad that eggs aren't included in-game, as this species lays ridiculously vivid blue eggs)

Waterfowl
  • Swans (this could be any of the six true swans or the South American coscoroba swan)
  • Geese (this could include goose-like species such as the Egyptian, spur-winged, Orinoco and magpie geese as well as the true goose species)
  • Magellanic steamerduck (not hugely abundant in captivity but is one of the largest ducks on earth)
  • Screamers (any of the three species are kept, but the Southern screamer is the most familiar and commonly-kept)

Landfowl
  • Green peafowl (this species occupies a more open, savanna-like habitat than the current Indian peafowl and is also a more endangered species)
  • Ocellated turkey (I think possibly the bird I want most in the game - unbelievably colourful and shares its native range with the Baird's tapir)
  • Himalayan monal (a cold-weather bird that shares its range with the snow leopard; could possibly be replaced with the Chinese monal)
  • Satyr tragopan
  • Curassow (there are fifteen species to choose from, including two critically endangered and one extinct in the wild species)
  • Horned guan
  • Mound-builders (this group of birds includes the Australian brush-turkey and malleefowl, both from Australia, and the Indonesian maleo)

Other waterbirds
  • Penguins (perhaps the most charismatic birds around - there are a number of species that would work well in the game)
  • Flamingos (it seems possible these are in the game, so its a matter of wondering which species it is - personally, I'm hoping for the Chilean flamingo)
  • Pelicans (any of the eight species would work - they naturally occur on every continent except Antarctica)
  • Great cormorant (would work well with the East Asian theme, considering the use of cormorants in traditional fishing there)
  • Cranes (any species would be suitable - all are kept in captivity although perhaps most familiar are the African crowned cranes)
  • Storks (again, almost any species would do - they naturally occupy every continent except Antarctica)
  • Herons (large species such as the African goliath heron have been kept in open mixed exhibits with large herbivores)
  • Shoebill (another charismatic waterbird, albeit one that is very scarce in zoos)

Predatory birds
  • Secretary bird (a charismatic bird of the African savannah and has been mixed with other species including large ungulates)
  • Red-legged seriema (as above, except from South America)

Other ground birds
  • Takahe (only kept in New Zealand, but one of the more colourful and charismatic flightless birds of that country)
  • Giant coot (not kept in zoos currenly, although it was in the past - this South American bird is the only one that becomes flightless with age)
  • Kagu (a flightless bird of New Caledonia, with an extendable crest; is kept in a few zoos around the world)
  • Bustards (there are a number of potential species from four continents - the kori, great, Australian and great Indian would all work well in my view)
  • Kakapo (as with the takahe, except if anything even more charismatic - however there are none currently in zoos)
  • Crowned pigeon (any of the four species would work, although the Victoria crowned is most familiar)

I have tried to ensure that only birds above a certain weight (around 2kg) are included - if there was the option to go smaller then there are many other available species such as other flightless rails, pheasants, partridges, quail, junglefowl and prairie chickens, guineafowl, roadrunners and a larger variety of ducks.

A couple of birds I didn't consider:
  • Kiwi (these are only visible inside nocturnal houses; at zoos where these birds are kept in standard aviaries, even the keepers often struggle to see them)
  • Vultures (I know a number of zoos keep flight-restricted vultures in open paddocks, but I would rather be keeping these birds as flight-capable in an aviary)
 
Cranes in general would be great. Personally I like the red-crowned crane and white-naped crane and they go nicely with some of the NE Asian species we have seen (or are expected).
 
Considering the significance that cranes, pheasants and cormorants have in East Asia, the absence of all of them would hurt the feeling of such a zone in Planet Zoo. In fact, I struggle to think of a real zoo that has a 'Chinese' zone that doesn't have at least one of those three groups of birds living there.

There is so much potential that I really wouldn't want there to only be enough bird species to count on one hand.
 
I would really love at least one cassowary species, emus, ocellated turkeys, himalayan monal, penguins, flamingos, herons, shoebills, and secretary birds.

Vultures and kiwis too!

In reality, I'm really hoping for some sort of avian DLC that includes a wide variety of bird species and an aviary system. Kiwi (and some owls) I could see being introduced along with some sort of nocturnal animal DLC pack that includes nocturnal animal-specific lighting units and other items specific to nocturnal fauna.
 
Considering the significance that cranes, pheasants and cormorants have in East Asia, the absence of all of them would hurt the feeling of such a zone in Planet Zoo. In fact, I struggle to think of a real zoo that has a 'Chinese' zone that doesn't have at least one of those three groups of birds living there.

There is so much potential that I really wouldn't want there to only be enough bird species to count on one hand.
I like your POV, birds (or) animals with a cultural importance to a specific region... Makes sense
 
Any of these would be great additions.
I've always loved those zoos that have mixed enclosures with birds alongside the 'big-ticket' animals, normally mammals. Put any ungulate or small mammal (that doesn't eat birds) with any ground or water bird (specially the latter) and the enclosure becomes much more enriched, educative and 100x times more visually appealing.

 
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think ground and avian type birds would be nice.. Conservation for our parrots is something else to consider.. will add that one next.
 
I have been looking at the list and realised a few other possible ground birds that I had missed out from the original list.
  • The first birds are the kiwis, which I have reconsidered. There are a number of nocturnal or generally inactive species (think aardvarks, pangolins, most big cats and wolves) that are uncharacteristically active in the game already, so on balance I would say a kiwi could work. At least five species are kept in captivity, although only one occurs outside New Zealand. Ultimately, I wouldn't mind which species was included.
  • Brown eared-pheasant (this is a vulnerable species that, like the Himalayan monal, shares its native range and habitat with the snow leopard)
  • Gannets (three species that are all kept in captivity to some extent; at least one zoo (Artis in the Netherlands) keep theirs in an open-topped display with penguins; I would probably choose the endangered Cape gannet, as all three species look quite similar)
  • Ground hornbills (two species from Africa, with the Southern ground probably being the better-known; both have been kept mixed with large herbivores such as warthogs and giraffes)
 
The aardvark is often active at dawn/dusk as well as at night. Wolves are mostly diurnal and none of the in-game big cats are especially nocturnal. I can't speak for the pangolin, but the others listed quite often come out in the day-time in real zoos. Kiwi are completely nocturnal. I know of only one bird that was diurnal, but it was a rescued bird and had no value for breeding, so it was trained to be diurnal to be used for educational purposes.

I think Frontier could quite easily allow for a system to build nocturnal houses, given the building options we already have. All it would take would be special lighting, and we already have the "do not disturb" signs.
 
Aardvarks in zoos are almost completely nocturnal - my local zoo has had a breeding group of four individuals for well over a decade and over the course of that time (probably over 100 visits) I can count on one hand the number of times any have been active during opening hours. The only time they go outside is when they are shut out when the enclosure is deep-cleaned. Other than that, they will sleep through everything.

As for the big cats and wolves, they fall under the banner of 'generally inactive' in my post above, rather than 'nocturnal'. Wolves spend about half a day sleeping and big cats (lions and tigers particularly) sleep about 20 hours a day. Neither animal is so inactive in Planet Zoo because to be honest I'm not sure how many people would pay to just watch virtual animals sleep, no matter how realistic it is.

The way I would address nocturnal houses is just have some nocturnal animals that can be kept outdoors but have space requirements small enough to be kept in a relatively small nocturnal house exhibit if that is so desired. There are very few animals kept exclusively in nocturnal houses in zoos as it is.
 
The way I would address nocturnal houses is just have some nocturnal animals that can be kept outdoors but have space requirements small enough to be kept in a relatively small nocturnal house exhibit if that is so desired. There are very few animals kept exclusively in nocturnal houses in zoos as it is.
Yes, but kiwis are one of those animals. I do some work with them through the Department of Conservation (Operation NEST EGG) and through my volunteering at my local zoo. The zoo has a nocturnal house for day-time viewing and does night-tours for the kiwi kept in the outdoor areas (those kiwi literally never come out in the day-time).
 
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