need a stealth indicator on HUD or radar while sneaking around

Horizon Zero Dawn, and Cyberpunk, both games I've played recently, have a UI element that indicates if you are hidden or being spotted. Something like this would be ultra helpful for sneaking around.

Either the enemy's radar mark should indicate if they see you or not (perhaps with a color code, or symbol), or something in the middle of the screen can indicate if you are hidden or visible (lots of games like Horizon do it with an "eye" symbol that gets bigger/smaller). Cyberpunk has a "spotted" noise that happens as soon as an enemy starts seeing you - and gives you a couple second build-up until they full-on spot you and become aggressive. These mechanics are super helpful for sneaking around, and would be nice to have something like that in Odyssey.
 
Either the enemy's radar mark should indicate if they see you or not
I'm not so sure I would like this.
Why should we get 'a magical clue' whether THEY can see us or not. What sensors have this capability, to detect if someone else is seeing us?
Probing their mind/data systems? And then transfer that intel to our own suits & HUD?

I can understand why some games do this though, but I rather like the challenge of having to evaluate and accomplish this by my own skills.
 
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What sensors have this capability, to detect if someone else is seeing us?
Probing their mind/data systems? And then transfer that intel to our own suits & HUD?

Ok fair point. Perhaps having it detect each individual enemy is too much.

So we can do it like Horizon: Zero Dawn. The suit can detect enemies in visible range, and if they have line-of-sight to you. So a general hidden/visible indicator would work without being unrealistic.
 
Even MGS5 has that halo effect when someone can see you. Stealth can be improved a little. But I wouldn't mind if this a feature you can get through engineering.
 
Why should we get 'a magical clue' whether THEY can see us or not.
Because 30+ years of experimenting with different ideas in video games has proved that this is pretty much required for a good stealth game. You can omit it, but then you don't have a good stealth game. Just like we decided using a scroll bar to scroll a page was a better idea than taking a dump on the keyboard. You can omit it, but then your PC smells like poop.

And maybe you haven't paid enough attention to notice, but you have this ability in real life - it is now quite well known that there are areas in your brain that only light up when someone is looking directly at YOU (that is, their eyes are pointing at you +/- a few degrees), and you can notice if they react to your presence in a negative way. Even if you aren't looking directly back at them you can sense this (although the false positive / false negative rate does increase the further they are into your peripheral vision, becoming wildly innacurate once they are beyond it / behind you).
 
I'm not so sure I would like this.
Why should we get 'a magical clue' whether THEY can see us or not. What sensors have this capability, to detect if someone else is seeing us?
Probing their mind/data systems? And then transfer that intel to our own suits & HUD?

I can understand why some games do this though, but I rather like the challenge of having to evaluate and accomplish this by my own skills.
So you want realism, eh? You're one of those?
 
I'm not sure about the proposed solution, but I agree about the problem. Stealth/infiltration gameplay is currently very basic and poor, quite difficult, and also very punitive since any mistake causes mission failure (and, usually, death).

There are many ways Frontier could improve it, some of them mentioned in this thread. There are dozens of stealth games (or games with some good stealth gameplay) from which to take inspiration, an I guess Frontier being a game dev knows them as well as we do. I don't know in which specific direction they want to take their game, but they should do something.
 
We're not Sam Fisher, Aloi, Solid Snake or any other highly trained operative, hunter or soldier. We're just pilots pushing our luck. Sure, make a spotted meter a feature of a stealth suit, but we've got no business having an innate sixth sense for being seen.
 
We're not Sam Fisher, Aloi, Solid Snake or any other highly trained operative, hunter or soldier. We're just pilots pushing our luck. Sure, make a spotted meter a feature of a stealth suit, but we've got no business having an innate sixth sense for being seen.
Then remove the gimmicky covert missions (hey, that's Frontier wording, not ours) completely.
 
Horizon Zero Dawn, and Cyberpunk, both games I've played recently, have a UI element that indicates if you are hidden or being spotted. Something like this would be ultra helpful for sneaking around.

Either the enemy's radar mark should indicate if they see you or not (perhaps with a color code, or symbol), or something in the middle of the screen can indicate if you are hidden or visible (lots of games like Horizon do it with an "eye" symbol that gets bigger/smaller). Cyberpunk has a "spotted" noise that happens as soon as an enemy starts seeing you - and gives you a couple second build-up until they full-on spot you and become aggressive. These mechanics are super helpful for sneaking around, and would be nice to have something like that in Odyssey.
I think you are picking a wrong benchmark here. Look at Escape From Tarkov, there are no indicators but there is plenty of "stealth".
We already have a radar in Odyssey, and if that arrow pointing at you and there is nothing between you and arrow, than it sees you(unless it doesn't when you are " 5meters too far"). I object an idea that something at our back should indicate that enemy is about to see us.
Saying that, it would be great if we could have a more complex behavior for NPC so when the see us they would try to communicate (through radio outdoors) and have different scenarios based on the situation.
 
Ok fair point. Perhaps having it detect each individual enemy is too much.

So we can do it like Horizon: Zero Dawn. The suit can detect enemies in visible range, and if they have line-of-sight to you. So a general hidden/visible indicator would work without being unrealistic.
That, whilst more realistic, would be confusing for most players who expect a stealth indicator to be a straight "have they seen me or not" answer. Another realistic option with less ambiguity would be to have an indicator to tell you if an enemy is in the process of radioing out for help. Still feels somewhat game-y, but useful info is useful info.
 
Then remove the gimmicky covert missions (hey, that's Frontier wording, not ours) completely.
Or just give us a specialised stealth suit that offers these kinds of stealth gameplay features.

It could come with some kind of hack tool for setting up distractions, a set of stealth blankets for hiding bodies, and all the UI elements that stealth games have. You get the picture.
 
Then remove the gimmicky covert missions (hey, that's Frontier wording, not ours) completely.
Why? If you do not like it, doesn't mean no one does. I enjoy data stealing missions, and there is nothing gimmicky about them, the NPC behavior needs some work though.
 
Why? If you do not like it, doesn't mean no one does. I enjoy data stealing missions, and there is nothing gimmicky about them, the NPC behavior needs some work though.
I don't know, but half-baked feature is a half-baked feature. I'm not saying it can't/won't improve, but in this state, stealth mechanic is very rough, if you can call crouching a 'stealth mechanic'.
 
Sounds like too many people outside of their comfort zone. The NPCs react when they notice you, they turn to look at you (they even lookup through skylights), they talk, make sounds, come up to you and scan you, maybe this could be made more obvious like some more radio chatter ("is that someone on the roof?" or "whats he doing outside the window") or hand gestures. I would actually like to see a more aggressive stance to be spotted, not shoot on sight but coming to look whats going on if you are in a strange location like on top of a roof or constantly spotted outside a window or crouching behind a crate. I think the problem is more with the drones, maybe they could have a light to mean they are "locked" onto you and following you, maybe they do but I need to check. I would like to hear more constructive potential for enhancing the current environment cue based experience (something we know they are keen on building) rather than the traditional trope.
 
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