Planet orbiting just outside te asteroid belt of a gas giant.

Came across this planet while doing a Salvage mission.

Very peculiar how the planet is in perfect orbit just outside the asteroid belt surrounding the gas giant.

Realistically, wouldn't this planets gravity cause the asteroid belt to be pulled into the planet causing it to be constantly bombarded by impactors?

Will try to get some images from the surface once I touch down.

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Moons close to or inside ring systems will clear a path over time though they may cause waves in the nearby particles. This is a pic of Daphnis inside Saturn's ring system that shows it:

 
Moons close to or inside ring systems will clear a path over time though they may cause waves in the nearby particles. This is a pic of Daphnis inside Saturn's ring system that shows it:

http://i.imgur.com/plOj8P7.jpg
This. They're called 'Shepherd Moons' and they keep the rings in check.

I found one on my first exploration trip that was so close to the ring that the outer edge of the ring was still within the moon's frame of reference. You could park in the edge and watch the ring's asteroids whizzing past you at thousands of km per hour. Thankfully, the solid ones didn't render so my ship wasn't pulverized. It was a very weird experience.
 
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This. They're called 'Shepherd Moons' and they keep the rings in check.

I found one on my first exploration trip that was so close to the ring that the outer edge of the ring was still within the moon's frame of reference. You could park in the edge and watch the ring's asteroids whizzing past you at thousands of km per hour. Thankfully, the solid ones didn't render so my ship wasn't pulverized. It was a very weird experience.
There's another place you can observe that effect, at the boundary between multiple rings of the same body. If you're in the reference frame of the A ring and you fly towards the B ring, you'll see them move at different speeds. It often looks silly or just plain wrong according to orbital mechanics, but it is interesting to see nonetheless.
 
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