Post your interesting Orreries here

Since an orrery is (traditionally) a large, complicated, expensive piece of machinery, the subject of the plural form of "orrery" never really came up in the Middle Ages, because nobody ever owned more than one. But I believe the plural form is "orreries".

As for the OP's point, I'm sure I can go back and find some of those high-eccentric ELW systems I've fully scanned; it should give me an orrery map.
 
I am surprised there isn't a thread for this,
Hah, I almost made this very thread last night! Here are a few I've found so far.


This is a system I found with two planets orbiting way off axis:


Here is a system which had two stars orbiting each other in unusual circular patterns, each with large planet arrays of their own:


Here is a system with four gas giants, all of them having numerous moons, but two of the GG's had wildly off axis orbits:
 
Here is a system which had two stars orbiting each other in unusual circular patterns, each with large planet arrays of their own:
Wow, that is a weird system... Trying to visualize the possible ways these stars can be orbiting I only come with a completely synchronous orbit where the stars are circling in an opposite direction and are always both in the same (well, in an opposite kinda way) position of the orbit. The orrery seems to confirm this though with one picture we're unable to make a definitive assessment.
If so, the stars have the exact same orbital period and - judging from the seemingly same diameters of orbits - the combined mass of a star and its planets must be more or less the same for both solar systems.

One would think such an arrangement is impossible for long as surely not all factors can be exactly the same but scientists have shown how some systems are "self-rectifying", like a bicycle with the speed high enough will rectify its upward position even with bumps on its way... With gravitational forces this makes Lagrange points possible and gravity not only allows them but can push nearby objects into these positions. If I'm completely off here, please correct me, always willing to learn more.
 
Wow, that is a weird system... Trying to visualize the possible ways these stars can be orbiting I only come with a completely synchronous orbit where the stars are circling in an opposite direction and are always both in the same (well, in an opposite kinda way) position of the orbit.
It's a binary orbit with the barycenter outside both bodies, and the bodies both having eccentric orbits. For a good visualization of how bodies move in all kinds of two-body orbits, check the Gallery on the Barycenter Wikipedia article. Your example is this one:


From elsewhere, here's what I found before Chapter Four:

It's ironic that the FSS changes mean that such extremely rare systems are much more likely to be passed up by explorers now, if they don't have any rare body types. Out of 56,000 systems now, I only found one such.


As for other examples... check out systems where there are two or more stars with their own planets, and also planets which co-orbit more than a single star. These tend to look pretty well, and can make some interesting configurations. If the game could handle more than one stellar light source, then day-night cycles on planets would be quite complex.
Here's an example:

Stars A and B orbit each other very closely. C is relatively close as well, so most planets orbit ABC. D orbits farther off. Also, there's an ELW each in both ABC and D. Most interesting is that the game also appears to visualize ABC's barycenter, which is a good touch.


Oh, and the part about physics, since you did specifically ask for that.
The part where you said that "(...) gravity not only allows [Lagrange points] but can push nearby objects into these positions". Gravity doesn't push anything (as far as we know), what happens is that over time, orbits might "drift" into the Lagrange points. Not all orbits are stable, after all. What's quite curious is that the reverse also holds true: under specific circumstances, bodies might also leave them. So it's not like L-points are a trap: rather, they are places where the "orbital" forces (gravity, centripetal force, and so on) all combine in a way that a body there will maintain its relative position towards the two bodies making up the system.
 
Last edited:
To my surprise orrery shows rings around GGs much less schematic, than I thought :)



However this feature doesn't work with the most extended ring systems.
 
Last edited:
And here's a couple of extremely eccentric ELWs. Not my discoveries, but visited long ago, so their orreries are now visible to me from the galmap.
As underwhelming as the orrery may have appeared at first with it's minimalist nature, it has really grown on me. The old system map did show the numbers, but being able to actually see all of those numbers in action is very fascinating.

That second system you posted above, those are comet level orbits, especially the second one. Leaves me pondering exactly how that would have formed, especially an earthlike.
 
oh Orreries ,,,,, For a second i thought it said ovaries. Not having any I started looking around the room for female volunteers.

Carry on
Caliber
 
Here's a perfectly ordinary-looking system...


...or is it? Take a closer look at planets 6 and 7. That's right, they're a Trojan pair: Planet 7 is in one of Planet 6's Lagrange points (and, technically, vice-versa too). You'll notice they share exactly the same orbit, and form an equilateral triangle with each other and the central star - classical Lagrange Point geometry.



You used to need to physically fly out above the orbital plane and take pics with orbit lines on, to get this evidence. With the orrery map, it's much easier.
 
Here's a perfectly ordinary-looking system...


...or is it? Take a closer look at planets 6 and 7. That's right, they're a Trojan pair: Planet 7 is in one of Planet 6's Lagrange points (and, technically, vice-versa too). You'll notice they share exactly the same orbit, and form an equilateral triangle with each other and the central star - classical Lagrange Point geometry.
That's really cool! It's very nice to be able to see this clearly, in the new orrery. What is the mass of planet 6? For the system to be truly stable, they should have significantly different masses. That is, the larger object should have at least 25x the mass of the smaller, and even better if it's more like 100x. Otherwise it's a StellarForge "cheat". :)
 
Last edited:
That's really cool! It's very nice to be able to see this clearly, in the new orrery. What is the mass of planet 6? For the system to be truly stable, they should have significantly different masses. That is, the larger object should have at least 25x the mass of the smaller, and even better if it's more like 100x. Otherwise it's a StellarForge "cheat".
Looking at the stats I posted in the thread I linked to above, planet 6 (Class III gas giant) is 1070 earth-masses, planet 7 (water world) is 1.76 E-Ms, so that's 607x - easily meeting your parameters.
 
Last edited:
Here you go:



Hard to see from the image, but the two planets' orbital planes are roughly perpendicular to each other, and they're both heavily angled from the orbital plane of the binary pair.
 
Two rocky bodies orbiting a Red Giant orbiting a Back Hole.

At first they look quite common, the distance between them is 0.21 Ls:
But...
Do I think correctly that they're virtually stationary relative to each other?
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom