General / Off-Topic Recycle or Die! (the elite environmental thread)

Status
Thread Closed: Not open for further replies.
The thing about repair is that it does have it's own environmental consequences. Firstly you need to ship the broken machinery to a repairer and back. Also the cleaning products may be far-from green, and you need to keep a stock of spare parts that need to be made. Is it better to send someone a new unit, or have someone send back the old one - have it repaired - and then ship it back to the customer? - all to keep older tech going that may be less efficient than it's replacement. Sometimes you only buy a short time, because it's basically worn out, so the environmental cost of resus is actually a significant component of the environmental impact of a product that really ought to be replaced.

It is not always as black-and-white as people seem to think.
All true and one of the reasons I try to understand everything I own or to some degree.

I own very little that I cannot conduct basic diagnostics and repairs on myself. If something of mine breaks, I will be able to figure out why, and I will be able to make an informed decision on whether the repair is worth my time, or someone else's time for the uncommon cases when they might be able to do a better job, or the same job for less.

This seems to be an uncommon sort of thing and by and large, people are far too willing to replace what could easily be repaired and returned to service, often defaulting to replacement purely out of ignorance.

I have a pile of fairly decent laptops (nothing too high end, but enough that I can make sure everyone in my wife's large extended family always has something suitably practical) that originated from my wife's co-workers and students. They, like many computer illiterates (and computer illiteracy is on the rise...as something enters the mainstream, the expectation that anyone need know about it's inner workings to use it vanishes) are at a total loss when something goes wrong, and falling costs of electronics has made replacement competitive with professional repair. I give out free advice, but as often as not these people would rather sell me their stuff when it's due to be wiped OS reinstall than pay someone to do it...on the dubious assumption that something new and shiny will be able to overcome habitual user error. So, I can wind up with something that would still retail for several hundred dollars and all I have to do in exchange is salvage some files.

Of course, some things are beyond hope or have reached the end of their utility and need to be replaced. The trick is knowing the difference.
 
I hear you (both!).

I started a thread years ago about trying to find the 'best' producers of computer parts for those of an environmentally concerned mind. It is a bit of an oxymoron in some aspects, but so much of the modern world runs and relies on computer technology that i was interested in doing as much as i could in this sector of my life as well.

But as Morbad mentions, the very best thing is to have as little tech as possible. I subscribe to that also, no smart phones in this house etc, and i keep computers for as long as they work (mostly). So currently i have a Athlon64 based Windows XP machine (i use offline and it has some tools i use that work best on it's platform vs my newer PC), a 'current' i5 gaming/work system (Windows 7) and a to be used 'soon' new build m-itx gaming system with a Ryzen CPU, this will be for my eldest boy in a few years or so. And 3 laptops the family uses (everything from this crusty Vista era (now Linux Mint) laptop i post online stuff with to newer AMD based ones).

I could have more or newer systems more often but i prefer to keep the older still functional stuff going as long as possible. But even that can have draw backs. For example that Athlon64 Windows XP system uses more electricity than my newer desktops, so you have to keep that kind of stuff in mind also.

Anyway i can't remember if i posted that thread about 'environmental tech' here or somewhere else? It was based off a green peace report iirc? Might have been this (or an older version?):


Anyway it is not easy, but from a PC builder perspective it seemed Gigabyte were one of the leading brands in terms of their efforts to reduce their environmental impact etc. It might be different now, but as i found in the lost original thread i made on the topic, it is actually really hard as a PC tech person to get clear solid details on the subject.

-----------------

In other news Africa is set to be a world leader in using renewables:

'Africa poised to lead way in global green revolution, says report':


Africa is poised to lead the world’s cleanest economic revolution by using renewable energy sources to power a massive spread of urbanisation, says an IEA report.

The IEA, or International Energy Agency, predicts that solar energy will play a big role in supporting the continent’s growing population and industrialisation over the next 20 years.

Africa has less than half the solar power installations seen in the UK, despite the sunnier conditions, but the IEA is predicting a solar boom in countries across the continent, which could give hundreds of millions of homes electricity for the first time.
Sounds awesome :)
 
'Climate change: Sea ice loss linked to spread of deadly virus':


The decline in sea ice seen in the Arctic in recent decades has been linked by scientists to the spread of a deadly virus in marine mammals.

Researchers found that Phocine distemper virus (PDV) had spread from animals in the North Atlantic to populations in the North Pacific.

The scientists say the spread of pathogens could become more common as ice declines further. The 15-year study tracked seals, sea lions and otters via satellite.
 
Nasty floods all across north-central UK currently, here are some pics with a few links to the stories in the article:


Now reading through the 'news' on these floods what is being said is they are not directly being attributed to AGW causes (although the rain fall has been well above normal, that can 'just happen') but indirectly it is. The flooding in Doncaster is being blamed on the flood defences they built in Sheffield back in 2015-16, and that is now causing bigger problems 'further down' the river tracks etc.

So when people say we can, for example, mitigate rising sea levels by building walls and sea defences etc, what that idea does not take into account is the local 'knock-on' effect. More rain events, higher tides are all just bad news and going to be huge forces for change across the world, economically as much as anything else.
 
Nasty floods all across north-central UK currently, here are some pics with a few links to the stories in the article:


Now reading through the 'news' on these floods what is being said is they are not directly being attributed to AGW causes (although the rain fall has been well above normal, that can 'just happen') but indirectly it is. The flooding in Doncaster is being blamed on the flood defences they built in Sheffield back in 2015-16, and that is now causing bigger problems 'further down' the river tracks etc.

So when people say we can, for example, mitigate rising sea levels by building walls and sea defences etc, what that idea does not take into account is the local 'knock-on' effect. More rain events, higher tides are all just bad news and going to be huge forces for change across the world, economically as much as anything else.
This happens all of the time. Those areas that have wealth and possible an M.P or two living there. Get good flood defenses and the means to move the water away, but then that either means, those upstream, get flooded out, or those downstream get flooded out. The river Medway has excellent flood prevention systems around the Tunbridge (a very well off area) areas, but this means, all the local towns up and downsteam, all suffer worse flooding.
 
This happens all of the time. Those areas that have wealth and possible an M.P or two living there. Get good flood defenses and the means to move the water away, but then that either means, those upstream, get flooded out, or those downstream get flooded out. The river Medway has excellent flood prevention systems around the Tunbridge (a very well off area) areas, but this means, all the local towns up and downsteam, all suffer worse flooding.
Sadly true. I was having a discussion around this topic with some Americans, and the same happens over there, but it is interesting that when you posit the global rising tides over the next century to many people, they just say 'we can build flood defences' as if that is easy, not expensive, or not actually effective (as will be the case for many of the worlds cities).

Once the water hits a certain threshold (be it through more extreme regular flood events due to AGW, or rising sea levels), you just can't effectively combat it, you simply have to move. The costs of all that in the near future are going to be crushing.

------------------------

'Australia's climate response among the worst in the G20, report finds':


Australia’s response to climate change is one of the worst in the G20 with a lack of policy, reliance on fossil fuels and rising emissions leaving the country exposed “economically, politically and environmentally”, according to a new international report.

Australia’s progress to meeting its already “unambitious” Paris climate targets was third worst, fossil fuel energy was on the rise and policies to tackle high transport emissions and deforestation were also among the worst across the G20 countries.

The Brown to Green report, now in its fifth year, takes stock of the performance of G20 countries on climate change adaptation and mitigation across key sectors, and in the finance sector.

The chief executive of Climate Analytics, Bill Hare, an Australian co-author of the report, told Guardian Australia: “Australia is behind [on] climate action in nearly every dimension. Australia’s emissions are increasing and there’s virtually no policy in place to reduce them.”
Australia is very much a country in what i would call the 'grip of Murdoch Media', and has been this way for decades, so the above findings are not surprising given that. Still as they struggle with current terrible conditions of those fires you just hope more people are not going to lose their lives :(
 
An interesting experiment going on in Cornwall:

'Cornish homes take part in trial to supply clean power to grid':


Hundreds of homes and businesses in Cornwall have started selling electricity to their local energy network and the national energy system in a pioneering move.

The trial is the first time that traditional energy users – such as homes, hotels and businesses – have acted as suppliers in a microcosm of a full energy system.

The trial harnessed together 100 Cornish homes, fitted with batteries and solar panels, to act as a mini virtual power plant for the local energy network, Western Power Distribution, and the UK’s energy system operator, National Grid. During sunny spells when homes generate more than enough electricity from solar panels they can store the power to use later, or supply the energy system with clean extra power.

The homes took part in the trial alongside 150 local businesses, which were prepared to adjust how much energy they used depending on the balance of energy supply and demand on the grid. If wind and solar power output dropped the companies could choose to use less electricity in exchange for a payment from National Grid, or if the local grid had more electricity than it needed the companies could ramp up their energy demand.

National Grid already offers to pay firms that own utility-scale batteries to provide a similar service, but the trial is the first time that companies can take part in the same “local energy market” as the network operator. The market was designed by energy giant Centrica and modelled on the same system used to balance energy markets across Europe. The energy companies believe the trial could help create a nationwide chain of flexible smart grids built around clean energy.

Pieter-Jan Mermans, a director at Centrica Business Solutions, described the trial as “a milestone moment for the energy network” after years of research.
Sounds awesome and exactly the kind of project we all need to move towards to have better energy security, redundancy and green local based energy solutions. I'll be keeping an eye on the project and reporting back the results and conclusions.
 
Human Psychology 101, though. We tend to rely on emotion and intuition more than we'd like to think. This is probably because they're quick, approximate reckonings that enable decisions to be taken as events unfold, which is handy when you need a decision right now about whether to fight, run away from or ...engage in conjugal activity.. with the person you've just encountered. Rationalisation is something we typically do to justify what our intuition has already decided for us & we can take considerable time making rational choices, looking at facts and options and weighing them against one-another. It's an uncomfortable feeling of cognitive dissonance when your intuition tells you to take one decision, but spending a few minutes thinking it through tells you it isn't the right one.

We like to believe we're rational, considered animals. But we're not - we're chaotic, illogical but predictable creatures of habit.
 
I have zero idea what 'feelz' even is, never seen it written or talked about anywhere, so just based on the 'quality' of that posters contributions so far to this thread, i have to accept it is not worth my time trying to sort through their self confusions and abstract language choice to even try to understand what they are attempting to communicate. Just not worth my time for their level of contribution (i'm not even sure what they are posting here for? Is it in protest or something? This is the thread about environmental issues. There is another thread for them to prove their belief in ;) ).
 
So we had those Amazon 'worst yet' forrest fires, then the recent ones in California (that looked pretty bad), so now it is Australia's turn :(

Australia bushfires: Record number of emergencies in New South Wales




:(
On the sidenote, at the very least in California, wildfires are pretty much integral part of the natural cycle - some species like the giant sequoia in fact need it. This cycle is being continuously broken by fire prevention, which means accumulation of lot of combustible material, hence when there is a fire, things get bad quickly.
 
Status
Thread Closed: Not open for further replies.
Top Bottom