Ships run hotter flying over planet surfaces

So I was flying my cold ship to see if it was possible to sneak into a trespass zone without incurring fines (*spoilers* you can't) when i noticed using thrusters to move around seems to generate a lot of heat. now my ship runs with with G5 clean drives and a G5 low emissions power plant, i can use my thrusters all i want (short of boosting) out in space and will only generate around 15-18% heat. but above the planet's surface, with everything else turned off, i generate about 27% heat while using my thrusters. i've no idea why this would be but i'm glad i'm finding this out now while i'm screwing around instead of when i'm trying to sneak into a planetary base.
 
Yup. I've had ships that would melt if i boosted and manouvered at the same time on a high G world.

Engines have to work harder to fight gravity, so increased heat. Low G worlds have less effect than high G ones.
 
Plus all planets have some (even if minuscule) atmosphere, which is another resistance. Resistance that must be countered by thrust - generating heat...
 
Lakons are particularly prone to heat overload if you try to hyperspace jump from a low altitude. Best to escape vector/orbital cruise ascent and then jump from a higher altitude.
 
Its a shame, they haven't been as detailed when comparing the light and the dark side of planets.

The light side stays the same as the dark, I would expect the dark to run your ship colder.
 
This is one case where I wish they'd just throw reality out the window. Being able to fight over the surface of a planet (as opposed to empty space) would be absolutely awesome, but having your ship melt just trying to maneuver...sometimes I think the devs hate us.
 
The heat is due to the thrusters running in an overcharged state, engineering fixes the issue if you plan to have a dedicated surface combat ship.
 
Its a shame, they haven't been as detailed when comparing the light and the dark side of planets.

The light side stays the same as the dark, I would expect the dark to run your ship colder.
I would not, at least not on airless planets. There simply isn't any matter to get the 'heat message' across. Sure there is a temperature, but what does that mean in a vacuum?

In many movies you see someone instantly freeze when he is exposed to empty space, while in reality someone would die from hypothermia after 45 minutes. The vacuum itself is more deadly.
 
If you fight in a conflict zone close to the planets you'll also run hotter as the thrusters are counteracting the gravitational pull. Realized this when my otherwise cold Viper Mk3 suddenly started overheating like crazy.

After bailing from the action and turning engines off and looking at the outside view the thrusters were all still firing to prevent ship from drifting towards planet.

This only gets more pronounced the closer you are to the planet and especially once you are inside the orbital cruise threshold.
 
If you fight in a conflict zone close to the planets you'll also run hotter as the thrusters are counteracting the gravitational pull. Realized this when my otherwise cold Viper Mk3 suddenly started overheating like crazy.

After bailing from the action and turning engines off and looking at the outside view the thrusters were all still firing to prevent ship from drifting towards planet.

This only gets more pronounced the closer you are to the planet and especially once you are inside the orbital cruise threshold.
Really is only a problem if your ship generally runs hot, and you fly with flight assist engaged.
 
I would not, at least not on airless planets. There simply isn't any matter to get the 'heat message' across. Sure there is a temperature, but what does that mean in a vacuum?

In many movies you see someone instantly freeze when he is exposed to empty space, while in reality someone would die from hypothermia after 45 minutes. The vacuum itself is more deadly.
Heat is only transferred in 3 ways.

Radiation - emitted (radiated) away.
Convection - through gas or fluids.
Conduction - through direct contact between substances.

In the vacuum of space you don't have gas or fluids, thus ruling out convection. Nor do you have any direct contact with other substances, which rules out conduction.

That means an object in space, such as a person floating around or a spaceship can only get rid of heat through radiation which is not as efficient as the other methods. Other ways is transferring heat to an object, e.g. heat sinks, and ejecting the object.

This really means you'll suffocate and die long before you freeze to death in space.

However, while in the dark side of a planet you are not increasing your heat from radiation from the star so while you aren't "cooling off" you are certainly seeing a decrease as far as radiated heat from the star goes. Which means you heat up slower while on the dark side of a planet rather than lose heat faster.

Really is only a problem if your ship generally runs hot, and you fly with flight assist engaged.
True, but with FA-OFF you'll keep getting 'dragged' towards planet and need to compensate for that anyways at some point.
 
However, while in the dark side of a planet you are not increasing your heat from radiation from the star so while you aren't "cooling off" you are certainly seeing a decrease as far as radiated heat from the star goes. Which means you heat up slower while on the dark side of a planet rather than lose heat faster.
Yeah, in a measurable way, not in a noticeable way, or at least not in a way to waste any developer time to try to reproduce entropy in a video game. I think they left out Hawkins's radiation as well :D
 
True, but with FA-OFF you'll keep getting 'dragged' towards planet and need to compensate for that anyways at some point.
Manual compensation FA-OFF is incredibly more efficient than letting flight assist do the thruster work. Try it yourself, the heat buildup is minimal when manually handling the thrusters.
 
Manual compensation FA-OFF is incredibly more efficient than letting flight assist do the thruster work. Try it yourself, the heat buildup is minimal when manually handling the thrusters.
My problem with FA-OFF is that the controls get a bit too sensitive. I tend to overcompensate and then overshoot when trying to aim at things. Maybe I am just too used to the FA-ON flight model though.

This isn't me... but it's pretty much what it looks like when I fly FA-OFF though...

 
My problem with FA-OFF is that the controls get a bit too sensitive. I tend to overcompensate and then overshoot when trying to aim at things. Maybe I am just too used to the FA-ON flight model though.

This isn't me... but it's pretty much what it looks like when I fly FA-OFF though...

https://thumbs.gfycat.com/IllegalImportantElectriceel-size_restricted.gif
I still get a good laugh whenever I see my friend flail about trying to FA-Off land his cutter :D (If anyone's curious, here's the high-res version: https://gfycat.com/IllegalImportantElectriceel )

Regarding FA-Off on planetary surfaces to reduce the heat - definitely trying that next time I get into a scrap. Now about not crashing...
 
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