Show us your interesting discoveries!

Did you try setting down nearby and driving up, looks like it would be fun.
No, I didn't. I don't think it would have been possible except maybe for those 'northern & southern' faces, and even then, being a low-g body, it would have been an arduous task. From the top, looking down over the edge of that visible face - what a drop!! It would make for a base-jumper's dream. Maybe when we get space legs??? :ROFLMAO:
 
No, I didn't. I don't think it would have been possible except maybe for those 'northern & southern' faces, and even then, being a low-g body, it would have been an arduous task. From the top, looking down over the edge of that visible face - what a drop!! It would make for a base-jumper's dream. Maybe when we get space legs??? :ROFLMAO:
You want to walk up it?
 
Not sure if I should've posted this [here], or in this thread... But I guess if this isn't special, you're gonna tell me right away. ;)

So, while exploring Odin's Hold, I came across what appeared to be an interesting high metal content world, one with an atmosphere consisting of ≥99% water. What piqued my interest was not the composition of the atmosphere however, but the fact that there were a few bright, yellow spots on it according to the FSS, so I decided to investigate:

elite-184-yellowstuff-01.jpg

According to the full spectrum system scanner, the world showed signs of silicate-based volcanism as well. Given that the world's atmosphere was basically all water steam, I wasn't sure what I was looking at there. Storms? No, right? Doesn't exactly look like it. What then, volcanism of some sort? I'm not sure.

elite-185-yellowstuff-02.jpg

Maybe some seasoned explorers can shed some light on this. Feels like I've found something special, but past experience tells me, that that's likely not the case. ;)

So, what exactly is this?
 
Just now I jumped into a class M red dwarf system, when I was immediately greeted not just by the star, but also by a pretty close friend of it:

elite-186-oblate-hot-jupiter-1.jpg
A hot class V gas giant with a semi-major axis of ~2.3Ls at an orbital eccentricity of just 0.0425

The large gas giant orbits its parent star in just 0.2 days, and is tidally locked to it as well.

elite-187-oblate-hot-jupiter-2.jpg
2.22Ls from both star and planet

Now lets take a look at just how oblate it is:

elite-188-oblate-hot-jupiter-3.jpg
What an egg...

It's even more visible when seen like this:

elite-189-oblate-hot-jupiter-4lq.jpg
The oblate class V gas giant seen in front of its parent star

It's funny how the exclusion zone of oblate bodies is still spherical. So you can get much closer to the equator of the planet while within a frameshift bubble as when compared to the polar regions. I wonder if there is a body so oblate that its surface would actually extend beyond its own exclusion zone. That'd be pretty funny. ;)

System is [Eok Gree GS-H b15-20], body [A 1].
 
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Just now I jumped into a class M red dwarf system, when I was immediately greeted not just by the star, but also by a pretty close friend of it:

A hot class V gas giant with a semi-major axis of ~2.3Ls at an orbital eccentricity of just 0.0425

The large gas giant orbits its parent star in just 0.2 days, and is tidally locked to it as well.

2.22Ls from both star and planet

Now lets take a look at just how oblate it is:

What an egg...

It's even more visible when seen like this:

The oblate class V gas giant seen in front of its parent star

It's funny how the exclusion zone of oblate bodies is still spherical. So you can get much closer to the equator of the planet while within a frameshift bubble as when compared to the polar regions. I wonder if there is a body so oblate that its surface would actually extend beyond its own exclusion zone. That'd be pretty funny. ;)

System is [Eok Gree GS-H b15-20], body [A 1].
They calculate zones from the centre according to the radius of the body, Orbital cruise, exclusions zone etc, it's only shortly after you after you drop into glide on landable bodies they start calculating height from the actual surface rather than the ideal generated spherical zone, usually around 30km up.
 
Uh, I don't even know how the radii are being measured. 😓 From centre to equator, or from centre to pole? Or is it an average.. If its centre to equator, than an oblate body crossing over its own exclusion zone wouldn't be possible...
 
Uh, I don't even know how the radii are being measured. 😓 From centre to equator, or from centre to pole? Or is it an average.. If its centre to equator, than an oblate body crossing over its own exclusion zone wouldn't be possible...
Yes that's an interesting question, and the answer I think is that it's an average and the exclusion zones are deliberately set much farther from the body than strictly necessary simply to avoid those sorts of problems. There's a thing that happens when surface exploring, a lot of us surface explorers call it the "tick", in glide when you get a certain distance from the surface the altimeter jumps, sometimes quite a lot, when it adjusts from calculating distance from the surface based on a perfect sphere to actual distance from the surface as calculated from the actual generated surface.

When you take off the same happens if you jump into SC as soon as you achieve enough height to be out of the mass lock, the altimeter jumps since in SC distance is always calculated from the ideal spherical surface not the generated surface. The other day when I entered SC I found myself changing from +6klm to -42km in height.

Using that behaviour you could probably do enough jumps in different locations into and out of SC to actually work it out, but to be honest I don't think I can really be bothered, it would be a long and boring task.
 
Now to the subject of the thread, interesting discoveries. I just finished my last run of about 350kly and ran into a few oddities. One thing I now wonder is, how small is the smallest ringed landable body? I ask because of this;

A 1,500km ringed landable body.



I found a few other things, a ringed ELW orbiting a Neutron star, a large landable body all posted in the appropriate thread, but is there some lower limit size or is this just the first small ringed boidy I have really noticed?
 
found this gas giant 1500 times earth mass, but has a 7 hour rotation (0.3 earth days) also its in a very nice nebula full of blue-whites and black holes.

also found this planet with multiple rings

and this landable moon orbiting terrifyingly close to its parent. it was so small it only took one probe to full scan it.
 
WoW!!!

That's all I can say, that was remarkable, unprecedented even. I mean we've had bodies that get into scooping range of stars and hard to land on, but this is remarkable.

It all started with this ringed Y class. A program I am testing out called ED Observatory alerted me to its rings, large rings it said, it wasn't kidding either. Normally rings this wide are invisible.



The outer ring is nearly17 million kilometers wide, and as clear as anything, that was the beginning of the strangeness, then I checked the system info further.



Now notice the inner radius of the inner rings, just over 85,000kms, that's a tiny gap, but I wondered, exactly how tiny? How easy to fly through? I thought I should be able to skim the exclusion zone very carefully and get through. Well the answer is it's impossible. The inner edge of the ring is inside the exclusion zone of the star! This is me butted up against the exclusion zone, can't get any closer.



I got kicked out of SC here and the distance from me to the star won't go any lower.

Fly safe all o7
 
I wonder how long it would take to reach the gap with just thrusters? ;)

I'm using the Observatory as well, could very quickly become a standard tool for exploration..
 
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