Show us your interesting discoveries!

Notable Stellar Phenomenon very close to a star. EDIT: If you guys like to find this type of stuff, the region I'm in, Dryman's Point, seems to have a lot. My trip has been 158kly and I hadn't found any until the last 2kly, in this region, where I found 4 systems with them.

153553
 
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The "Elite Observatory" app helped me rediscover old finds. I do not know why, but I did not mark this very unusual planet when I found it at first time. I found it again when I scanned the logs. I'm quite far from this place now I'm in a hurry there, that once again look at it. High gravity 5.68G, and... and... It is special. I will not say, otherwise I will have to drink a few shots! 🍺
By the way, does anyone know how rare an landable ice planet with such notable gravity?

Kyloall YD-S d4-5226( 1)_00001.jpg
 
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Here are the top 10:

Code:
+-----------+----------+--------------------------------+---------+
| EDSM_ID   | systemId | name                           | gravity |
+-----------+----------+--------------------------------+---------+
|  17702066 | 24493412 | Skaudoae ZG-C d13-28 13        | 8.78483 |
|  17702067 | 24493412 | Skaudoae ZG-C d13-28 14        | 8.39256 |
|  11693727 | 19820908 | Slegao VS-B c16-5 AB 3         | 7.67664 |
|  26322441 | 30415964 | Flyae Eaec QP-A c3-39 AB 5     | 7.59216 |
|   8352070 | 16659971 | Prooe Drye FY-S c20-32 12      | 7.51394 |
| 117309219 |  5851863 | Eol Prou JR-W f1-5207 3        | 7.44243 |
|  20808815 | 24071282 | Eol Prou MW-U c3-325 AB 9      | 7.15731 |
|  26144943 | 30280704 | Kyloarph KN-S d4-2421 8        |   6.922 |
|  24563855 | 29245301 | Clooku XK-N d7-160 8           | 6.84703 |
|  25519121 | 29870423 | Prua Phoe BV-O d6-35 10        | 6.67768 |
+-----------+----------+--------------------------------+---------+
 
Oh thanks! Now I want to visit some of them. It will be quite dangerous to move down the slope of the crater, I think it will be difficult to slow down!
 
Whoa, I would've never thought that icy bodies can be this high-g. Considering that the highest-g landable planets - metal-rich and high metal content worlds - range up to 11.01 right now, this is pretty impressive.

According to my own logs, I've never even seen a landable icy body with over 2 g's in almost 16.000 systems. ;)
 
The "Elite Observatory" app helped me rediscover old finds. I do not know why, but I did not mark this very unusual planet when I found it at first time. I found it again when I scanned the logs. I'm quite far from this place now I'm in a hurry there, that once again look at it. High gravity 5.68G, and... and... It is special. I will not say, otherwise I will have to drink a few shots! 🍺
By the way, does anyone know how rare an landable ice planet with such notable gravity?

View attachment 154547
Whoa!
That's the King, Caesar & Goddess of the large landable planets list!
 
Hmm ... Orvidius will probably be able to find larger ones) Thank you! It is strange that this topic is in another section of the forum. I didn’t know about it :rolleyes:
I checked the logs using the Observatory. This landable planet has the largest gravity and radus among all my finds.
It is close to the Colonia. I will return there to complete system scan and then I will give system name. Reported.
 
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Just found this realy strange hmc. I have never seen a hmc with helium atm, only ice worlds. Plus that neon must be doing crazy light shows when a volcano errupts.





Found another crazy one!



Twice as hot as our sun, iron in the atm and almost 90° axial tilt.

Me stumbling into that planet:
 
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Sorry but how the hell can a planet be hotter than a star?! All of physics must have gone to pot!!
Edit: I am an idiot. The star must be waaay hotter. Sorry 'bout that.
 
Sorry but how the hell can a planet be hotter than a star?! All of physics must have gone to pot!!
Edit: I am an idiot. The star must be waaay hotter. Sorry 'bout that.
Hotter than the surface of a star, which is a lot cooler than the center of the star. Still 12,615k seems a bit excessive. Most rocks melt at around 1,200k but rocks don't really boil, I suspect the key point is the atmospheric pressure, which is over 11,000,000 atmospheres, and just like water, the temperature at which rock turns to a gaseous state increases with pressure. I suspect the figures are off somewhere, but with over 12,000,000 atmospheres the calculation is probably correct, the rock would likely remain in a solid state, but the figures the calculations are based or are probably dodgy.

I wouldn't trust the numbers completely though, the Stellar Forge has been known to throw a few dodgy numbers around, but there are known hot exoplanets. KELT-9b orbiting an A class star is over 4600K, well over half the temperature of the suns surface and hotter than many smaller stars, so if it was orbiting an L type dwarf it would be hotter than its star, in fact hotter than M's and also many K's, but then it gets it heat from the fact the A class has a surface temp of 10,000k so if it was orbiting a colder star the planet wouldn't be as hot, still it would be interesting trying to land on a really hot planet!
 
Hotter than the surface of a star, which is a lot cooler than the center of the star. Still 12,615k seems a bit excessive. Most rocks melt at around 1,200k but rocks don't really boil, I suspect the key point is the atmospheric pressure, which is over 11,000,000 atmospheres, and just like water, the temperature at which rock turns to a gaseous state increases with pressure. I suspect the figures are off somewhere, but with over 12,000,000 atmospheres the calculation is probably correct, the rock would likely remain in a solid state, but the figures the calculations are based or are probably dodgy.

I wouldn't trust the numbers completely though, the Stellar Forge has been known to throw a few dodgy numbers around, but there are known hot exoplanets. KELT-9b orbiting an A class star is over 4600K, well over half the temperature of the suns surface and hotter than many smaller stars, so if it was orbiting an L type dwarf it would be hotter than its star, in fact hotter than M's and also many K's, but then it gets it heat from the fact the A class has a surface temp of 10,000k so if it was orbiting a colder star the planet wouldn't be as hot, still it would be interesting trying to land on a really hot planet!
The core of Jupiter should be running at a balmy 24,000 degrees C, pressure in the ballpark of 100,000,000 atm. For comparison, pressure at Earth's core is only just below 4,000,000 atm. So trying to land on a planet like that would be somewhat similar to land on a gas giant core. Actually, planets like that make me think they are really "failed" gas giants...

:D S

EDIT: And no, I don't think we should be able to land somewhere like that or get much out of trying. Maybe a role for very specialised ships somewhere down the road?

EDIT2: I really should pick up The Core on Bluray. Fantastic movie.
 
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