General / Off-Topic So... Do we have free will? :)

I see, I see. This is the intellectual thread on the subject, so we get the heavy stuff here. While over in the 'other' tread, they get wikipedia.
I just spilled my drink.. thank you Arry..... I'll send the bill by email?
 
I suppose that depends on one's interpretation of "free will".

There seems some implication in us humans that it means limitless possibilities and modes of action... I tend to think that nothing is limitless; including the universe we live in.

I think "free will" has to be in some type of contextualised, ethical mind space.

Example: One may have free will to commit murder but is that a good thing? If the society catches you will you suffer because you have brought suffering on others? Doesn't sound like a fun way of having free will to me.........
.......... is what I just put in the other thread about "free will".
 
I see: We use the mass of our own Sun, as a base line to work out the mass of other objects in space. We learn new things every day. Thanks.

So how did they work out the mass of something like a black hole? I mean, technically we can't see them, only imagine how big they are etc.. Yes I know that they used multiple telescopes to get that image about a month ago, but that was 'generated'.

Err... Maybe we should start this up in the Astronomy threads.
In the case of Sag A* they measured the velocity of the orbiting 'S-Stars' to calculate the gravity and thus work out the mass.
The orbits are shown in this video;

 
In the case of Sag A* they measured the velocity of the orbiting 'S-Stars' to calculate the gravity and thus work out the mass.
The orbits are shown in this video;

A somewhat heretic follow-up question would be how they can be so sure as all current physics don't seem to work anymore when it comes to calculating the outer regions of spiral galaxies (the're moving faster than they should in relation to the inner regions), which in the end led to such exotic auxiliary constructions like dark matter and dark energy.
 
A somewhat heretic follow-up question would be how they can be so sure as all current physics don't seem to work anymore when it comes to calculating the outer regions of spiral galaxies (the're moving faster than they should in relation to the inner regions), which in the end led to such exotic auxiliary constructions like dark matter and dark energy.
Hm, i might have something that would react similarly. Give me half an hour i'll make a video of it quickly.
 
Dark Matter would be the extra mass required to explain the orbital velocities of the outer stars.
Dark Energy is the acceleration of galaxies (outside our supergroup) away from us.
The two items aren't connected in any manner I'm aware of.
It's the word "dark" that have people confused.
They should be named differently.

Dark matter should be named something like "Non-reactive matter", because it doesn't interact with normal matter in any other way but gravity itself.
Dark energy should be called "Negative pressure" or "Energy density of empty space".
But that would suggest scientists have an idea what's going on, so... "dark" it is. :LOL:
 
It's the word "dark" that have people confused.
They should be named differently.

Dark matter should be named something like "Non-reactive matter", because it doesn't interact with normal matter in any other way but gravity itself.
Dark energy should be called "Negative pressure" or "Energy density of empty space".
But that would suggest scientists have an idea what's going on, so... "dark" it is. :LOL:
Best explanation EVER! Seriously
 
Ok, let me TRY and explain what this video is. And it's just a visualisation of an effect that occurs, which, if you think logically, should not happen like that.

Imagine a couple of kids on a Merry-go-round. I'm sure everyone knows what happens when it starts to spin too fast, right?

The same SHOULD happen in the video. Shouldn't it? :unsure:


What happens, is just the opposite, BUT it depends on the mass as well, anything that passes a certain mass-threshold is caught in the center, everything else either stays "in-orbit" or is influenced by tidal forces (that's just bc of the size of the pot and bc the stir wasn't perfect.) :sneaky:
I'll just leave it at that. Maybe someone else can explain better than me, am inbetween things so it's a bit rushed. :)

Just for input and consideration.




Edit: forgot the most important bit, look at how the outer and inner particles (the galaxy pepper, lol) move "at different" speed, seemingly, but they travel exactly the same distance.
 
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Here's a quick and rushed out link before I vanish into the bath tube:
The mystery of the milky ways
This article, after reading it more thoroughly now, showed that in one point I was wrong:
The entire galaxy rotates, with objects closer to the center rotating faster, and those further from the center rotating more slowly. The curve of this differential rotation shows irregularities that cannot be explained by visible mass alone.
But I was still right (according to this article), that it's believed that these irregularities could be explained by dark matter:
Here, it is likely that invisible dark matter plays a role. And the astronomers face yet another problem: despite the rotation, the spiral arms do not unwind, but have maintained their shape for billions of years. One explanation for this is shockwaves that propagate throughout the whole system and compact the matter in the spiral arms like a traffic jam on the motorway. Researchers are still puzzling over what causes these density waves.
 
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@picommander did you watch the video i made? You can see the effect there.

The reason for the outer mass moving slower is the gravitational- vs. orbital pull. They move at the same speed, but the orbit is larger, resulting in the differentiation.
 
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