Something Positive for Elite / Frontier Staff Who Are Human Beings w Feelings Not Targets

And yet, it is true. If it was rng we would not be able to encounter the same things in the same spots every time. That is why the procedural generation in ED is fundamentally deterministic and not random.

In the case of the Stellar Forge it is even more true due to the fact that the star systems distribution and composition in it is not just based on an rng seed alone but based on actual galaxy disc matter density maps as currently known for the milky way. This in turn leads to very specific types of stars, systems composition, number of bodies, masses, temperatures and chemistry (and therefore colour) in them depending on where you are in the galaxy. If you actually watch the video I linked above you can learn about it, in particular min 13:05. It may very well have some random elements aswell but just to add flavour and fluff to the very deterministic core of the proc gen of the star systems based on actual galaxy data.



Not really, there is a very specific scientific base for how and where the systems are generated in the Elite galaxy, as per above. Not random or imaginary at all.



As shown above the stellar forge is not just a random algorithm. Not only it had to be designed to conform to known galaxy matter density distribution maps and produce logical results accordingly, but also it had to accomodate rationally all the actual existing celestial objetcs catalogued to date in it. The forge is so detailed that has managed to replicate reasonably well a certain number of recent real life discoveries like Trappist 1 or match certain theories like the ones related to the number of brown dwarves in the galaxy etc.

It is not a perfect system, but it is many orders of magnitude deeper and sophisticated than your "just a random based algorithm". Affording credit to it on the basis of scale alone (especially when you factor in all the actual real celestial catalogued items integrated to the system) is completely justified.
ED builds on the accomplishments of the original with the proc gen. It uses algo that generate stuff with a seed. Is used to compress data by avoiding to store billions of star system data. Instead you call algo and have generate the current place you're in with a fixed seed.
Proc gen often uses fixed assets to pair instead of total RNG, Warframes map tiles are crafted so they can fit together in multiple ways and generate different maps each times - but they all still play similarly.

Now why is important to have billions of star systems to visit I can't say - methinks a limited number would be better. If only for compressing content and make it findable for mortals.
 
Can't say a video game ever changed my life but I do find it very much a "first world problem" that people complain about bugs in a game yet still play.
Many of us can, because Elite influenced us so much in our childhood that it determined our professional paths... That's one of the big reasons why many of us here are so passionate about it.
 
Many of us can, because Elite influenced us so much in our childhood that it determined our professional paths... That's one of the big reasons why many of us here are so passionate about it.
I have a knack for elegant solutions. Always liked jommetry and the proofs stuff. Same with "how do you cram a galaxy into 48KB of memory"?
 
I fully understand what you are referring to but also fully disagree with your oversimplification and that it should not deserve credit.

You seemed to have fundamentally misunderstood the deterministic nature of the Stellar Forge and its deep core roots in the modelling of actual cosmological data of the galaxy to produce results that are very far from a rng.

Not your fault, often times deterministic proc gen is confused with rng and wrongly assumed as trivial.
I think I'm following what you're saying, but I still don't understand how this results in patches coming so slowly. Do they have to propagate across the galaxy before they function or something?

Ah the plight of a software developer. If you are good, you make it look easy so everyone thinks you are not any good at all.
Or you constantly get compared to the masters of programming, with the critics forgetting that not everyone has the same level of skill. It's like that guy from the first Iron Man movie that Obadiah Stane yelled at:


Yeah, he can't build a miniaturized arc reactor, but he's not Tony Stark.
 

Viajero

Volunteer Moderator
I think I'm following what you're saying, but I still don't understand how this results in patches coming so slowly. Do they have to propagate across the galaxy before they function or something?
Lol, do not think I was responding to you at all I am afraid! For your opinion about patches I suspect your question is best addressed at FDEV.
 
I think I'm following what you're saying, but I still don't understand how this results in patches coming so slowly. Do they have to propagate across the galaxy before they function or something?


Or you constantly get compared to the masters of programming, with the critics forgetting that not everyone has the same level of skill. It's like that guy from the first Iron Man movie that Obadiah Stane yelled at:


Yeah, he can't build a miniaturized arc reactor, but he's not Tony Stark.
There is that, too.
 
Ah the plight of a software developer. If you are good, you make it look easy so everyone thinks you are not any good at all.
Is rng 'bad'. There is evidently randomness in the algorithm - for example signal sources. They generate as determined by probability. So we literally know just from that alone rng is a part of the procedure. I said already I don't know how much is stochastic and how much is deterministic but there is DEMONSTRABLY both going on.

Why is this proving so difficult to understand?
 
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