Special mission from the Galactic Mapping Project

Incoming Transmission....

Greetings Commander. The Galactic Mapping Project has put out a request for help on two special missions!

Mission 1: The Real Life Nebula

The GMP database is currently missing entries for a number of important real-life planetary nebula. We need explorers to visit these locations, write up detailed descriptions of what they find, and submit high-quality photographs. Are you able to help us?

The list objects, along with the reference systems:

IC 4191 (GCRV 7815)
NGC 6445 (CSI-20-17462)
Mission 2: No Data Found

The GMP also contains points of interest logged by early explorers... but the details were lost in transmission, or have sadly been lost over time. We know these locations are interesting, but we don't know why! We need explorers to visit the locations, write up a description of why they're interesting, and submit some photographs. Can you help?

List of locations with "lost data":

MISSION COMPLETE. Much thanks to Commander Zenith!


All submissions should follow the standard format which is found in this thread. Thank you!
 
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Shucks: I passed a couple of those a couple days ago, out on my way to the core. I'll see if I can swing by at least a couple of those near the Road to Colonia on my return trip*, assuming those haven't been taken care of by the time I reach them.

*Carrying a couple tourists in my shiny new Anaconda. Puts a softish timer on my voyage, and I'm honestly kind of eager to get back in the saddle of anything that isn't an Anaconda.
 
I'm on my way to NGC 6188 currently, arriving probably tonight or over the weekend, since I haven't visited the asteroid base there yet. The problem is, I can't really take high res screenshots, since I'm doing everything in VR. Doh! :D
 
I'm on my way to NGC 6188 currently, arriving probably tonight or over the weekend, since I haven't visited the asteroid base there yet. The problem is, I can't really take high res screenshots, since I'm doing everything in VR. Doh! :D
OK, I've arrived. I took a few screenshots from outside the nebula. Is there anything else needed? A small blurb about it, a few sentences maybe? I looked at Cat's Paw as an example on EDSM and it was pretty short.
 
OK, I've arrived. I took a few screenshots from outside the nebula. Is there anything else needed? A small blurb about it, a few sentences maybe? I looked at Cat's Paw as an example on EDSM and it was pretty short.
Here's an example of a quality description of a nebula, the Butterfly Nebula:


The Butterfly Nebula (NGC 2346) is a planetary nebula near the celestial equator of the constellation Monoceros that was first observed by William Hershel in 1795. The nebula's distinct 'double bubble' shape is the result of a very rapid, 30 day orbital period between a blue-white A5 star and the M5 red dwarf remnant of the star that shed its outer layers to form the nebular gas cloud. There is a significant amount of turbulence within the gas cloud that has periodically caused significant changes in the stars' apparent magnitude, such when the system swung between the 11th and 15th magnitude every two weeks for a period of 4 years at the end of the 20th Century.

There are no planetary bodies in the system.
 
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I added the following systems as waypoints to my expedition Xpedition:

Slegou Black Hole (Slegou AA-A h37)
NGC 7538 Nebula (NGC 7538 Sector PD-S b4-1)
IC 5217 (CSI+50-22218)

I'll check them out when I am there and take some HighRes images.


Fly/land safe.


Cmdr Steyla
 
I am now at Slegou AA-A h37. I don't see anything special. Just a Black Hole and an Ice Body.

Unless the data of one of the bodies is special.

Here are some images :










I'll be in that system till 31.07. 1800h UTC

Let me know if you need anything else from there.





Fly/land safe.

Cmdr Steyla
 
Hello! I'm sitting in IC 3634's reference star (I had no idea Wolf-Rayets looked so amazing). It's been previously discovered by Allitnil. I don't know a huge deal about the nebula, so I'm not sure I can fully fill in the description, but I can at least do my best to describe what it looked like to an astronomical novitiate.

Also, the nebula name may be incorrect; according to my Google-fu, IC 3634 is a galaxy, not a nebula. BD-21 4483, however is associated with IC 4634, so that's what I'll refer to it as.

POI Name: IC 4634
POI Type: Planetary Nebula
GalMap Reference: BD-21 4483
Description: A planetary nebula discovered in the 19'th century, the IC 4634 nebula is centered around a Wolf-Rayet N star casting a brilliant purple hue across its three planets, two Class V gas giants (one ringed), and an outer, metal-rich world with two high-metal-content rings. Located towards the top of the galactic plane, it may be challenging to reach for ships with short jump ranges. While its position would ordinarily lead to excellent views of the galactic disk, the thick, green planetary nebula surrounding the star prevents such observation.

Screenshots
BD-21 4483


Further distance, with the green nebula in background


Planet 1:


Planet 2:


Planet 3:


System image:
 
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Unless someone has already claimed them, I can do a quick cleanup run on the nebulae north of the Bubble:

NGC 6852 Nebula (IRAS 19581+0135)
NGC 6842 (CSI+29-19529)
NGC 6629 (CD-23 14350)
NGC 6565 (CD-28 14266)
NGC 6326 (CD-51 10820)
NGC 5882 (CD-45 9789)
NGC 5307 (CD-50 8073)
NGC 6337 Nebula (Hen 2-215)
NGC 6563 (CD-33 12935)

I might re-order it slightly, but that is my rough route.
 
Hello! I'm sitting in IC 3634's reference star (I had no idea Wolf-Rayets looked so amazing). It's been previously discovered by Allitnil. I don't know a huge deal about the nebula, so I'm not sure I can fully fill in the description, but I can at least do my best to describe what it looked like to an astronomical novitiate.
Wonderful, thank you!

The original post has been updated, removing items that have been explored. Thanks to everyone so far. Still many to do!
 
The Mission 2 POIs were submitted by me back in the day by trilateration.

They're all part of the XTE/GRS series of systems.
XTE = Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer [wiki link]
GRS= Gamma Ray Sources

They're all black hole or neutron star binary systems. The black holes in these systems are much larger than the usual stellar mass black holes.
eg. XTE J1748-288

SystemXZYNotesVisitorDate
V1033 Scorpii2071.0625342.81257719.625Prev disc by PulonochnikAvaddon05/05/2015
PSR J1709-44292272.21875-366.6257477.78125No prev disc!Avaddon05/05/2015
XTE J1818-245-2584.25-1462.12519778.34375
XTE J1748-288-306.59375-100.812525997.96875Prev disc by BendmeZenith Ddraiglas26/04/2015
XTE J1752-223-1900.5627.12516881.78125
GHJ2008 310258.15625-1554.2523840.15625
V821 Arae9675-2036.8437525124.5625
GRS 1758-258-1257.1875-380.062515946

This is my worksheet where I was tracking the info.
You can see which ones I've visited or got someone else to visit for me.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ZQ9zO-HgMWcH1z9Cjl_JooxNq_WK-cscA72ijs7Ry7c/edit?usp=sharing

I'm going to be swinging by some of these in the next couple of weeks.
 
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