The First Great Planetary Expedition

Nice infograph. Steps 1 - 3 check, Steps 4 and 5 not so much. Taking FA off helped gain some speed but trying to make useful landings/bounces is the tough part. Still taking too much damage and the more speed the more damage. At this rate i will only about 3K of mats for the trip. only can carry 300 of course. Only been practicing for a couple hundred k so I should improve with more practice.

Anyways your infograph has helped and my crappy Flying skills have improved a bit with your aid.

Good Job
Caliber
 
Nice infograph. Steps 1 - 3 check, Steps 4 and 5 not so much. Taking FA off helped gain some speed but trying to make useful landings/bounces is the tough part. Still taking too much damage and the more speed the more damage. At this rate i will only about 3K of mats for the trip. only can carry 300 of course. Only been practicing for a couple hundred k so I should improve with more practice.

Anyways your infograph has helped and my crappy Flying skills have improved a bit with your aid.

Good Job
Caliber
Same here (FA off makes all SRV driving a better experience) and I wonder if that isn't just the price that has to be paid.

It looks to me like Alec uses VR - does this make flyving easier when moving along at ~40° off horizontal, or just easier but not essential? Staring at the ground while trying to read the inclinometer on the HUD just gets tedious after a time.
 
Same here (FA off makes all SRV driving a better experience) and I wonder if that isn't just the price that has to be paid.

It looks to me like Alec uses VR - does this make flyving easier when moving along at ~40° off horizontal, or just easier but not essential? Staring at the ground while trying to read the inclinometer on the HUD just gets tedious after a time.
Actually, although I have VR I tend to play on-screen for SRV driving ... but I do use TrackIR ... being up to look up while the SRV is tilted down is almost invaluable. I wonder if Sushi has head tracking too? Easy to take that for granted - I guess "flyving" must be quite hard when you're forced to look at the ground with no idea where you're going?
 
Same here (FA off makes all SRV driving a better experience) and I wonder if that isn't just the price that has to be paid.

It looks to me like Alec uses VR - does this make flyving easier when moving along at ~40° off horizontal, or just easier but not essential? Staring at the ground while trying to read the inclinometer on the HUD just gets tedious after a time.
Can you please clarify exactly what's been challenging? Not being able to see where you're going is part of it, is there more? The post you referenced was talking about having trouble landing good bounces. What are you running into? (Figuratively?)


Actually, although I have VR I tend to play on-screen for SRV driving ... but I do use TrackIR ... being up to look up while the SRV is tilted down is almost invaluable. I wonder if Sushi has head tracking too? Easy to take that for granted - I guess "flyving" must be quite hard when you're forced to look at the ground with no idea where you're going?
I don't have any sort of head tracking. I have buttons and a mouse I can use for headlook but I rarely bother most of the time, I just tilt back up enough to see well before landing, or in between long boosts (if I'm on a really big bounce).
 
Can you please clarify exactly what's been challenging? Not being able to see where you're going is part of it, is there more? The post you referenced was talking about having trouble landing good bounces. What are you running into? (Figuratively?)
That was my post he referenced. On flat ground it isn't as much an issue. Flyving makes a bigger difference on uneven ground and it also increases the challenges. Again it improves with more practice but hit that landing wrong and your in the maytag washer - spin cycle. Not everyone is an Ace pilot or an Ace SRV driver. My combat skills are mediocre and I expect that to be the case with SRV. Keeping oriented as you land/bounce is critical to increasing speeds and not taking damage.

I used to train people how to run heavy equipment, Large dozers, haulage trucks, back hoes and the like. I used to tell them that everything is easy - once you know how- it is getting to the once you know how and some memory muscle and coordination that is the hard part. Some people just picked it up so quick while others would struggle with the simplest tasks.

This event is going to have drivers of all skill ranges and we should be able to make it fun for all. One solution is longer routes for faster drivers. Events at some POI's that enable drivers to catch up. Difficult routes and easy routes. Lastly it isn't a race and just finishing it can be a proud accomplishment. How many runners enter a major marathon with no hope of placing in the top half but just crossing the finish line is victory enuff for them. That is where I am. I want to complete this circumnavagation and have fun in the process. I think that is doable.

Caliber
 

Ian Phillips

Volunteer Moderator
I must be a bad boy - I read this:
"This event is going to have drivers of all skill ranges and we should be able to make fun of them all."
 
Exactly as Caliber outlines above. I understand the theory and am getting better at it, but still prefer to keep eight wheels on the ground and plan ahead accordingly. There's also a lifetime of conditioning to overcome: Look after your kit and your kit will look after you. Even a simulated Demolition Derby takes some getting used to.
 
That was my post he referenced. On flat ground it isn't as much an issue. Flyving makes a bigger difference on uneven ground and it also increases the challenges. Again it improves with more practice but hit that landing wrong and your in the maytag washer - spin cycle. Not everyone is an Ace pilot or an Ace SRV driver. My combat skills are mediocre and I expect that to be the case with SRV. Keeping oriented as you land/bounce is critical to increasing speeds and not taking damage.

I used to train people how to run heavy equipment, Large dozers, haulage trucks, back hoes and the like. I used to tell them that everything is easy - once you know how- it is getting to the once you know how and some memory muscle and coordination that is the hard part. Some people just picked it up so quick while others would struggle with the simplest tasks.

This event is going to have drivers of all skill ranges and we should be able to make it fun for all. One solution is longer routes for faster drivers. Events at some POI's that enable drivers to catch up. Difficult routes and easy routes. Lastly it isn't a race and just finishing it can be a proud accomplishment. How many runners enter a major marathon with no hope of placing in the top half but just crossing the finish line is victory enuff for them. That is where I am. I want to complete this circumnavagation and have fun in the process. I think that is doable.

Caliber
Very well said (again) sir - you have a knack of putting my best intentions for this event into very good words! And yes, there's a big difference between understanding the theory behind SRV "flyving" and actually being able to do it. If it's any consolation I too used to look at what people like Sushi were doing in the SRV and just think ... how - the hell - do you do that???
o7
 
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