The Quest To Find Raxxla

My suspicion of the choice of the word 'fernweh' is that it's a word that in 36+years I've never heard before nor read in any books. Yet in definition it's an older language word( unless it's regularly used in germany, which I suspect it isn't).

Why would a game set so far in the future use such an uncommon word that isn't even necessarily relevant today?
 
It was familiar to me already (depends on what music/literature etc. you are into I guess) but it stood out as a bit deliberate, a bit like Prester John in the companty of Atlantis and El Dorado.. but again Prester is familiar to some..
 
My suspicion of the choice of the word 'fernweh' is that it's a word that in 36+years I've never heard before nor read in any books. Yet in definition it's an older language word( unless it's regularly used in germany, which I suspect it isn't).

Why would a game set so far in the future use such an uncommon word that isn't even necessarily relevant today?
Why shouldn’t it?

Various points:

- the word may come into usage

- the word might just be a very good description for what it is

- someone might just be a fan of how different languages have words for things which English doesn’t necessarily have a word for

- someone might be a fan of historical/old language

Not sure where you’re based but if you’re in the UK, you may remember a thing from a few years back where a politician said that people had forgotten the meaning of Habeas Corpus.

How long has Latin been a dead language for?

As another point, is there any reason why the game shouldn’t introduce people to new things (whether words, ideas, concepts, etc)?



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My suspicion of the choice of the word 'fernweh' is that it's a word that in 36+years I've never heard before nor read in any books. Yet in definition it's an older language word( unless it's regularly used in germany, which I suspect it isn't).

Why would a game set so far in the future use such an uncommon word that isn't even necessarily relevant today?
Fernweh is regularly used in German, its first usage was in 1835. Some consider it a synonym for wanderlust, and some say that wanderlust is lust to wander on foot in nature and that Fernweh is lust for travel to distant lands.
 
Some Romanes. But in my view, the appropriate response to those people is Romanes Eunt Domus. 😉
Well Hebrew doesn't have noun cases and I can relate to his troubles with Roman cases, since my first language doesn't have articles. ;)

Back to Latin: technically it is dead, since it isn't the native language of any community, but it is still actively used. In my home country it was one of the official languages until the middle of the 19th century.
 
Well Hebrew doesn't have noun cases and I can relate to his troubles with Roman cases, since my first language doesn't have articles. ;)

Back to Latin: technically it is dead, since it isn't the native language of any community, but it is still actively used. In my home country it was one of the official languages until the middle of the 19th century.
Very well played with respect to that reference! 😀

But yes, the Latin use is really the point - although nominally a dead language (I should have probably have said ‘dead’ rather than dead. 🙂 ), it is still in use to varying degrees. It’s very concievable that as similar principle will apply in the future, whether for Latin or other languages.
 
Has anyone considered the lore implications for The Pilots Federation and/or Universal Cartographics including clues in codex articles about the means to find Raxxla? I see a few different scenarios for this:

1. It was done willfully, which means that one or both organizations (or the Club behind one or both of them) already know how to find it, and for some reason want independent pilots to also find it.
2. A member or small group of one of these organizations found a way to slip some clues into the wording of some articles without rousing suspicion? Again, not sure what the motivation would be.
3. There are no intentional clues, but simply including the collection of rumors surrounding Raxxla may still point us in the right direction.

I'm personally not expecting anything to be decoded or otherwise directly hidden within the articles themselves. But, some of the word choices and references (i.e. Prester John) do make me think that there's something there.
 
Has anyone considered the lore implications for The Pilots Federation and/or Universal Cartographics including clues in codex articles about the means to find Raxxla? I see a few different scenarios for this:

1. It was done willfully, which means that one or both organizations (or the Club behind one or both of them) already know how to find it, and for some reason want independent pilots to also find it.
2. A member or small group of one of these organizations found a way to slip some clues into the wording of some articles without rousing suspicion? Again, not sure what the motivation would be.
3. There are no intentional clues, but simply including the collection of rumors surrounding Raxxla may still point us in the right direction.

I'm personally not expecting anything to be decoded or otherwise directly hidden within the articles themselves. But, some of the word choices and references (i.e. Prester John) do make me think that there's something there.
Trying to figure that one out is probably harder than finding Raxxla :)
My rule of thumb is if it's a quote or a reference (eg the stuff about Asphodel) then it's potentially a clue. Otherwise it's just wrapper. For me, 'fernweh' falls into this category.

Either way, I don't think the Codex entry is the first in a trail of breadcrumbs leading to an abandoned megaship. Oh, wrong mystery again ;)
 
Trying to figure that one out is probably harder than finding Raxxla :)
My rule of thumb is if it's a quote or a reference (eg the stuff about Asphodel) then it's potentially a clue. Otherwise it's just wrapper. For me, 'fernweh' falls into this category.

Either way, I don't think the Codex entry is the first in a trail of breadcrumbs leading to an abandoned megaship. Oh, wrong mystery again ;)
It may not be. As DB said “you don’t know WHAT Raxxla is!”
 
Well Hebrew doesn't have noun cases and I can relate to his troubles with Roman cases, since my first language doesn't have articles. ;)

Back to Latin: technically it is dead, since it isn't the native language of any community, but it is still actively used. In my home country it was one of the official languages until the middle of the 19th century.
[pedantry on]

Pedantic point of order!

Isn’t Latin the official language of the Vatican? Which I believe is technically a country in its own right?
:cool:

[pedantry off]
 
It may not be. As DB said “you don’t know WHAT Raxxla is!”
I saw this what it is statement myself and have wondered if it's real or not. In the version I saw, it was stated that when DB was asked if Raxxla was in the game, he said something like "That's a silly question, of course it is.........you just don't know what it is".

The author stated however, it was unclear if the WHAT Sentance was a continuation of Raxxla, or in relation to the following question.

If it was in relation to Raxxla, then that would strongly imply its not a moon/planet. So what else could it be?

A star
A black hole
A white hole
A generation ship
A different kind of ship
An astroid

Am I missing anything?
 
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