General / Off-Topic The safest place

"I think it came during Mardi Gras, given the timing of it. Someone brought it here and then it starts spreading slowly," Dr. Joshua Denson, a pulmonary and critical care physician at Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans, told NBC News.

"I diagnosed the second case, the first critically ill patient, here last weekend," he said. "Her timing was about two weeks post-Mardi Gras."
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The exact same thing took place with our Carnival, IMHO. But our official pattern is shaped by the cruise ship 68 twits that ignored the obvious threat and got infected back in early March.

Lousiana has the fastest rate of infection in the world according to reports, but the most lethal cluster is still the one in Washington. So New Orleans is the place to send the next batch of ventillators, if the story is correct. Bad news for here, same Carnival story.

Guys, if you would, stick your flag up in your posts to help us identify local info?
It's a nice little way to show solidarity too.
 
Supposedly, I am not working, right? Sure not getting paid.

Got called out at near midnight to do an emergency operation. Child with a wound. Seriously, nurse on the phone says I'm rostered. W T F ?
That means, no other doctor, that is what that means. Public system is probably jammed with feverish people all sure they have coronavirus.

Because today our first case died. So ■□●□ just got real for the public.

Centre had just ONE surgical mask left. No sterile tools because they are out of autoclave packet material. No Hibitane to clean the wound or scrub.

Made up some old fashioned packs with surgical towels and masking tape to sterilize tomorrow. Made a cleaning solution out of detergent, sterile saline and iodine drops.

Knocked him out with a sublingual sedative.

Fixed the wound with just one needle and cut the lines with the flat edge of another. I really thought this stuff was going to be in my past when I joined a private centre in an upscale area. New Times for sure...

Tomorrow, I am going to try to build a reusable personal respirator device. We are going to need it.
You are old school, adapt and overcome, don’t know your area however if you got some vets nearby maybe they got some usable equipment you can use?
 
I just watched the White House press briefing. It seemed to me that rational, logical decisions are being made regarding the virus and its intersect with the economy. The passage of a staggering 2 trillion dollar stimulus package (with 4 more trillion on standby) with bi-partisan support in just a matter of days is absolutely unprecedented. Looks like the leadership is razor sharp to me. That package is really going to help a lot of people and businesses.

Reading between the lines I wouldn't be surprised if what we see are modified quarantine/lockdowns, but it's unlikely to see a rock hard national level "everybody stay in their house" that gets crammed down on the population. I approve this message.
I like free choices, but I ain’t welcoming no one until I’m sure this is over.
If not we will need to check people arriving for symptoms.

or get a hazmat suit 🤠

 
I don't want to go down this rabbit hole, but its odd how few people who have spent the last five years telling anyone that open borders is the way to go, and if you don't agree or work to police them, then you're a damn facist, have been suspiciously quiet since this all began.

Despite this being one of the very things people with a more harsh outlook on border-control have been warning folk about.
Its not about open borders, its about people who are resident legally who work for the NHS already and keep it going. The UK always had the power to police borders, just decided not to use it 'for reasons'- I wonder what they'd be?
 
It's not so much the 'disposing bodies' as much as 'removing from normal life' that is the issue. For example:


Now, we only hear about this individual because he is pretty influential so news worthy. But people notice when a friend disappears, and will spread the news. If 21 million (?) people disappear this news spreads like wildfire.

Something to consider: if you think 'communist ' China has the same level social security net as we have in Western Europe, think again. I am pretty sure Chinese-style lockdowns financially ruined endless numbers of Chinese citizens, and CCP is not the kind of government that cares much about such 'details' when it acts.

I anticipate a fair number will be kicked of their subscriptions in the US in total as well, three months from now. My estimate is half the effect (0.5*1.3%=+-2 million accounts) due to US relative wealth compared with China.
FWIW from Wikipedia

In pre-1980s reform China, the socialist state fulfilled the needs of society from cradle to grave. Child care, education, job placement, housing, subsistence, health care, and elder care were largely the responsibility of the work unit as administered through state-owned enterprises and agricultural communes and collectives. As those systems disappeared or were reformed, the "iron rice bowl" approach to welfare changed. Article 14 of the constitution stipulates that the state "builds and improves a welfare system that corresponds with the level of economic development.
In 2004 China experienced the greatest decrease in its poorest population since 1999. People with a per capita income of less than 668 renminbi (RMB; US$80.71) decreased 2.9 million or 10 percent; those with a per capita income of no more than 924 RMB (US$111.64) decreased by 6.4 million or 11.4 percent, according to statistics from the State Council’s Poverty Reduction Office.
Welfare reforms since the late 1990s have included unemployment insurance, medical insurance, workers’ compensation insurance, maternity benefits, communal pension funds, individual pension accounts, universal health care,[3] and a carbon tax.[4]
A law approved February 2013 will mandate a nationwide minimum wage at 40% average urban salaries to be phased in fully by 2015.[5]
China introduced the one-child policy decades ago, and this has helped reduce the strain on the government resources and economy. At present, the rules are modified and people can have more than one child, provided they pay a fee[citation needed]. This fee goes into funding necessary infrastructure or anything else the government deems fit.
 
Darn (<- tone self moderated) straight.
Nobody in.
Nobody out.

Stay safe and do NOT get this thing. When it goes bad it is sudden, and if you can't get on the machines It. Is. Game. Over.
We’re not in panic-mode however I’ve seen how fast this thing can develop, remember I was in India only a few weeks back, 2 cases now they are in panicmode.

we know none of us here got it, so it can only come from the outside, we don’t need food, water or anything for that matter, so we can sit and wait for a long time, I placed a cheap hand radio at the gate with a big sign, don’t enter unless approved, use the radio 😁 well call me crazy but I don’t want my family to get sick.
 
FWIW from Wikipedia

In pre-1980s reform China, the socialist state fulfilled the needs of society from cradle to grave. Child care, education, job placement, housing, subsistence, health care, and elder care were largely the responsibility of the work unit as administered through state-owned enterprises and agricultural communes and collectives. As those systems disappeared or were reformed, the "iron rice bowl" approach to welfare changed. Article 14 of the constitution stipulates that the state "builds and improves a welfare system that corresponds with the level of economic development.
In 2004 China experienced the greatest decrease in its poorest population since 1999. People with a per capita income of less than 668 renminbi (RMB; US$80.71) decreased 2.9 million or 10 percent; those with a per capita income of no more than 924 RMB (US$111.64) decreased by 6.4 million or 11.4 percent, according to statistics from the State Council’s Poverty Reduction Office.
Welfare reforms since the late 1990s have included unemployment insurance, medical insurance, workers’ compensation insurance, maternity benefits, communal pension funds, individual pension accounts, universal health care,[3] and a carbon tax.[4]
A law approved February 2013 will mandate a nationwide minimum wage at 40% average urban salaries to be phased in fully by 2015.[5]
China introduced the one-child policy decades ago, and this has helped reduce the strain on the government resources and economy. At present, the rules are modified and people can have more than one child, provided they pay a fee[citation needed]. This fee goes into funding necessary infrastructure or anything else the government deems fit.
I am not denying they have a social net, and their inclusion of full medical insurance cover for the unemployed is great, but it is still not on par with true first world countries. For example, unemployment benefits in Beijing are slightly under $200. Not enough for 'luxuries' like cellphone plans.
 
5 from Spain (3414 deaths)

Although they were older people, they were in good health before being attacked by the virus.
:

- Lorenzo Sanz (76 years old), businessman and former president of Real Madrid (football)

- Lucía Bosé (89 years old), actress

- José Folgado (75 years old), businessman and former president of
Spanish Electricity Network.

- Carlos Falcó (83 years old),
Marquis of Griñón.

- Chema Candela (59 years old), RNE journalist.

- Francisco de Borja Domecq Solís (75 years old), rancher. He ran the Jandilla ranch from 1987 to 2016. (bull breeding for bullfighters)
The 2nd death in Portugal was the president of the portuguese branch of Santander bank.
 
I don't know about the specifics of the contention between Morbad and GJ51, but I'm more in line with GJ51's message of positivity and confidence that within a matter of weeks we'll see the worst of this behind us. I don't feel the need to nail it down to the exact week, but I believe that there is reason for hope.
What is/are the reasons why you feel that way? Are you guys getting good results from any measures taken, or it's just patriotist/optimism? Please mind that this is not a bait question, I'm not very informed about how things are going in the US or what measures are being taken, but by looking at just the numbers things seem to still be going to a grim direction, not otherwise.

I do know that the US has a huge industrial capacity that can be mobilized if necessary to produce needed equipment, but on the other hand it has no public health system, and without insurance, medical costs can run a family to bankrupcy fast. Are insurance companies paying for covid-19 treatments (usually medical insurances exclude epidemics/pandemics), or people have to pay from their own pockets?
 
And some very, very bad news.

Unlike other human coronaviruses COVID19 is unlikely to show seasonal patterns. In other words: it will likely not go away with an increase in temperature and/or humidity.

Seasonality: The four coronaviruses that are endemic in human populations are responsible for 10–15% of
common cold infections and display a marked winter seasonality in temperate climates, with a peak between
December and April, but are hardly detected in the summer months [61-64]. The seasonality of coronaviruses
might be driven, in part, by environmental conditions and host susceptibility, because coronaviruses are more
stable under low and midrange relative humidity (20–50%) when the defence mechanisms of the airways are
suppressed [65,66]. However, based on preliminary analyses of the COVID-19 outbreak in China and other
countries, high reproductive numbers were observed not only in dry and cold districts but also in tropical districts
with high absolute humidity, such as in Guangxi and Singapore [68]. There is no evidence to date that SARS-CoV-2
will display a marked winter seasonality, such as other human coronaviruses in the northern hemisphere, which
emphasises the importance of implementing intervention measures such as isolation of infected individuals,
workplace distancing, and school closures.
 
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And some very, very bad news.

Unlike other human coronaviruses COVID19 is unlikely to show seasonal patterns. In other words: it will likely not go away with an increase in temperature and/or humidity.
I had that hope too at first, back when the southern hemisphere was still virus free, that hotter weather would help turning the tide, or at least buy us time. But it turned out that the southern hemisphere simply has less tourism and the virus took longer to get there.
 
What is/are the reasons why you feel that way? Are you guys getting good results from any measures taken, or it's just patriotist/optimism? Please mind that this is not a bait question, I'm not very informed about how things are going in the US or what measures are being taken, but by looking at just the numbers things seem to still be going to a grim direction, not otherwise.

I do know that the US has a huge industrial capacity that can be mobilized if necessary to produce needed equipment, but on the other hand it has no public health system, and without insurance, medical costs can run a family to bankrupcy fast. Are insurance companies paying for covid-19 treatments (usually medical insurances exclude epidemics/pandemics), or people have to pay from their own pockets?
Expectations are pretty much divided based on in who you put more stock: medical experts or Trump. Those who listen to medical experts are very concerned for, among others, the reasons you mentioned. Many regions are barely enacting any measures (though on state level plenty other regions have shown decisive leadership!), access to healthcare is for tens of millions prohibitively expensive, millions don't have sick days and can't afford to stay away from work, supplies are dwindling and till this day many still don't grasp the seriousness due to prolonged denials by Trump and Fox that this is a very serious matter.

Those however who consider Trump to be a razor sharp leader with profound insight into these matters feel he is on top of it, and will fix it due to his great skills in things. There isn't any actual suggestion as to how this can be over in a few weeks without orders of magnitude more casualties compared with modern EU/Asian countries. Hope is based on the assumption there will be sudden new positive developments in treatment and industrial output. It is largely a faith-driven sentiment. I hope it will occur too but remain... doubtful.
 
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