UAs, Barnacles & More Thread 5 - The Canonn

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Awesome!

In which case this narrows tonight's search down to;

Titdally locked worlds with vapour geysers;

Maia A 7
Maia B 1 B A
Maia B 2 D
Maia B 3 A

Also the planet that is NOt tidally locked but DOES have Vapour geysers;

Maia B 2 C
I'll be looking around Maia A7 for a couple of days. I had a look around where I've landed for the night (-8,4455 by -96.3830) and in about 10 minutes found some Tungsten (rare) and Antimony (very rare) lying around.

Screenshot_0083.jpg

Doesn't look that misty here but I'll be moving around to other areas on the planet.
 
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Tomorrow morning: Michael reads this thread. Ask Development again. They take a look into the spawn table of the Barnacles Poi.

*uhh we have it game, but we forgot to active them..*
 
So the UA points at Merope's star. Has anyone pointed themselves at the star? Maybe there's a special audio cue that would tell us which body in the system to search.
 
I'm just anticipating that moment when I check back in on this thread and ten pages have been laid down in 10 minutes. At that point...i'll know.
 
Evening, CMDRs!

I've spent the last few days studying the conditions under which airless planets will develop the mist/fog that we'll sometimes see, and I believe I have a pretty good understanding of when and how it happens.

To summarize: Planets with significant rock content, when heated by sunlight, give off gas, which collects in craters, but can also form a thin layer over the surface in general. In the absence of solar heating, this gas disspates into space fairly quickly. You will find this gas on the day side of a given planet, but the night side will have usually cooled enough that the fog is gone.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, THIS MEANS YOU WILL GENERALLY NOT FIND FOG ON THE DARK SIDE OF A PLANET TIDALLY LOCKED TO ITS STAR.
If you're searching the dark sides of tidally locked planets because of the trailer footage alone, I'd suggest finding a new line of inquiry.

The Details:

I began my investigation in Merope. Here's a screenshot (which I already posted here before my results were conclusive) taken from above the day/night line on Merope 2D:


If you look at the horizon at the edge of the planet, on the right you can see a significant layer of beige-colored fog; on the left, as it darkens, this fog thins out and eventually disappears.

The main breakthrough, though, came entirely by accident, when I visited Shriver Landing (or whatever it's called) in the Ovid system:


That's both pitch black, AND super foggy. So what's going on here? Luckily, that moon is tidally locked to the Earth-like planet that it orbits, and its' orbital period is only 4.8 hours.

I decided to wait a while, and see how long the fog stuck around:


After thinking it over for a while, I've worked out what I think the day/night fog cycle is, on both this and other airless worlds.

DAY/NIGHT/FOG CYCLE

I. Sunrise. No/minimal fog present. Solar heating gradually causes fog to form during the "morning" of whatever part of the body you're on.
II. Eclipse (if a moon). This particular moon passes into its parent planet's shadow at the end of its "morning" period. This was when my "foggy" screenshot was taken - the beginning of the daily "eclipse" period. The Eclipse period starts out dark and foggy, but the fog dissipates a bit from the lack of sun.
III. Re-emergence. The sun comes back out from the other side of the parent body. Fog is present but diminished; heating begins again.
IV. Sunset. The angle of light gets low enough that the fog often dissipates well in advance of the "sunset line" (see my Merope 2D horizon shot above). After sunset, no fog is present.

Obviously, if a planet is not a moon, the Eclipse/Re-emergence phases won't occur.

In Conclusion:

You won't find fog on a tidally-locked night side of a planet. I suggest finding something new to search for.

These foggy areas are definitely where I'd expect to find a strange life form on a dead airless moon, but I don't have a clear enough picture here to help narrow down the search much (yet).

Happy Sciencing CMDRs!
Awesome!!! And incredible that this is actually that accurate in-game!
 
At Merope 5c - lots of nice deep and interesting ravines - just found a Bronzite Chondrite that gave me some iron and some nickel, probably old hat to everyone else - but a first for me :)
 
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Do we even know for sure at this point that a Barnacle POI is what we are looking for? I mean I know we all are assuming it, but do we know?
In fact they are in a cave, with the entrance somewhere on a planet/moon surface, and can't be found with wave scanner.
 
Evening, CMDRs!

I've spent the last few days studying the conditions under which airless planets will develop the mist/fog that we'll sometimes see, and I believe I have a pretty good understanding of when and how it happens.

To summarize: Planets with significant rock content, when heated by sunlight, give off gas, which collects in craters, but can also form a thin layer over the surface in general. In the absence of solar heating, this gas disspates into space fairly quickly. You will find this gas on the day side of a given planet, but the night side will have usually cooled enough that the fog is gone.

MOST IMPORTANTLY, THIS MEANS YOU WILL GENERALLY NOT FIND FOG ON THE DARK SIDE OF A PLANET TIDALLY LOCKED TO ITS STAR.
If you're searching the dark sides of tidally locked planets because of the trailer footage alone, I'd suggest finding a new line of inquiry.

The Details:

I began my investigation in Merope. Here's a screenshot (which I already posted here before my results were conclusive) taken from above the day/night line on Merope 2D:


If you look at the horizon at the edge of the planet, on the right you can see a significant layer of beige-colored fog; on the left, as it darkens, this fog thins out and eventually disappears.

The main breakthrough, though, came entirely by accident, when I visited Shriver Landing (or whatever it's called) in the Ovid system:


That's both pitch black, AND super foggy. So what's going on here? Luckily, that moon is tidally locked to the Earth-like planet that it orbits, and its' orbital period is only 4.8 hours.

I decided to wait a while, and see how long the fog stuck around:


After thinking it over for a while, I've worked out what I think the day/night fog cycle is, on both this and other airless worlds.

DAY/NIGHT/FOG CYCLE

I. Sunrise. No/minimal fog present. Solar heating gradually causes fog to form during the "morning" of whatever part of the body you're on.
II. Eclipse (if a moon). This particular moon passes into its parent planet's shadow at the end of its "morning" period. This was when my "foggy" screenshot was taken - the beginning of the daily "eclipse" period. The Eclipse period starts out dark and foggy, but the fog dissipates a bit from the lack of sun.
III. Re-emergence. The sun comes back out from the other side of the parent body. Fog is present but diminished; heating begins again.
IV. Sunset. The angle of light gets low enough that the fog often dissipates well in advance of the "sunset line" (see my Merope 2D horizon shot above). After sunset, no fog is present.

Obviously, if a planet is not a moon, the Eclipse/Re-emergence phases won't occur.

In Conclusion:

You won't find fog on a tidally-locked night side of a planet. I suggest finding something new to search for.

These foggy areas are definitely where I'd expect to find a strange life form on a dead airless moon, but I don't have a clear enough picture here to help narrow down the search much (yet).

Happy Sciencing CMDRs!

Epic! Superb work commander.O7
 
Well, I've spent a few hours yesterday, and the past 6 hours today searching randomly. Found a bunch of POIs and I probably won't need synthesis materials anytime soon but no barnacles. Checked out most of Merope including 3C and nothing. I aimed my searches toward the poles of the planet and mostly dark areas. Most mysterious thing I found was a broken nav beacon.
 
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Do we even know for sure at this point that a Barnacle POI is what we are looking for? I mean I know we all are assuming it, but do we know?
I know, but for sake of people 'immersion' I don't say how I know, because everyone wants to invest hundreds of hours into scouring planets looking, which is time I don't have.
 
@WizzyThing

Asking again, do you have any sort of offsite chat/voicechat?

Yes we have Teamspeak server

TeamSpeak:
Server canonn.typefrag.com:7090
Password gnosis
 
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