water magma == water ice geysers?

There seems to be a confusion (maybe for me only) between what the system map says about the geographical systems and what I actually find.

For example, I mapped a planet which said it had water magma volcanism, but what I found was (2 so far) water ice geysers.

Any information from more experience explorers?
 
There is a correlation between the type of volcanism present, the type of planet it is (rocky, icy, HMC, etc) and the types of geological features that are potentially findable. This thread lists many of the more common combinations, but I don't think it's a complete list.

From my reading of the list, if you're on a Water Magma world and finding "water ice geysers", then you must be on an Icy world, and your other possible options there are "water ice fumaroles" and "water gas vents".
 
There seems to be a confusion (maybe for me only) between what the system map says about the geographical systems and what I actually find.

For example, I mapped a planet which said it had water magma volcanism, but what I found was (2 so far) water ice geysers.

Any information from more experience explorers?
There has been a couple of threads about this.

magma
/ˈmaɡmə/
noun
noun: magma; plural noun: magmata; plural noun: magmas
  1. hot fluid or semi-fluid material below or within the earth's crust from which lava and other igneous rock is formed on cooling.
The key point here is that magma is a subsurface feature, on the Earth we have silicate magma below the crust, when the magma erupts we get lava spouts, not magma spouts. Water magma is the same. Water Magma denotes the type of vulcanism below the surface, not what you see on the surface, what you see on the surface as already mentioned will be water geysers, fumaroles, vents and other surface eruption features which is the magma expressing itself on the surface. You should never see a surface feature described as magma as that is the incorrect geological term for surface eruptions.
 
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The key point here is that magma is a subsurface feature, on the Earth we have silicate magma below the crust, when the magma erupts we get lava spouts, not magma spouts. Water magma is the same. Water Magma denotes the type of vulcanism below the surface, not what you see on the surface, what you see on the surface as already mentioned will be water geysers, fumaroles, vents and other surface eruption features which is the magma expressing itself on the surface. You should never see a surface feature described as magma as that is the incorrect geological term for surface eruptions.
Unfortunately, it seems that FD have indeed mixed up ther terminology and used "magma" instead of "lava". "Magma" appears on planets with "major volcanism" (which I believe is the journal teminology for it), but for "minor volcanism", we have the word "geysers" instead of "magma". And "geysers" are definitely surface features.
 
Unfortunately, it seems that FD have indeed mixed up ther terminology and used "magma" instead of "lava". "Magma" appears on planets with "major volcanism" (which I believe is the journal teminology for it), but for "minor volcanism", we have the word "geysers" instead of "magma". And "geysers" are definitely surface features.
No, lava is magma ones it's expelled to the surface, magma is subsurface vulcanism. Vulcanism often occurs on planets without a molton core and is usually caused by gravitational stress or heating by a stellar source and will usually be restricted to certain areas for instance where the fractures provide a path to the surface. So water geysers will appear on a cold world without a molton core in areas where gravitational stress fractures are grinding together and heating the ice to the boiling point, but these worlds by definition don't have magma, so because they don't have molten magma zone below the surface so they don't have a defined magma type, just a vulcanism type.

Major vulcanism may sometimes be associated with a magma subsurface zone but I have always associated it with the number of features since I first started exploring volcanic sites when they were brought out as a feature by FDEV. For instance cold bodies in close orbit around a gas giant will often have major vulcanism where identical bodies further out that aren't under as much stress will have fewer surface features and be described as having minor vulcanism, but the vulcanism type should never be descriped as magma. The terms major and minor vulcanism labels, and the unstated ones out there aren't associated with magma but with the number of surface features, that's been clear from early exploration of vulcanism. Bodies with a few sites will be minor, bodies with an intermediate number will be unspecified and bodies with a lot will be major.

At lease that's the way it has been up until the release of the FSS and the codex. I haven't looked into it since then but I have assumed it has not changed. I will check out my next few systems with vulcanism to see if it is still the same.

Of course most large bodies, up around the 6,000+klm radius, if they have vulcanism, should be almost always be defined by a magma type because like the earth they should still have a molten core, I will have to check that out as well. It may be that they have changed their descriptions since the release of the FSS and codex, but I see no reason why.
 
There is a correlation between the type of volcanism present, the type of planet it is (rocky, icy, HMC, etc) and the types of geological features that are potentially findable. This thread lists many of the more common combinations, but I don't think it's a complete list.
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Is there also such a list for bio POIs? I thought I had seen one before, but forgot to keep me a bookmark :(
 
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