Water tool to water bucket

Water tool is too hard, compliacated and annoying to use.
Just let us use a water bucket to pour into the hole.
So we can decide the level of water we want and the hole will fill as much as possible.



Using water tool is killing me.
 
That would require water physics, which is not in the game. Water physics would ask a lot of the cpu, which could be used for other things. Besides, right now there is 'no' water. It's just a flat texture over air. You can even 'place water' under water.
 
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Kerrash

Moderator
Not to mention, could you imagine finding that tiny little leaking hole you made in the terrain? [tongue]
 
As mentioned above, no. They've said water is purely cosmetic.
I know that, but I still have hope that it's still just temporarily, even if it takes a few years. RCT3 had better water. Again, I'm not asking for an improvement now, although it would be nice, but like in a year or two.
 
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I know that, but I still have hope that it's still just temporarily, even if it takes a few years. RCT3 had better water. Again, I'm not asking for an improvement now, although it would be nice, but like in a year or two.
RCT3 wasn't better lol

Edit: and no don't expect water physics in the next 5 years
 
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Water certainly needs some attention, they can't leave it as it is, I like the surface look, the reflections etc.....that looks lovely, it's beneath the waterline that lets the side down.

If there not doing "Physics' right now purely because of the cpu demand, couldn't physics be optionally for those that have super duper cpu's, I mean, how much cpu power is actually required, have the devs even mentioned this?
 
How much is required for water physics? Massive. We do flow dynamic with true water physics at work for designs on dams and bridges across rivers calculating flow and pressure and use basically a mini super computer.

I don't believe it will be achievable with the scope of the game and physics with current consumer hardware plus those people with super CPU's that may run it is probably around 5% of the demographic playing so to add a feature for that is a tall order really.

I have no problem with it personally. I don't need to see under it so not worried by it.

However the waterline ability needs tweaking because it's still a pain to get a decent level out of it.
 
Water physics would ask a lot of the cpu
People say this, but no.

A static body of water would not ask a lot of the CPU.

When it's moving? Sure. When it's filling? Yeah. But once it's settled? No.

Even a river is not CPU intensive if it's done properly. In Cities Skylines, one of the things they actually got right in terms of performance is that the water physics just plain work. Once you've got a flow going it essentially becomes a static animated object. The water isn't actually moving. It simply acts like an extending ooze, normalizes, and then there's a texture on it that flows.

It's only actually moving when you modify it in some way.
 
What do we need "physics" for. We dont need water to "flow naturally" from a high ground to a low ground. We just need water scenery effects like water falls and maybe some rapids that we place ourselves.

As for the actual water tool, I think an alternative could be made to how we add the current water "surface" like a click and hold to raise?

Didnt they add more water effects with the Rct3 SOAKED Expansions? I hope they can do that again with PC
 
People say this, but no.

A static body of water would not ask a lot of the CPU.

When it's moving? Sure. When it's filling? Yeah. But once it's settled? No.

Even a river is not CPU intensive if it's done properly. In Cities Skylines, one of the things they actually got right in terms of performance is that the water physics just plain work. Once you've got a flow going it essentially becomes a static animated object. The water isn't actually moving. It simply acts like an extending ooze, normalizes, and then there's a texture on it that flows.

It's only actually moving when you modify it in some way.
+1 for realistic water and water on different level (to have waterfalls)
You said the magic word: cities skylines! That is the best water system ever!
 
That would require water physics, which is not in the game. Water physics would ask a lot of the cpu, which could be used for other things. Besides, right now there is 'no' water. It's just a flat texture over air. You can even 'place water' under water.
Using special fx water splash cost more performance. I hope you understand that.
 
People say this, but no.

A static body of water would not ask a lot of the CPU.

When it's moving? Sure. When it's filling? Yeah. But once it's settled? No.

Even a river is not CPU intensive if it's done properly. In Cities Skylines, one of the things they actually got right in terms of performance is that the water physics just plain work. Once you've got a flow going it essentially becomes a static animated object. The water isn't actually moving. It simply acts like an extending ooze, normalizes, and then there's a texture on it that flows.

It's only actually moving when you modify it in some way.
Yes it does work amazing well for what it is, however it is still intensive for the computer. And it is water shaders which from what people have posted about it.

What needs to be considered is the reflection and refraction of light for the water texture that PC uses is significantly more detailed compared to that of CS.

So producing a shader to do the same as CS but look as good as PC is probably the current limitation.

http://www.skylineswiki.com/Water


It would be interesting to find out more details of how City Skylines does this with Unity as this feature is part of that engine and the difference to produce hat CS has in PC.

Edit: This suggests it's closer to true fluid dynamics though. I don't know CS enough so input and how they are achieving this would be interesting. It would certainly work better for flumes, rapids, rivers etc in game.

http://www.dlh.net/en/gaming-news/47630/cities-skylines----new-dev-diary-showcases-revolutionary-water-physics-and-zoning.html
 
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