Hardware & Technical Will your next GPU be a Radeon VII (7)

I'm interested in new midrange cards, my RX 480 has really bad fans (thanks, Asus) and could use more memory. Something around the 300€ mark with 8GB memory would be nice.

With the Idiotcoin market having gotten several dents maybe this generation will even be available in stores.
 
In a word no.

Its too expensive. Nice though for NVIDIA to get some competition for the $$ of the gaming 1%

Mentally i set my limit at around the £350 mark. Although has to be said the last card i bought RX480 i got for £250

So a GTX 2060 is at the upper end of my range, however i raise my eyebrows at paying £350 for a mid range 60 series card. I could expect that for a 70 series enthusiast level, but not the middle of the mainstream. That appears to me to be price gouging on NVIDIA's part.
 
Not unless they actually commit to their years of repeated promises of fully supporting linux builds with open drivers.
While nvidia is closed drivers, they actually work, and well.
And that's what I need, gpu h-ware/s-ware that works well in a multi-boot environment.
 
When AMD come up with actually good high end GPU to be a viable alternative to xx80/ti range I will consider. Till then, they are not even on my radar.
 
Ok i know its not navi (which is what everyones waiting for), but i expected more from 7nm Vega.

Its essentially 1080ti performance at 1080ti prices and that's a 2yr old card!

The 2080 comparison is also valid, but the Radeon comes off looking even worse, 2080 performance for 2080 prices but minus the RTX features.

Hopefully Navi can pull off 2080ti-like performance for 2-300$ less, then I'd be interested.
 
Not unless they actually commit to their years of repeated promises of fully supporting linux builds with open drivers.
They have actively supported the open-source (radeon/amdgpu/…) drivers since R200. Those have been working well for a very long time.
 
100% depends on the TDP/relative performance bench marks for me (and cost). Currently my upper aim hits a 6GB 1060, but i'm quite happy with my current 1050Ti.
 
100% depends on the TDP/relative performance bench marks for me (and cost).
The render model has two 8-pin PEG power connectors and it's just a Vega shrink (that, to get back to optimal_909 above, wasn't even "hyped" to the consumer market…), so between that, higher power density, and the performance target, I'd assume it around the same almost-300W mark as existing Vega64 cards.
 
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The render model has two 8-pin PEG power connectors and it's just a Vega shrink (that, to get back to optimal_909 above, wasn't even "hyped" to the consumer market…), so between that, higher power density, and the performance target, I'd assume it around the same almost-300W mark as existing Vega64 cards.
I am not saying that AMD hyped the market, I do not follow them that closely.
But the market definitely expected a Ryzen-moment in the GPU market - what I've seen so far is pretty far from that. Perhaps it will temper the Navi expectations, though.
 
I may get this GPU if the price goes down to £450. I refuse to spend any more then that on a GPU. I only spent £330 a few months after release on my AMD fury and that has served me very well, I can play ED on my oculus rift with it reasonably well and without the OR I get between 150-200fps on my 1080p monitor at ultra settings.

But I am getting a Pimax 5k+ soon and I need something better. So it will either be a used 1070ti, 1080, 1080ti an RTX 2060 or the new AMD Vega.
 
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100% depends on the TDP/relative performance bench marks for me (and cost).
Same here. AMD really need to get a grip on the TDP/thermals. My 1080 runs 25 degrees cooler under load than the AMD card it replaced so my room is no longer a sauna in the summer months. I know it's not everyone's primary purchasing criteria but it is mine.

The render model has two 8-pin PEG power connectors and it's just a Vega shrink (that, to get back to optimal_909 above, wasn't even "hyped" to the consumer market…), so between that, higher power density, and the performance target, I'd assume it around the same almost-300W mark as existing Vega64 cards.
Yep, 2x 8-pin and 3 fans, I'm guessing it runs hot so they haven't got a grip on the TDP/thermals. Looks like I'm waiting for Navi...
 
Yep, 2x 8-pin and 3 fans, I'm guessing it runs hot so they haven't got a grip on the TDP/thermals. Looks like I'm waiting for Navi...
From what I've heard Vega can be run extremely cool with surprisingly good performance to the point that the usual shootygames run at above-medium detail 1080p60 without the fans even spinning up, but it can scale up quite a ways from there. It'll be interesting to see how the new chip scales with power management, especially since AMD have been pushing that aspect with their latest drivers. (A 700€ card that runs at half power most of the time still isn't a good value proposition, but a 300€ unit with decent WEP that's silent in "normal" use… that I may be into.)
 
I've got two 1080 Ti's (in two separate systems) already, and my next upgrade will have to significantly out do these parts.

Not sure AMD's next release will qualify, but the generation after that, maybe.

2020 is looking to be a good year for GPU competition, with AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA all potentially having high-end parts hitting the market.
 
The TDP / thermals is the big weakness of AMD on CPUs and GPUs.

The day when they find the solution of this problem, will be a day of victory for them and for many new buyers.
 
The TDP / thermals is the big weakness of AMD on CPUs and GPUs.
At the higher-end, AMD parts generally have better performance per watt than Intel's currently.

Intel has been keeping the same offical TDP rating in their mainstream hex and octo core parts by adding largely optional power caps to the turbo states: https://www.anandtech.com/show/13544/why-intel-processors-draw-more-power-than-expected-tdp-turbo

In practice, it's not hard for a high-end Intel part to exceed it's TDP rating by more than double, which is a drastic change from most earlier parts.
 
At the higher-end, AMD parts generally have better performance per watt than Intel's currently.

Intel has been keeping the same offical TDP rating in their mainstream hex and octo core parts by adding largely optional power caps to the turbo states: https://www.anandtech.com/show/13544/why-intel-processors-draw-more-power-than-expected-tdp-turbo

In practice, it's not hard for a high-end Intel part to exceed it's TDP rating by more than double, which is a drastic change from most earlier parts.
Yeah. Intel didn't solder the heat spreader on the new i9 for reasons of being nice to the OC community.

They simply had to or they wouldn't have been able to get it any faster than the the 8 series, if not less.
 
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