The Star Citizen Thread v9

The thing is, we know by experience that when FDEV show of something, it's not that far away. When CIG show something normally there is a new fundraiser on the way, but not what is shown in the video.
When FDev show something they show it live, they play it, you know what you're getting.

CIG show you a cinematic and expect you to put your hand in your pocket. And when they show something live like the spaceworm or the Cryengine buggy falling through a ramp and loosing all of its wheels they show themselves up as the amateur hour no talent hacks that they know they are.
 
Not even 50 posts in and we're off topic.

This is a thread about Star Citizen. The rest of the forum (except the dinosaur bits) is about Elite Dangerous. Please stay on topic.
For a very brief while, there, I got excited that somehow dinosaurs had been added as a cover-all exception to on/off-topic rules until I remember the game… but really that should be a rule, so there. Hmpf.
 
I'll post something on-topic to balance my previous posts.

The reason the wheels came off the buggy is because there are no physics or collision detection associated with the wheels.

The buggy hovers above the surface and the wheels are tacked on and animated.
 
I'll post something on-topic to balance my previous posts.

The reason the wheels came off the buggy is because there are no physics or collision detection associated with the wheels.

The buggy hovers above the surface and the wheels are tacked on and animated.
Quite. It's time to quote this old gem again, I suppose:

Combat Theory said:
Now for star citizen.
As I said cry engine has a little package for simple vehicles like the grey cat which is a rudimentary mechanical driving model. But the apc had nothing to do with it. What the apc does is it completely splits the chassis from the wheels. The chassis runs on it's own behavior and the wheels have an independent code to "look like they guide it on the surface"
This becomes very clear when you look at what the chassis does when the vehicle runs over an obstacle for example. It does something no chassis of a wheeled vehicle ever does in real life or simulation. It stays still. There is a ton more indicators for this lack of actual mechanical connection between the wheels and the chassis too, like the lack of harmonics, the lack of feedback into the chassis etc. But the most telling thing is really that the chassis doesn't care if a wheel is fully compressing it's suspension.

I asked myself what would result in such behavior and what keeps the chassis in it's vertical position and the answer is as disappointing as funny. It's the same IFCS monstrosity that keeps the ships and the hover vehicles going.

IFCS is a strictly high order system. This means it doesn't care for details like mechanical parameters. You tell the ifcs "how something moves" not what keeps it moving that way. This means the entire mechanical simulation is floating. It's parameters don't matter. What matters is how you envision something to look like and the IFCS will use whatever it has available to achieve that movement pattern. This means that a spring might force 10 kilonewton between its ends at a certain compression, but when it gets compressed more it suddenly goes down to 0.1 kilonewton. This behavior is impossible for a spring, it goes against what a mechanical spring would ever do. But it is what the IFCS tells the spring to do in order to achieve a certain movement pattern.
This focus on the movement instead of mechanics is very similar to how a drone like a quadrocopter works, or a robotic arm. This kind of aproach to a full on vehicle simulation though, apart from the very strictly limited realm of zero G spaceflight, will always result in nightmarish and unsatisfying driving and flight behavior.

This use of a high order IFCS system is why the chassis doesn't give anything about the position of the individual wheel. And this is why the Rover can just into low earth orbit occasionally like the nox does when something goes haywire.
 
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Quite. It's time to quote this old gem again, I suppose:
This becomes very clear when you look at what the chassis does when the vehicle runs over an obstacle for example. It does something no chassis of a wheeled vehicle ever does in real life or simulation. It stays still.
BOSE Electromagnetic suspension disagrees with that.

[video=youtube;3KPYIaks1UY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KPYIaks1UY[/video]

Start looking at 0.55 and one can see the chassis is indeed still while the wheels bounce.
 
Quite. It's time to quote this old gem again, I suppose:
I never expected in a million years for that to have been posted somewhere.

That's it 100%.

Is there a sense that we're approaching or perhaps already in a period that a lot of 'stuff' can finally be shared?

Will there be a signal???
 
[haha] Too bad the APC used springs.
Hmm...the Ursa seems to be using what appears to be pneumatic suspension which i guess COULD be electromagnetically controlled instead of using gas pressure.

The Cyclone on the other hand very clearly has spring suspension - or as i would call it, ejecting suspension since it appears to loose wheels all the time.
 
Hmm...the Ursa seems to be using what appears to be pneumatic suspension which i guess COULD be electromagnetically controlled instead of using gas pressure.

The Cyclone on the other hand very clearly has spring suspension - or as i would call it, ejecting suspension since it appears to loose wheels all the time.
Dude, seriously and I'm not trolling - it floats above the surface and the wheels are tacked on. There's no physics underlying the movement of the suspension.

Everything is hacked in like this, that's why none of it works.
 
Dude, seriously and I'm not trolling - it floats above the surface and the wheels are tacked on. There's no physics underlying the movement of the suspension.

Everything is hacked in like this, that's why none of it works.
Hmm, a simple way to check this would that not be to shoot off each wheel and see if it still floats?
 
Hmm, a simple way to check this would that not be to shoot off each wheel and see if it still floats?
The detached wheel is a different object in a different state. I don't know what handles that, probably the Cry physics layer.

Vehicles and ships and torpedoes re all IFCS.

Maybe if you ask on Spectrum they might get John Pritchett to do a video on all of this stuff. From his bedroom :D
 
The detached wheel is a different object in a different state. I don't know what handles that, probably the Cry physics layer.

Vehicles and ships and torpedoes re all IFCS.

Maybe if you ask on Spectrum they might get John Pritchett to do a video on all of this stuff. From his bedroom :D
Hmm...an easy way to check that would be to remove SOME wheels and if they have added any physics the vehicle hull should start to at least tilt in sharp turns.
 
Not even 50 posts in and we're off topic.

This is a thread about Star Citizen. The rest of the forum (except the dinosaur bits) is about Elite Dangerous. Please stay on topic.
I'm not entirely sure that 'Off topic' is about Elite Dangerous, Dinosaurs or even Star Citizen, but I digress (again, sorry).
 
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