Your Character Is Not A Grizzled, Hard-Up Miner: They Are Filthy Rich (SHOCKING)

Your character can buy military-grade warships with pocket change. Pretending they are somehow financially unstable or not stinking rich is disingenuous.
I make this thread only because I've noticed a distinct trend in fleshed-out CMDRs - they're always some kind of grizzled person and emphasis is often placed on their mediocre, gritty living conditions. This doesn't make any sense, considering they could probably paper their ship's cargo hold with thousand-credit bills.

Why is everyone so obsessed with being grizzled and poor? Is it a projection thing? What does my character being a spoiled, irreverent rich brat mean for my real life personality?
 
Jean Paul Getty was richer than Croesus (and then some), but he scrimped and saved and largely refused to spend any of his money.

What I'm saying is that most players, like Getty, are inveterate misers who would push their grandmothers off a cliff if the old lady was standing on a penny.
 
Well, what's any of that worth if we as CMDRs

  • remain trapped in our Ships like mobile prison cells, tied to a chair and stuck inside a Remlok suit, with only an SRV or the oddball Telepresence allowing to escape that misery
  • remain worker bees, despite being Billionaires and being factual employers (Crew)
  • have almost nothing we could do or affect that exceeds a cosmetic nature
I tell ya, all that wealth, all those shiny Ships, all that "freedom"... It's a huge lie.
We're trapped worker bees that have to turn a hamster wheel. Like lab rats.

If I want an Element off a Planet Surface, why do I have to do it myself? Why can't I send my Crew to get mundane tasks done?
Why can't I send off my Crew in any of my Ships and have them perform tasks I find boring?

Instead, our Crews are laughing at us, enjoying passive income while >we< do all the hard lifting. Just like in the early days in a Sidewinder, no different.
Putting our hard-earned Equipment and our safety on the line every day.
We might fly tricked out Corvettes, Cutters, Anacondas, carry Naval Ranks with Federation or Empire, have highest Reputation with them or countless Factions.
But still, we can't even remotely order or have transported a single ton of Copper to our convenience.

No, we're not privileged. We're not free. We can't even look behind the darn doors that close off our Cockpits.
We just get to choose where we take our mobile prison cells with us, that's it.
All while our passive-income Crew sips Lavian Brandy and throws Billionaire-style parties at the Home Station. Seriously, tell me who's the real fools in this? Me thinks it's us :p
 
Well, what's any of that worth if we as CMDRs

  • remain trapped in our Ships like mobile prison cells, tied to a chair and stuck inside a Remlok suit, with only an SRV or the oddball Telepresence allowing to escape that misery
  • remain worker bees, despite being Billionaires and being factual employers (Crew)
  • have almost nothing we could do or affect that exceeds a cosmetic nature
I tell ya, all that wealth, all those shiny Ships, all that "freedom"... It's a huge lie.
We're trapped worker bees that have to turn a hamster wheel. Like lab rats.

If I want an Element off a Planet Surface, why do I have to do it myself? Why can't I send my Crew to get mundane tasks done?
Why can't I send off my Crew in any of my Ships and have them perform tasks I find boring?

Instead, our Crews are laughing at us, enjoying passive income while >we< do all the hard lifting. Just like in the early days in a Sidewinder, no different.
Putting our hard-earned Equipment and our safety on the line every day.
We might fly tricked out Corvettes, Cutters, Anacondas, carry Naval Ranks with Federation or Empire, have highest Reputation with them or countless Factions.
But still, we can't even remotely order or have transported a single ton of Copper to our convenience.

No, we're not privileged. We're not free. We can't even look behind the darn doors that close off our Cockpits.
We just get to choose where we take our mobile prison cells with us, that's it.
All while our passive-income Crew sips Lavian Brandy and throws Billionaire-style parties at the Home Station. Seriously, tell me who's the real fools in this? Me thinks it's us :p
The real fool is the person who doesn't turn off their viewscreen and go enjoy the nightlife at Jaques.
 
People are obsessed with that kind of gritty everyday dude trying to make a way in the galaxy because that's the whole premise of the game. We are meant to be the space equivalent of "man with van".

Unfortunately, game mechanics and the rampant inflation have very destroyed this illusion, so it's far too easy to get out of the gritty stage and into the "post-scarcity" economic stage.

A while back, using the value of precious metals as metrics, I was looking at the average income for a person and came to the conclusion that in order to have a wealthy and comfortable lifestyle an average high-pop planet would have to work only a few hours a century. That's not a few hours per person, that's the entire planet of billions living comfortably for an entire century because a single person went out in a Cobra for a day's work mining void opals. We are only billionaires because we decide to work for more than 20 seconds a decade.

This would also explain the lack of response to the Thargoid invasion, only 0.000000000001% of the population have had a shift at work since the beginning of the Thargoid invasion. Give it another billion years and we will start to see humanity mobilising, but that's a little way off.
 
People are obsessed with that kind of gritty everyday dude trying to make a way in the galaxy because that's the whole premise of the game. We are meant to be the space equivalent of "man with van".

Unfortunately, game mechanics and the rampant inflation have very destroyed this illusion, so it's far too easy to get out of the gritty stage and into the "post-scarcity" economic stage.

A while back, using the value of precious metals as metrics, I was looking at the average income for a person and came to the conclusion that in order to have a wealthy and comfortable lifestyle an average high-pop planet would have to work only a few hours a century. That's not a few hours per person, that's the entire planet of billions living comfortably for an entire century because a single person went out in a Cobra for a day's work mining void opals. We are only billionaires because we decide to work for more than 20 seconds a decade.

This would also explain the lack of response to the Thargoid invasion, only 0.000000000001% of the population have had a shift at work since the beginning of the Thargoid invasion. Give it another billion years and we will start to see humanity mobilising, but that's a little way off.
This is unironically my favourite post on the forums from the past year or so.
 
People are obsessed with that kind of gritty everyday dude trying to make a way in the galaxy because that's the whole premise of the game. We are meant to be the space equivalent of "man with van".

Unfortunately, game mechanics and the rampant inflation have very destroyed this illusion, so it's far too easy to get out of the gritty stage and into the "post-scarcity" economic stage.

A while back, using the value of precious metals as metrics, I was looking at the average income for a person and came to the conclusion that in order to have a wealthy and comfortable lifestyle an average high-pop planet would have to work only a few hours a century. That's not a few hours per person, that's the entire planet of billions living comfortably for an entire century because a single person went out in a Cobra for a day's work mining void opals. We are only billionaires because we decide to work for more than 20 seconds a decade.

This would also explain the lack of response to the Thargoid invasion, only 0.000000000001% of the population have had a shift at work since the beginning of the Thargoid invasion. Give it another billion years and we will start to see humanity mobilising, but that's a little way off.
'The Thargoids are attacking! They're going to wipe out humanity!'
'We need to respond!'
'Yes!'
'Do you think that'll involve a lot of work?'
'Ummm... yeah, yeah it probably will.'
'Who's signed up for doing work this year?'
'Bob.'
'Go fetch Bob, tell him to leave the void opals for the rest of his shift and get rid of the Thargoid menace for us. He'll have to be done before lunch, though.'
 
People are obsessed with that kind of gritty everyday dude trying to make a way in the galaxy because that's the whole premise of the game. We are meant to be the space equivalent of "man with van".

Unfortunately, game mechanics and the rampant inflation have very destroyed this illusion, so it's far too easy to get out of the gritty stage and into the "post-scarcity" economic stage.

A while back, using the value of precious metals as metrics, I was looking at the average income for a person and came to the conclusion that in order to have a wealthy and comfortable lifestyle an average high-pop planet would have to work only a few hours a century. That's not a few hours per person, that's the entire planet of billions living comfortably for an entire century because a single person went out in a Cobra for a day's work mining void opals. We are only billionaires because we decide to work for more than 20 seconds a decade.

This would also explain the lack of response to the Thargoid invasion, only 0.000000000001% of the population have had a shift at work since the beginning of the Thargoid invasion. Give it another billion years and we will start to see humanity mobilising, but that's a little way off.
Alas it's all too true.
 
Your character can buy military-grade warships with pocket change. Pretending they are somehow financially unstable or not stinking rich is disingenuous.
I make this thread only because I've noticed a distinct trend in fleshed-out CMDRs - they're always some kind of grizzled person and emphasis is often placed on their mediocre, gritty living conditions. This doesn't make any sense, considering they could probably paper their ship's cargo hold with thousand-credit bills.

Why is everyone so obsessed with being grizzled and poor? Is it a projection thing? What does my character being a spoiled, irreverent rich brat mean for my real life personality?
Military grade? Meh, I don't even get out of dock for anything less than reactive ... darling.
 
Your character can buy military-grade warships with pocket change. Pretending they are somehow financially unstable or not stinking rich is disingenuous.
I make this thread only because I've noticed a distinct trend in fleshed-out CMDRs - they're always some kind of grizzled person and emphasis is often placed on their mediocre, gritty living conditions. This doesn't make any sense, considering they could probably paper their ship's cargo hold with thousand-credit bills.

Why is everyone so obsessed with being grizzled and poor? Is it a projection thing? What does my character being a spoiled, irreverent rich brat mean for my real life personality?
Space hipsters

Is it poor form to send out your collection limpets before your prey has actually exploded? The looks they give these limpets is heart wrenching... they just give up.

But I've told them "If any of you hurt or otherwise harm any of my limpets, I'll kill you. Then I'll kill your families, and burn your damn houses".
 
I see us as really expensive freelancers at best. We are waaaaay better off than some dirtsider, and can status around as compared to other pilots, but we are waaaay below folks who have offices on Mars.

I doubt that many of the erryday groundlings could scrape together enough of their single-planetary monies to opt in to the Credit system (that's for spacers), but we in turn aren't going to be "real" rich folks no matter how many credits we obtain. To me the Eliteverse appears very stratified.
 
I always preferred to compare the CMDRs to the Ultras of Alastair Reynolds or to the mindset of the K-Ship pilot described by Harrison in the Light series: Socially and biologically distanced from normal humanity and with morals that tend to be pink and yellow, instead of white and black.
 
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