Does Frontier think Jaguars are Leopards?

Interesting. I really thought it would be impossible for Cheetahs to climb on Trees
Unlike alll other cats, Cheetahs claws don't retract, and as such don't climb in as much as they can jump like conventional cats, and thus basically jump to a low branch to another if need be, their claws are designed in such a way for traction as they run, not climb, though they do keep them from slipping a bit.
 
I mentioned this in the Camel and Bison Size thread, and I will do it again here. My recommendation to Frontier would be forming a quality control team specifically for accuracy issues in the game to avoid situations like this. With such a team it would be quite easy to pinpoint errors before new content gets released to the public.

I was also wondering for a while now how the code that determines how much time each species or life stage spends on climbing structures works. Like the difference between how much a cub or adult spends climbing, or how different a time each species spends. There could also be a difference between actual climbing of poles and the time spent on platforms, even sleeping on them. I had also noticed how odd some of those ratios are for some species, but with the launch of the SA pack, this has become even more obvious. Since, jaguar, an animal that would normally spend relative less time on such areas than some other animals (some of those can't even climb for some reason, like the pangolin) spends a lot of time climbing. It also has the need in its requirements. This extreme example has once more underlined how much a review the climbing system needs badly. I'm glad someone created a thread on it, even if it is for a single animal. We can at least bring this entire issue to the developers's attention, including other animals.
 
My recommendation to Frontier would be forming a quality control team specifically for accuracy issues in the game to avoid situations like this. With such a team it would be quite easy to pinpoint errors before new content gets released to the public.
This would be absolutely awesome. There is so much to fix regarding Social Behavior of some Species, Climbing Behavior and other Things
 
Technically it would be near impossible if the tree is upright and very smooth. At least they would take a lot of time and the tree has to be thick enough to allow them to partly hug it.
Cheetahs don't actually climb, they will most often run and jump to a low branch and then to a higher one as need be. Same basic thing when they descend, they jump to lower branches.
 
Cheetahs don't actually climb, they will most often run and jump to a low branch and then to a higher one as need be. Same basic thing when they descend, they jump to lower branches.
Exactly. As you can see in the video, it is having a bad time even when attempting to scale a slanted, rugged tree. Mostly using its velocity to scale the trunk and then trying to cling on. It wouldn't really be considered climbing. For that an animal has to be able to go up any smooth upright trunk properly using their claws or hands.
 
Cheetahs don't actually climb, they will most often run and jump to a low branch and then to a higher one as need be. Same basic thing when they descend, they jump to lower branches.
Exactly. As you can see in the video, it is having a bad time even when attempting to scale a slanted, rugged tree. Mostly using its velocity to scale the trunk and then trying to cling on. It wouldn't really be considered climbing. For that an animal has to be able to go up any smooth upright trunk properly using their claws or hands.
Would you not call this climbing?
Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--_Rg6TNGhM

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlBciURVEv8

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhavvzBQhz4

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDB4g7-E-zc
 
It's still not conventional climbing. If you pay attention, they are mostly using velocity to "run up" the trunk instead of actually sinking their claws in it to hold on. Actual climbing animals would be able to stop halfway up and be comfortable and then keep on climbing with ease. Sure cheetah claws can provide traction to a degree, and somewhat cling on halfway using partly their claws and partly hugging the trunk as seen in the video I sent, but it's still not as comfortable as it would be with an actual climber.
 
Exactly. As you can see in the video, it is having a bad time even when attempting to scale a slanted, rugged tree. Mostly using its velocity to scale the trunk and then trying to cling on. It wouldn't really be considered climbing. For that an animal has to be able to go up any smooth upright trunk properly using their claws or hands.
If I could jump as well as a cheetah, I could by pass a step ladder and access the first branch.
If I had the balance of a cat, I could after reaching the first branch jump to another.
What part of my endeavor could or would be considered climbing?
Perhaps it all boils down to semantics. Though new words are added to dictionaries every year, even more meanings are added to existing words; Which shouldn't but often do by the current generations, negate any or all of the other meanings.
 
I mentioned this in the Camel and Bison Size thread, and I will do it again here. My recommendation to Frontier would be forming a quality control team specifically for accuracy issues in the game to avoid situations like this. With such a team it would be quite easy to pinpoint errors before new content gets released to the public.
This is most definitely needed. There are so many error in the game that need attention.
 
It seems like I've remembered correctly that Mountain Lions are rarely also called Panthers (but it seems like it mostly happens in the US that they are called Panthers). Maybe they were called Panthers more often in the Wild West when (at least I assume) Leopards and Jaguars weren't that well known by most People. There is also the Florida Panther which is a Subspecies of Mountain Lion that mostly lives in Wetlands
As far as I know, cougars are referred to as panthers, mountain lions, and just cougars (among many other things) all over the US. I think that the term "panther" is most correctly used to describe cougars, but I could be wrong. I rarely hear leopards and jaguars called panthers, not counting "black panther" variations.

For the main point of this thread, I think that it shouldn't be necessary for jaguars. I have seen a jaguar climb an enrichment platform at a cat rescue near me, but ultimately, at least compared to leopards, they aren't huge climbers. I mean, if you put a human in an enclosed area without that much to do they'll probably climb a tree/climbing frame in their spare time. Even in the "wild" humans still climb things for fun. But compared to our chimp and bonobo relatives, we don't climb much, nor is it essential.
 
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As far as I know, cougars are referred to as panthers, mountain lions, and just cougars (among many other things) all over the US. I think that the term "panther" is most correctly used to describe cougars, but I could be wrong. I rarely hear leopards and jaguars called panthers, not counting "black panther" variations.

For the main point of this thread, I think that it shouldn't be necessary for jaguars. I have seen a jaguar climb an enrichment platform at a cat rescue near me, but ultimately, at least compared to leopards, they aren't huge climbers. I mean, if you put a human in an enclosed area without that much to do they'll probably climb a tree/climbing frame in their spare time. Even in the "wild" humans still climb things for fun. But compared to our chimp and bonobo relatives, we don't climb much, nor is it essential.
Having owned a Black Panther for years, I can tell ya that Panther's are not cougars, puma's, mountain lions etc etc etc. They are in actuality Leopards, if and when one is up close and the lighting is right, can actually see the spots. Much in the same way various animals are white aka albino, panther's are black leopards.
 
Having owned a Black Panther for years, I can tell ya that Panther's are not cougars, puma's, mountain lions etc etc etc. They are in actuality Leopards, if and when one is up close and the lighting is right, can actually see the spots. Much in the same way various animals are white aka albino, panther's are black leopards.
Um, you're wrong. Wikipedia says that panther is indeed a synonym for mountain lion. Don't trust it? Fine, let's try more reliable sources. National Wildlife Federation, Mountain Lion Foundation, San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants, US Forest Service, take your pick. All of them say panther is another name for the cougar/puma/mountain lion. "Black panther" does describe a melanistic jaguar or leopard. Without the "black" in front of it, panther is going to probably mean a mountain lion. And yes, I know you can see the spots, there's a cat rescue near me (that's gotten a lot of bad press recently) that has some who, like all the other cats, were rescued from bad places.
 
Um, you're wrong. Wikipedia says that panther is indeed a synonym for mountain lion. Don't trust it? Fine, let's try more reliable sources. National Wildlife Federation, Mountain Lion Foundation, San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants, US Forest Service, take your pick. All of them say panther is another name for the cougar/puma/mountain lion. "Black panther" does describe a melanistic jaguar or leopard. Without the "black" in front of it, panther is going to probably mean a mountain lion. And yes, I know you can see the spots, there's a cat rescue near me (that's gotten a lot of bad press recently) that has some who, like all the other cats, were rescued from bad places.
Cougars, mountain lions, puma's etc etc etc do not have any signs of spots or other marking on their pelts. Though they are slightly different, jaguar's leopards have spots, the spots on a panther though almost invisible are basically the same as on the leopard. This whole debate reminds me of the debate between what constitutes a vegetable vs a fruit. Just because someone a long time ago referred to a vegetable as a fruit when after tasting it concluded it was sweet, doesn't make it a fruit. The bottom line is; The seeds of a fruit are contained within it, the seeds of a vegetable are not. Black Panther's have spots, cougars or what ever one wants to refer to them as, do not.
 
Cougars, mountain lions, puma's etc etc etc do not have any signs of spots or other marking on their pelts.
That's just wrong.Pumas are actually born with spots.The cubs start to lose the spots at around 3 months average,but some adults don't and thus keep them their whole life.Spotted adult pumas are much more common in the subpopulation in Florida also referred to as the "Florida Panther".
 
Can we agree on that people refer to many felidae as pathers?
I think it is because of our ancestors, when discovering new parts of the world, tended to call new animals they saw like animals they knew from home.

There is no need to quarrel over if panther means puma or jaguar or leopard. Actually the whole genus of big cats were called Panthera (although the puma doesn't belong to that genus - I know ;)) by Carl von Linné.
 
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Cougars, mountain lions, puma's etc etc etc do not have any signs of spots or other marking on their pelts. Though they are slightly different, jaguar's leopards have spots, the spots on a panther though almost invisible are basically the same as on the leopard. This whole debate reminds me of the debate between what constitutes a vegetable vs a fruit. Just because someone a long time ago referred to a vegetable as a fruit when after tasting it concluded it was sweet, doesn't make it a fruit. The bottom line is; The seeds of a fruit are contained within it, the seeds of a vegetable are not. Black Panther's have spots, cougars or what ever one wants to refer to them as, do not.
I think you're getting confused. I wasn't saying that cougars are the same as leopards, I was saying that panther can be a name for a mountain lion. Look:

Cougar: Can be called panther.
Leopard/jaguar: Usually not called panther.
Black leopard/jaguar: Usually called a black panther.

Just to clarify one last time, COUGARS ARE NOT THE SAME AS LEOPARDS. THEY ARE A DIFFERENT KIND OF CAT, THAT CAN STILL BE REFERRED TO AS A PANTHER.
 
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