Could Frontier please demonstrate how to use the FSS enjoyably?

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The FSS is the curates egg.

For an explorer, out in the great yonder, the FSS is Good - in part.

My Exploring "work-cycle" is based around the following sequence:

1. Charge FSD to next system in route
[2. Write down the name of the system and star class of next body in my exploration log during FSD charging and maybe fill in some extra detail of system just left while in witchspace.]
3. Arrive in new system - line up for next jump and surf the corona to scoop, retaining full throttle and pressing Honk.
4. When lined up safely surfing/scooping and Honk is complete, mentally note number of bodies, stay full throttle: open system map, check whether visited, check number of stars and star classes.
5. Close system map - Check left panel for Signal Sources.
[6. Write down number of stars and number of other system bodies, and write down the other star classes, tick if not tagged.]
7. Once scooped and just clear of corona, Open FSS
8. Check FSS for bodies of interest:
IF none, close FSS; GOTO #1 (charge FSD for next jump).
ELSE, explore bodies of interest, up to full system scan to resolve any GEO (and BIO) signals, [writing down details in journal] prior to closing FSS and visiting each signal body for DSS and landing on.. then composition scanning GEO and BIO [and writing down the details in the journal...], (and filling up on any worthwhile mats); GOTO #1

The technique I use to resolve GEO and BIO is to zoom into the body, and check if the scan resolves to NONE within 2 sec. If not, take a mental note of the body, move onto the next body and at some point later while still in the FSS, go back to that noted body to see what secrets lie awaiting... there's no need to wait for 30 sec on each body - your FSS can conduct concurrent activity to cut the waiting time and boredom factor.


The way I see it is that, for an explorer the whole jump; scoop; honk/ jump; scoop; honk/ jump; scoop; honk/ would get pretty tiresome if there was no other activity to break that cycle up.
The other point to note is that BIO signals are pretty rare such that you actually never know if you are going to find any or not, so when the FSS reveals that BIOLOGICAL is present, that moment of success is the reward for all the effort invested.

Sometimes, I'm on an express leg, and don't scan the FSS unless there are WW, ELW or AW present. Staying in the FSS is the best way to slow progress when simply "travelling".
Sometimes, I'm on a go-slow and using economical jumps and only travelling between O,B,A,F,W,Non-sequence,Proto, and fully explore most systems in the FSS... ie. "exploring".


For what it is supposed to do, I reckon it's a fairly decent stab at something workable and still holds interest.
(For sure, I'd change a few minor things, mechanically, but overall, it's still fairly decent at its intended function)

Yours Aye

Mark H
 
I enjoy the FSS too. I scanned over 45k bodies on the way to Beagle and back. One technique I used was after the initial honk to fly perpendicular to the orbital plane before dropping into the FSS. This had two benefits - it reduced the possibility of obscuring a body behind the main sun. The perspective also allowed to get a sense of how the system was laid out around the sun - you are looking down onto the layers of the onion so to speak. You get a better sense of the regions where the high metals and gas giants etc are probably hanging out. Of course in multi stellar systems that have distant secondary stars you can't make much of how stuff is laid out around those stars, but I guess you can't have it all :)

The technique I use to resolve GEO and BIO is to zoom into the body, and check if the scan resolves to NONE within 2 sec. If not, take a mental note of the body, move onto the next body and at some point later while still in the FSS, go back to that noted body to see what secrets lie awaiting... there's no need to wait for 30 sec on each body - your FSS can conduct concurrent activity to cut the waiting time and boredom factor.
This is what I did too, rather than stare at the spinning wheel (hexagon?)
 
What a beautiful strawman you've constructed.

Since I find the FSS to be overly simplistic I've replaced it for body discovery with parallax searching, which involves a lot more effort to both locate the bodies and resolve them. But yeah, I'M the one who's lazy.
Scared the crow out of you, didn’t it?

Though I must ask, if the FSS is over-simplistic, what was the ADS?

I find 3 distinct groups of players in Elite:

1. Those who just play the game. They use what tools we have, sometimes make suggestions on how they could be improved, and go about their lives.

2. Those Who Want the Game to Play For Them. Everything is a grind, too hard, they only get 10 minutes of computer time a month, whine endlessly and are not taken seriously by anyone because listening to them is the real grind.

3. Those Who Must Suffer. Mostly Brits, largely opinionated, quote things they’ve read on other sites constantly, and find everything to be far too easy and invent new ways to compound their misery by making even the simplest concepts into Rube Goldberg inspired torture-devices. They’ll fly circles around a station for at least two hours, “because real air/space traffic would have holding patterns, don’t you know. It says so on reddit, and I have a fake meme about it too.” They’re almost as hard as #2 to take seriously, but must be watched, because they won’t be satisfied until nothing is fun for anyone.
 
I can't tell how to enjoy the FSS (just that I do) but I highly recommend getting used to it as more and more functionality is getting covert by the FSS now. Mission USS'es for instance are very easy to find now, look for an orange circle in the FSS view... It's not a tool exclusively for exploring and apparently not the right tool for postcard explorers. :whistle:
 
Scared the crow out of you, didn’t it?

Though I must ask, if the FSS is over-simplistic, what was the ADS?

I find 3 distinct groups of players in Elite:

1. Those who just play the game. They use what tools we have, sometimes make suggestions on how they could be improved, and go about their lives.

2. Those Who Want the Game to Play For Them. Everything is a grind, too hard, they only get 10 minutes of computer time a month, whine endlessly and are not taken seriously by anyone because listening to them is the real grind.

3. Those Who Must Suffer. Mostly Brits, largely opinionated, quote things they’ve read on other sites constantly, and find everything to be far too easy and invent new ways to compound their misery by making even the simplest concepts into Rube Goldberg inspired torture-devices. They’ll fly circles around a station for at least two hours, “because real air/space traffic would have holding patterns, don’t you know. It says so on reddit, and I have a fake meme about it too.” They’re almost as hard as #2 to take seriously, but must be watched, because they won’t be satisfied until nothing is fun for anyone.
The meta for the old discovery process wasn't to just scan everything as quickly as possible, it was to identify & prioritise targets.

What do you enjoy about the new process?
 
The meta for the old discovery process wasn't to just scan everything as quickly as possible, it was to identify & prioritise targets.

What do you enjoy about the new process?
In the old way, I just flew the required distance to the planet to scan and fly to the next one. NOW I see (in zoom mode) the true beauty of some planets / gas giants and this animates me to fly closer and take some nice screenshots.
 
I can't tell how to enjoy the FSS (just that I do) but I highly recommend getting used to it as more and more functionality is getting covert by the FSS now. Mission USS'es for instance are very easy to find now, look for an orange circle in the FSS view... It's not a tool exclusively for exploring and apparently not the right tool for postcard explorers. :whistle:
For missions the FSS is unreliable, scanning the nav beacon is quicker unless you get lucky (I usually quickly check the FSS & if the target isn't immediately apparent I just go for the nav beacon). There is a choice at least. For exploration there is not a viable alternative.

Perhaps you could describe how you enjoy the FSS, or make it enjoyable?
 
I can't tell how to enjoy the FSS (just that I do) but I highly recommend getting used to it as more and more functionality is getting covert by the FSS now. Mission USS'es for instance are very easy to find now, look for an orange circle in the FSS view... It's not a tool exclusively for exploring and apparently not the right tool for postcard explorers. :whistle:
I think there might be an improvement possible for USS's because in high pop areas it can be tough to keep up with all the new spawning ones. If resolving one of them resolved them all (like resolving asteroid belts seems to, for me anyway) that might be cool? But I also like the FSS in general. In my case because it's all futuristic and stuff like innit. Some might not call this a good argument but it's my opinion, as for me it works like instrumentation and if you care enough to get (well) paid for the cartographics you should probably care enough to know what you surveyed. I pay more attention to the discoveries, and spot more oddities, than I used to.
 
Scared the crow out of you, didn’t it?

Though I must ask, if the FSS is over-simplistic, what was the ADS?

I find 3 distinct groups of players in Elite:

1. Those who just play the game. They use what tools we have, sometimes make suggestions on how they could be improved, and go about their lives.

2. Those Who Want the Game to Play For Them. Everything is a grind, too hard, they only get 10 minutes of computer time a month, whine endlessly and are not taken seriously by anyone because listening to them is the real grind.

3. Those Who Must Suffer. Mostly Brits, largely opinionated, quote things they’ve read on other sites constantly, and find everything to be far too easy and invent new ways to compound their misery by making even the simplest concepts into Rube Goldberg inspired torture-devices. They’ll fly circles around a station for at least two hours, “because real air/space traffic would have holding patterns, don’t you know. It says so on reddit, and I have a fake meme about it too.” They’re almost as hard as #2 to take seriously, but must be watched, because they won’t be satisfied until nothing is fun for anyone.
The ADS was simplistic too, but at least you had to fly around the system to explore stuff. I can't get any enjoyment out of pressing the zoom in and zoom out buttons over and over again.

As for your pigeonholing of players, it's clear that FDev catered to category 2 with the FSS implementation. It's just a shame they didn't leave the old tools in place for category 1.
 
In the old way, I just flew the required distance to the planet to scan and fly to the next one. NOW I see (in zoom mode) the true beauty of some planets / gas giants and this animates me to fly closer and take some nice screenshots.
That exact statement works the other way (old vs new) too ;)
 
...
2. Those Who Want the Game to Play For Them. Everything is a grind, too hard, they only get 10 minutes of computer time a month, whine endlessly and are not taken seriously by anyone because listening to them is the real grind.
...
A game you actually have to play? Hell no, where's the entertainment?
pssst... rumors are that netflix is going to start an anti-FSS campain as it's too bad for their business...
 
A game you actually have to play? Hell no, where's the entertainment?
pssst... rumors are that netflix is going to start an anti-FSS campain as it's too bad for their business...
Surely playing a spaceship game would involve flying your spaceship? The FSS was designed explicitly to remove that 'grind'.
 
Though I must ask, if the FSS is over-simplistic, what was the ADS?
The FSS is bad, and the ADS was also bad. Frontier could do better than either of them.

For the record, I mean the FSS as the interface and its gameplay. The auto-scanner is good, and I quite like the parallax suggestion, but that's not a part of the FSS. It's the same as how scanning a nav beacon to find all the signal sources in the system (great for hunting HGEs) is a mechanic that allows side-stepping the FSS.
 
Your statement makes me wonder if you actually used the ADS to find something.

Perhaps you could have a go at answering the OP's question on Frontier's behalf with a video or description of what you enjoy about it? I like the benefit of being able to scan at a distance but it seems like a repetitive, disjointed chore to me.
I did. Pre-FSS I have a number of First Discoveries to my name, mostly in Guardian Space. However, since the advent of the FSS, I have been exploring pretty much non-stop. I departed Shinrarta on patch release day, set a course for the edge of the galaxy and have been circumnavigating ever since.

How about, instead of a video, a rather well-liked thread link: https://forums.frontier.co.uk/threads/could-frontier-please-demonstrate-how-to-use-the-fss-enjoyably.514074/#post-7837346

I think this should spell out what there is to like and why I like it, but if not...

The ADS gave an instant snapshot of an entire system. If you wanted the details of any given planet you had to fly, sometimes a few minutes, sometimes, many times, much, much further. If, in a spacious binary system, the nearest planet orbiting the secondary star was 306,292 light seconds away from entry, that meant a long flight to scan a featureless ball of rock. You could wrack up hours of very pointless flying from planet to planet, especially when distant planets has opposing orbits. To find what?

That was another problem. The Detailed Surface Scanner gave us no details about the surface. Composition, sure. Loads of nerd data, sure. But surface data? None.

If you had cause to suspect something MIGHT be down there, you’d find yourself flying low and slow for hours upon hours hoping to spot by eye a geyser or cluster of brain trees, or anything, and you could still miss it.

The upgraded DSS remedies that.

The FSS gives us something to actually do, not just honk and be done. Activity always beats a lack of activity.

Old ADS+DSS Exploration was “Watch lots of Netflix while holding trigger 2”.

New FSS+DSS is actually looking at the screen, being involved in the process.
 
The ADS was simplistic too, but at least you had to fly around the system to explore stuff. I can't get any enjoyment out of pressing the zoom in and zoom out buttons over and over again.
If you want to do that then drop some probes? Mapping planets is surely the new 'fly about to discover stuff'. Being able to discover whole planets from a distance is definitely an improvement for me, as what's happened is the scale of the discoveries got smaller; You still need to get up close to really explore and find surface features but that works for me.
 
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For missions the FSS is unreliable, scanning the nav beacon is quicker unless you get lucky (I usually quickly check the FSS & if the target isn't immediately apparent I just go for the nav beacon). There is a choice at least. For exploration there is not a viable alternative.

Perhaps you could describe how you enjoy the FSS, or make it enjoyable?
In most cases I'm meanwhile faster with the FSS (unless I'm really unlucky, like in a system fully cluttered by 30 or more USS'es and the mission one is one of the last one's scanned). For most planetary missions it's not working though - yet.
Btw, I used the time other's spending for their anti FSS campaign to get good at it. :p

There's one thing I can't do though: Showing the fun via video. Watching someone using the FSS is even more boring than watching a 20 minutes PvP duel. You just get to do it by yourself (shocker!). And FUN is probably the most subjective adjective anyways...
 
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